OK: Found an XML parser.
OK: Support for GZIP encoding.
OK: Support for character munging.

Notice: MagpieRSS [debug] Returning STALE object for https://nysenewsupdates.com/feed in /home/morrisc/public_html/rep/rss/rss_fetch.inc on line 243

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Channel: NYSE news

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      ["title"]=>
      string(40) "In Tuscany, oil and wine: the same fight"
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Par Margherita Nasi

Posted today at 5:00 a.m.

In 1513, Nicolas Machiavelli wrote The prince at the Albergaccio, a house located south of Florence. A few kilometers away, in the gentle Tuscan countryside, the humanist also owned an estate with a view of the Chianti hills, which was bought at the beginning of the 19th century.e century by Bartolini Baldelli. The family, long active in politics – mingling with Marie de Medici as well as with Bonaparte – has devoted itself for nearly two centuries to the two pillars of Tuscan gastronomy: wine and olive oil.

Giovanna Bartolini Baldelli, Lorenzo and Alberto Bianchi in the cave of the Fattoria di Bagnolo, on 15 July 2021.

The former property of the Machiavellians is now called Fattoria di Bagnolo. On the one hand, ten hectares are devoted to vineyards – mainly sangiovese, but also indigenous varieties such as colorino, canaiolo, malvoisie or trebbiano. On the other hand, some 6,500 olive trees are available in five varieties: frantoio, morellino, leccino, pendolino and madonna di Impruneta. “We have a great history. We have chosen to make this place an exclusive sales site for individuals: nearly two thousand regular customers, coming from all over the world to discover our products ”, details Giovanna Bartolini Baldelli. Linen pants, gray cardigan, pearl earrings, the sexagenarian manages the farm with her son, Alberto Bianchi, 31 years old.

On this hot July day, they are organizing, after months of the Covid-19 pandemic, an oil and wine tasting. If the tourists have not yet returned, two tenants have however snubbed the swimming pool of the property to discover the agricultural side of their home. Giovanna Bartolini Baldelli is delighted: “Before, the residence brought together aristocrats and peasants. Today, we still live there, but the sharecroppers’ houses are rented out for the long term. It’s a bit of a community of friends. “

Tradition and modernity

Since living at the Fattoria di Bagnolo, Alberto Zanol, owner of the Rio Grande restaurant in Florence, has been seasoning his barbecue (grilled meats) with olive nectar: “And to think that before I swore only by corn oil!” “, laughs the Brazilian chef. “We even managed to get our Milanese tenant to give up butter, sacred in Lombardy, renchérit Giovanna Bartolini Baldelli. Isn’t it, Michele? “When I moved here four years ago, I discovered that, like wine, oil has terroirs and varieties”, confirms the interested party.

You have 71.66% of this article to read. The rest is for subscribers only.

" } ["wfw"]=> array(1) { ["commentrss"]=> string(72) "https://nysenewsupdates.com/in-tuscany-oil-and-wine-the-same-fight/feed/" } ["slash"]=> array(1) { ["comments"]=> string(1) "0" } ["summary"]=> string(110) "Par Margherita Nasi Posted today at 5:00 a.m. Reserved for our subscribers Reportage“The golden drops..." ["atom_content"]=> string(4098) "

Par Margherita Nasi

Posted today at 5:00 a.m.

In 1513, Nicolas Machiavelli wrote The prince at the Albergaccio, a house located south of Florence. A few kilometers away, in the gentle Tuscan countryside, the humanist also owned an estate with a view of the Chianti hills, which was bought at the beginning of the 19th century.e century by Bartolini Baldelli. The family, long active in politics – mingling with Marie de Medici as well as with Bonaparte – has devoted itself for nearly two centuries to the two pillars of Tuscan gastronomy: wine and olive oil.

Giovanna Bartolini Baldelli, Lorenzo and Alberto Bianchi in the cave of the Fattoria di Bagnolo, on 15 July 2021.

The former property of the Machiavellians is now called Fattoria di Bagnolo. On the one hand, ten hectares are devoted to vineyards – mainly sangiovese, but also indigenous varieties such as colorino, canaiolo, malvoisie or trebbiano. On the other hand, some 6,500 olive trees are available in five varieties: frantoio, morellino, leccino, pendolino and madonna di Impruneta. “We have a great history. We have chosen to make this place an exclusive sales site for individuals: nearly two thousand regular customers, coming from all over the world to discover our products ”, details Giovanna Bartolini Baldelli. Linen pants, gray cardigan, pearl earrings, the sexagenarian manages the farm with her son, Alberto Bianchi, 31 years old.

On this hot July day, they are organizing, after months of the Covid-19 pandemic, an oil and wine tasting. If the tourists have not yet returned, two tenants have however snubbed the swimming pool of the property to discover the agricultural side of their home. Giovanna Bartolini Baldelli is delighted: “Before, the residence brought together aristocrats and peasants. Today, we still live there, but the sharecroppers’ houses are rented out for the long term. It’s a bit of a community of friends. “

Tradition and modernity

Since living at the Fattoria di Bagnolo, Alberto Zanol, owner of the Rio Grande restaurant in Florence, has been seasoning his barbecue (grilled meats) with olive nectar: “And to think that before I swore only by corn oil!” “, laughs the Brazilian chef. “We even managed to get our Milanese tenant to give up butter, sacred in Lombardy, renchérit Giovanna Bartolini Baldelli. Isn’t it, Michele? “When I moved here four years ago, I discovered that, like wine, oil has terroirs and varieties”, confirms the interested party.

You have 71.66% of this article to read. The rest is for subscribers only.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1627011961) } [1]=> array(14) { ["title"]=> string(56) "Ecuador declares “state of emergency” in its prisons" ["link"]=> string(79) "https://nysenewsupdates.com/ecuador-declares-state-of-emergency-in-its-prisons/" ["comments"]=> string(87) "https://nysenewsupdates.com/ecuador-declares-state-of-emergency-in-its-prisons/#respond" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(11) "Susan Hally" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Fri, 23 Jul 2021 03:40:09 +0000" ["category"]=> string(44) "AmericasdeclaresEcuadoremergencyprisonsstate" ["guid"]=> string(79) "https://nysenewsupdates.com/ecuador-declares-state-of-emergency-in-its-prisons/" ["description"]=> string(108) "Ecuadorian soldiers near a prison in Cotopaxi province (center), Thursday, July 22, 2021. RODRIGO BUENDIA..." ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(4665) "

After new deadly riots in Ecuador, President Guillermo Lasso decreed, Thursday, July 22, ” emergency state “ in the country’s prisons in order to ” restore order “. The latest official report shows 22 dead and sixty wounded.

“We are going to start a process of total restructuring of the prison system”, said the head of state from the province of Cotopaxi (center), where the majority of victims were recorded.

Guillermo Lasso announced that the army will henceforth be responsible for controlling access to prisons, while the police will guard the interior. Until now, the security of prisons has been ensured by civilian prison guards. The director of the prison administration has been replaced by a soldier.

79 dead in one day in February

The prison administration had suspended, earlier in the day, certain activities “Capable of endangering the prison population and administrative officials”. According to a source with the administration, visits have been suspended in some establishments.

According to the governor of Cotopaxi, Oswaldo Coronel, on Wednesday, the rioters “Used large caliber firearms, as well as explosives which caused extensive damage inside the penitentiary center”. Prisoners managed to escape at dawn on Thursday. 78 of them were caught by the police but it is not known how many detainees are still at large.

Article reserved for our subscribers Read also In Ecuador, mutinies in three prisons kill 79

In February, gang clashes over control of the country’s main prisons resulted in the deaths of 79 inmates in a single day. This violence was marked by terrible scenes, with beheaded corpses, revealing the power of drug trafficking gangs in these overcrowded establishments.

30% prison overcrowding

Ecuador has about 60 penitentiary centers with a capacity of 29,000 places. Overcrowding is around 30%, with 38,000 detainees, watched by 1,500 guards while, according to experts, it would take 4,000 for effective control. According to the Ombudsman, there has been “103 assassinations” in Ecuadorian prisons in 2020.

In an attempt to counter the violence in prison, ex-President Lenin Moreno, replaced in May by Guillermo Lasso, had declared a state of emergency several times, especially in 2020 for three months. Since the start of the pandemic, Ecuador has used alternative sentences for minor offenses to reduce its prison population and thus reduced prison overcrowding from 42% to 30%.

The World with AFP

" } ["wfw"]=> array(1) { ["commentrss"]=> string(84) "https://nysenewsupdates.com/ecuador-declares-state-of-emergency-in-its-prisons/feed/" } ["slash"]=> array(1) { ["comments"]=> string(1) "0" } ["summary"]=> string(108) "Ecuadorian soldiers near a prison in Cotopaxi province (center), Thursday, July 22, 2021. RODRIGO BUENDIA..." ["atom_content"]=> string(4665) "

After new deadly riots in Ecuador, President Guillermo Lasso decreed, Thursday, July 22, ” emergency state “ in the country’s prisons in order to ” restore order “. The latest official report shows 22 dead and sixty wounded.

“We are going to start a process of total restructuring of the prison system”, said the head of state from the province of Cotopaxi (center), where the majority of victims were recorded.

Guillermo Lasso announced that the army will henceforth be responsible for controlling access to prisons, while the police will guard the interior. Until now, the security of prisons has been ensured by civilian prison guards. The director of the prison administration has been replaced by a soldier.

79 dead in one day in February

The prison administration had suspended, earlier in the day, certain activities “Capable of endangering the prison population and administrative officials”. According to a source with the administration, visits have been suspended in some establishments.

According to the governor of Cotopaxi, Oswaldo Coronel, on Wednesday, the rioters “Used large caliber firearms, as well as explosives which caused extensive damage inside the penitentiary center”. Prisoners managed to escape at dawn on Thursday. 78 of them were caught by the police but it is not known how many detainees are still at large.

Article reserved for our subscribers Read also In Ecuador, mutinies in three prisons kill 79

In February, gang clashes over control of the country’s main prisons resulted in the deaths of 79 inmates in a single day. This violence was marked by terrible scenes, with beheaded corpses, revealing the power of drug trafficking gangs in these overcrowded establishments.

30% prison overcrowding

Ecuador has about 60 penitentiary centers with a capacity of 29,000 places. Overcrowding is around 30%, with 38,000 detainees, watched by 1,500 guards while, according to experts, it would take 4,000 for effective control. According to the Ombudsman, there has been “103 assassinations” in Ecuadorian prisons in 2020.

In an attempt to counter the violence in prison, ex-President Lenin Moreno, replaced in May by Guillermo Lasso, had declared a state of emergency several times, especially in 2020 for three months. Since the start of the pandemic, Ecuador has used alternative sentences for minor offenses to reduce its prison population and thus reduced prison overcrowding from 42% to 30%.

The World with AFP

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1627011609) } [2]=> array(14) { ["title"]=> string(43) "Mississippi wants to repeal abortion rights" ["link"]=> string(72) "https://nysenewsupdates.com/mississippi-wants-to-repeal-abortion-rights/" ["comments"]=> string(80) "https://nysenewsupdates.com/mississippi-wants-to-repeal-abortion-rights/#respond" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(11) "Susan Hally" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Fri, 23 Jul 2021 01:37:46 +0000" ["category"]=> string(39) "AmericasabortionMississippirepealrights" ["guid"]=> string(72) "https://nysenewsupdates.com/mississippi-wants-to-repeal-abortion-rights/" ["description"]=> string(102) "Anti-abortion activists outside the Supreme Court in Washington, June 29, 2020. NICHOLAS KAMM / AFP..." ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(4566) "

Mississippi has asked the US Supreme Court to repeal the federal right to abortion in the United States, in a court document filed Thursday, July 22.

The Supreme Court already agreed in May to consider a state law banning most abortions from the fifteenth week of pregnancy, even in cases of rape or incest.

Read also Abortion: the danger of the American retreat

As part of the proceedings, which the highest American court is due to consider in the fall for a decision in mid-2022, Mississippi Attorney General Lynn Fitch said Thursday that the judgments establishing the right to abortion were “Shockingly wrong”.

Abortion allowed up to 22 weeks

“This court should cancel Roe and Casey”, the two decisions taken respectively in 1973 and 1992, wrote the prosecutor, ruling that “The conclusion that abortion is a constitutional right has no basis”.

A petition ruled “Mind-boggling” by Nancy Northup, president of the Center for Reproductive Rights association, which defends the right to abortion. “Their goal is for the Supreme Court to take away our right to control our own bodies and our future.” not just in Mississippi, but everywhere ”, she hammered in a statement.

Usually, the Supreme Court refuses in the vast majority of cases to consider appeals challenging its judgment in Roe v. Wade, by which she recognized in 1973 a constitutional right to abortion, later specifying that women could abort as long as the fetus is “Not viable”, which corresponds to approximately 22 weeks of pregnancy.

Three out of nine progressive magistrates

But she agreed to take up this law of the State of Mississippi, yet blocked by the courts at first instance and then on appeal, suggesting that it could influence its previous decisions. The Court’s political balance shifted sharply to the conservative side after the appointment of three judges during Donald Trump’s tenure, leaving only three out of nine progressive magistrates.

Read also Abortion at the heart of the battle for the Supreme Court

According to experts, it is likely that the high court will not completely invalidate the Roe v. Wade, but diminishes its scope by providing more and more latitude to states to prohibit voluntary terminations of pregnancy, which risks increasing territorial disparities in the country.

The World with AFP

" } ["wfw"]=> array(1) { ["commentrss"]=> string(77) "https://nysenewsupdates.com/mississippi-wants-to-repeal-abortion-rights/feed/" } ["slash"]=> array(1) { ["comments"]=> string(1) "0" } ["summary"]=> string(102) "Anti-abortion activists outside the Supreme Court in Washington, June 29, 2020. NICHOLAS KAMM / AFP..." ["atom_content"]=> string(4566) "

Mississippi has asked the US Supreme Court to repeal the federal right to abortion in the United States, in a court document filed Thursday, July 22.

The Supreme Court already agreed in May to consider a state law banning most abortions from the fifteenth week of pregnancy, even in cases of rape or incest.

Read also Abortion: the danger of the American retreat

As part of the proceedings, which the highest American court is due to consider in the fall for a decision in mid-2022, Mississippi Attorney General Lynn Fitch said Thursday that the judgments establishing the right to abortion were “Shockingly wrong”.

Abortion allowed up to 22 weeks

“This court should cancel Roe and Casey”, the two decisions taken respectively in 1973 and 1992, wrote the prosecutor, ruling that “The conclusion that abortion is a constitutional right has no basis”.

A petition ruled “Mind-boggling” by Nancy Northup, president of the Center for Reproductive Rights association, which defends the right to abortion. “Their goal is for the Supreme Court to take away our right to control our own bodies and our future.” not just in Mississippi, but everywhere ”, she hammered in a statement.

Usually, the Supreme Court refuses in the vast majority of cases to consider appeals challenging its judgment in Roe v. Wade, by which she recognized in 1973 a constitutional right to abortion, later specifying that women could abort as long as the fetus is “Not viable”, which corresponds to approximately 22 weeks of pregnancy.

Three out of nine progressive magistrates

But she agreed to take up this law of the State of Mississippi, yet blocked by the courts at first instance and then on appeal, suggesting that it could influence its previous decisions. The Court’s political balance shifted sharply to the conservative side after the appointment of three judges during Donald Trump’s tenure, leaving only three out of nine progressive magistrates.

Read also Abortion at the heart of the battle for the Supreme Court

According to experts, it is likely that the high court will not completely invalidate the Roe v. Wade, but diminishes its scope by providing more and more latitude to states to prohibit voluntary terminations of pregnancy, which risks increasing territorial disparities in the country.

The World with AFP

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1627004266) } [3]=> array(14) { ["title"]=> string(50) "The bankruptcy of the Special Tribunal for Lebanon" ["link"]=> string(79) "https://nysenewsupdates.com/the-bankruptcy-of-the-special-tribunal-for-lebanon/" ["comments"]=> string(87) "https://nysenewsupdates.com/the-bankruptcy-of-the-special-tribunal-for-lebanon/#respond" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(11) "Susan Hally" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Fri, 23 Jul 2021 00:52:54 +0000" ["category"]=> string(45) "InternationalbankruptcyLebanonSpecialTribunal" ["guid"]=> string(79) "https://nysenewsupdates.com/the-bankruptcy-of-the-special-tribunal-for-lebanon/" ["description"]=> string(93) "A copy of the “founding text” of the Special Tribunal for Lebanon at the grave..." ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(4198) "

The Special Tribunal for Lebanon (STL) asked the United Nations Security Council on July 13 to rule on the follow-up to the ongoing trials. Charged with trying the perpetrators of terrorist attacks committed in the 2000s against Lebanese political leaders and journalists, the STL no longer has the financial means to continue its trials beyond July 31, its officials say. Governed by an agreement signed between the Lebanese government and the UN in June 2007, the STL is 51% funded by voluntary contributions from states, including France, meeting within a management committee chaired by the British. The remaining 49% is the responsibility of Lebanon.

The settlement of the annual bill has always sparked heated debates in Beirut, but this time, it was the economic crisis that got the better of Lebanon’s participation. And not the political games that, in the past, had forced the government to settle its quota on special funds to bypass Parliament, where Hezbollah deputies, whose members were targeted by the Tribunal, gave voice . Formerly volunteers, the other states, Westerners and Gulf countries, have also left the ship.

Read also The Special Tribunal for Lebanon threatened by the financial crisis shaking the country

To close, however, the two cases still pending in Leidschendam, a suburb of The Hague, in the Netherlands, where this court sits, must be liquidated. One concerns the appeal filed by the prosecutor and the defense against the judgment rendered in August 2020 in the attack against former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafic Hariri on February 14, 2005 in Beirut. Only one of the four defendants, Salim Ayyash, had been convicted. In the second case, it is the same man, a member of Hezbollah, who is being prosecuted in absentia, for his responsibility in the attempted attacks against the former minister, Marwan Hamadé in October 2014, against the politician and businessman Elias Murr in July 2005, and in the assassination of George Hawi in an attack committed in June 2005.

Article reserved for our subscribers Read also Attack against Rafic Hariri: the conviction of a member of Hezbollah leaves many gray areas

The trial, which should have started on June 16, has been suspended for lack of funds. The judges must now decide the follow-up to the case, but have decided to refer the matter to the UN. “The Special Court was established by a resolution of the United Nations Security Council, the future of the Special Court must therefore be determined by the Security Council”, they write in a July 13 decision, sent to the United Nations. This scenario has long been feared in New York: it would force the capitals, including Paris and Washington, at the origin of this tribunal, to interfere directly in legal proceedings.

You have 61.18% of this article to read. The rest is for subscribers only.

" } ["wfw"]=> array(1) { ["commentrss"]=> string(84) "https://nysenewsupdates.com/the-bankruptcy-of-the-special-tribunal-for-lebanon/feed/" } ["slash"]=> array(1) { ["comments"]=> string(1) "0" } ["summary"]=> string(93) "A copy of the “founding text” of the Special Tribunal for Lebanon at the grave..." ["atom_content"]=> string(4198) "

The Special Tribunal for Lebanon (STL) asked the United Nations Security Council on July 13 to rule on the follow-up to the ongoing trials. Charged with trying the perpetrators of terrorist attacks committed in the 2000s against Lebanese political leaders and journalists, the STL no longer has the financial means to continue its trials beyond July 31, its officials say. Governed by an agreement signed between the Lebanese government and the UN in June 2007, the STL is 51% funded by voluntary contributions from states, including France, meeting within a management committee chaired by the British. The remaining 49% is the responsibility of Lebanon.

The settlement of the annual bill has always sparked heated debates in Beirut, but this time, it was the economic crisis that got the better of Lebanon’s participation. And not the political games that, in the past, had forced the government to settle its quota on special funds to bypass Parliament, where Hezbollah deputies, whose members were targeted by the Tribunal, gave voice . Formerly volunteers, the other states, Westerners and Gulf countries, have also left the ship.

Read also The Special Tribunal for Lebanon threatened by the financial crisis shaking the country

To close, however, the two cases still pending in Leidschendam, a suburb of The Hague, in the Netherlands, where this court sits, must be liquidated. One concerns the appeal filed by the prosecutor and the defense against the judgment rendered in August 2020 in the attack against former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafic Hariri on February 14, 2005 in Beirut. Only one of the four defendants, Salim Ayyash, had been convicted. In the second case, it is the same man, a member of Hezbollah, who is being prosecuted in absentia, for his responsibility in the attempted attacks against the former minister, Marwan Hamadé in October 2014, against the politician and businessman Elias Murr in July 2005, and in the assassination of George Hawi in an attack committed in June 2005.

Article reserved for our subscribers Read also Attack against Rafic Hariri: the conviction of a member of Hezbollah leaves many gray areas

The trial, which should have started on June 16, has been suspended for lack of funds. The judges must now decide the follow-up to the case, but have decided to refer the matter to the UN. “The Special Court was established by a resolution of the United Nations Security Council, the future of the Special Court must therefore be determined by the Security Council”, they write in a July 13 decision, sent to the United Nations. This scenario has long been feared in New York: it would force the capitals, including Paris and Washington, at the origin of this tribunal, to interfere directly in legal proceedings.

You have 61.18% of this article to read. The rest is for subscribers only.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1627001574) } [4]=> array(14) { ["title"]=> string(76) "France tries to verify if Emmanuel Macron’s laptop has been “infected”" ["link"]=> string(96) "https://nysenewsupdates.com/france-tries-to-verify-if-emmanuel-macrons-laptop-has-been-infected/" ["comments"]=> string(104) "https://nysenewsupdates.com/france-tries-to-verify-if-emmanuel-macrons-laptop-has-been-infected/#respond" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(11) "Susan Hally" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Thu, 22 Jul 2021 18:43:46 +0000" ["category"]=> string(54) "InternationalEmmanuelFranceinfectedlaptopMacronsverify" ["guid"]=> string(96) "https://nysenewsupdates.com/france-tries-to-verify-if-emmanuel-macrons-laptop-has-been-infected/" ["description"]=> string(91) "Emmanuel Macron and his two phones, in November 2017 during a European summit in Sweden...." ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(3567) "

After being taken aback, the Elysee tries to show that the matter is under control. Two days after the revelations by the organization Forbidden Stories and Amnesty International with sixteen international media, including The world, of the presence of Emmanuel Macron’s phone among the potential targets of the Pegasus spyware, the Head of State tried to regain control, by convening, Thursday, July 22, an “exceptional” defense council dedicated to this case.

At the end of this meeting, the Elysee Palace announced that, out of prudence, “The president himself changed telephone and telephone number for certain exchanges”. “A certain number of security protocols have been readjusted, in particular around the President of the Republic”, government spokesman Gabriel Attal said, explaining that this meeting had “Allowed to have a stopover point” on ongoing investigations.

“Caution remains in order”

Because, if a phone of Mr. Macron was indeed among the potential targets of Pegasus, the top of the state is continuing its verification operations to determine whether this device has indeed been “Infected”. For the moment, “No certainty at this stage has emerged, so caution remains in order”, ensures the Elysee. Journalistic investigation “Does not say if any data has been ‘removed’ from it, and so this is what is being looked at”, Mr. Attal said. In the meantime, Mr. Macron “Is following this file as closely as possible and takes this matter very seriously”, emphasizes those around him.

The president “never communicated sensitive information on a potentially spyable phone”, assures Gabriel Attal, spokesman of the government

While Israeli spyware was allegedly used by Moroccan intelligence services to hack Mr. Macron’s phone, executive says it wants “Proceed in order”, before possibly publicly implicating Rabat. “We must already see if his phone has been infected, if there is indeed a link with Morocco, then know if we assume to make it a subject of diplomatic crisis with this country. We are not there yet ”, explains a close friend of the head of state World. For its part, Morocco has promised an investigation into the “unfounded accusations” according to which it used the software of the Israeli firm NSO Group for espionage purposes.

You have 46.78% of this article to read. The rest is for subscribers only.

" } ["wfw"]=> array(1) { ["commentrss"]=> string(101) "https://nysenewsupdates.com/france-tries-to-verify-if-emmanuel-macrons-laptop-has-been-infected/feed/" } ["slash"]=> array(1) { ["comments"]=> string(1) "0" } ["summary"]=> string(91) "Emmanuel Macron and his two phones, in November 2017 during a European summit in Sweden...." ["atom_content"]=> string(3567) "

After being taken aback, the Elysee tries to show that the matter is under control. Two days after the revelations by the organization Forbidden Stories and Amnesty International with sixteen international media, including The world, of the presence of Emmanuel Macron’s phone among the potential targets of the Pegasus spyware, the Head of State tried to regain control, by convening, Thursday, July 22, an “exceptional” defense council dedicated to this case.

At the end of this meeting, the Elysee Palace announced that, out of prudence, “The president himself changed telephone and telephone number for certain exchanges”. “A certain number of security protocols have been readjusted, in particular around the President of the Republic”, government spokesman Gabriel Attal said, explaining that this meeting had “Allowed to have a stopover point” on ongoing investigations.

“Caution remains in order”

Because, if a phone of Mr. Macron was indeed among the potential targets of Pegasus, the top of the state is continuing its verification operations to determine whether this device has indeed been “Infected”. For the moment, “No certainty at this stage has emerged, so caution remains in order”, ensures the Elysee. Journalistic investigation “Does not say if any data has been ‘removed’ from it, and so this is what is being looked at”, Mr. Attal said. In the meantime, Mr. Macron “Is following this file as closely as possible and takes this matter very seriously”, emphasizes those around him.

The president “never communicated sensitive information on a potentially spyable phone”, assures Gabriel Attal, spokesman of the government

While Israeli spyware was allegedly used by Moroccan intelligence services to hack Mr. Macron’s phone, executive says it wants “Proceed in order”, before possibly publicly implicating Rabat. “We must already see if his phone has been infected, if there is indeed a link with Morocco, then know if we assume to make it a subject of diplomatic crisis with this country. We are not there yet ”, explains a close friend of the head of state World. For its part, Morocco has promised an investigation into the “unfounded accusations” according to which it used the software of the Israeli firm NSO Group for espionage purposes.

You have 46.78% of this article to read. The rest is for subscribers only.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1626979426) } [5]=> array(14) { ["title"]=> string(49) "At the Tokyo Olympics, African athletes to follow" ["link"]=> string(77) "https://nysenewsupdates.com/at-the-tokyo-olympics-african-athletes-to-follow/" ["comments"]=> string(85) "https://nysenewsupdates.com/at-the-tokyo-olympics-african-athletes-to-follow/#respond" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(11) "Susan Hally" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Thu, 22 Jul 2021 17:43:02 +0000" ["category"]=> string(47) "InternationalAfricanathletesfollowOlympicsTokyo" ["guid"]=> string(77) "https://nysenewsupdates.com/at-the-tokyo-olympics-african-athletes-to-follow/" ["description"]=> string(91) "To stay up to date on African news, subscribe to the “Monde Afrique” newsletter from..." ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(10534) "

To stay up to date on African news, subscribe to the “Monde Afrique” newsletter from this link. Every Saturday at 6 am, find a week of current events and debates treated by the editorial staff of “Monde Afrique”.

The Olympic Stadium of the Tokyo Games, July 22, 2021.

Five years ago, in Rio de Janeiro, eleven African countries (Nigeria, Kenya, South Africa, Ethiopia, Côte d’Ivoire, Algeria, Burundi, Niger, Egypt, Tunisia and Morocco) left South America with medals. Kenya offered itself the biggest harvest with thirteen awards, six of which were gold.

Article reserved for our subscribers Read also Uncertain and unprecedented summer Olympics, under the sign of Covid-19

This year in Tokyo, the continent’s main chances of winning medals lie in athletics, where Kenyans and Ethiopians are among the top specialists in the world, but also in boxing, martial arts and swimming. Here are some athletes that will have to be followed closely during this Olympic fortnight.

Players of the Nigerian men's basketball team on July 10 in Las Vegas.

Nigeria took over from Angola at the top of the African men’s basketball hierarchy. The D’Tigers, who will participate in their third consecutive Olympics, clearly displayed their ambitions by beating the United States in a friendly match in Las Vegas (90-87) on July 10.

Placed in a difficult group, with Germany, Australia and Italy, the Nigerians, however, have some arguments to advance. The backbone of the selection is mostly made up of players playing in the American NBA, including Precious Achiuwa (Miami Heat), Josh Okogie (Minnesota Timberwolves) and the talented – but fragile because regularly injured – Jahlil Okafor (Detroit Pistons) or in the best European championships (Spain, Italy).

The team, a mixture of youth and experience, has been coached since February 2020 by the American Mike Brown (51), the former coach of the Los Angeles Lakers and the Cleveland Cavaliers. With him, Nigeria has reached a milestone and the Tokyo scene could be the confirmation.

Tunisian Ons Jabeur at the Wimbledon tournament, July 5, 2021.

Eighth finalist at Roland Garros, then quarter-finalist at Wimbledon, but also winner of the Birmingham tournament – his first title on the WTA circuit – Ons Jabeur (26) is going through a prosperous period. The player from Tunisia, who now occupies the 23e world rank, represents a real hope for a medal for his country. In 2016, in Rio de Janeiro, she had failed to pass the first round.

Since then, Ons Jabeur has improved a lot in his game, but also mentally. The Tunisian repeats over and over again her intention to join the world top 10 by the end of the year. His latest results were obtained on Parisian clay and on English turf. The hard surface of the Ariake Coliseum in Tokyo shouldn’t be an insurmountable obstacle.

Kenyan Eliud Kipchoge at the Enschede Marathon, the Netherlands on April 18, 2021.

Of course, Eliud Kipchoge (36) is five years older than when he won the gold medal in the marathon in Rio in 2 h 8 min 44 s. But time does not seem to have (too) a hold on the performance of the athlete from Kenya, a specialist in long distance races.

The proof ? His victory, in April, at the Enschede marathon (Netherlands), where the 2016 Olympic champion silenced all skeptics with a time (2 h 4 min 30 s) better than that achieved in Brazil. His disappointing performance in October 2020 in London, where the Kenyan had only obtained a modest eighth place, seems to be a distant memory.

In Tokyo, he will be a candidate for his own succession. Eliud Kipchoge, who is a real star in his country, has never stopped forcing himself to intensive training – he runs an average of 250 kilometers per week – and leads an almost monastic life, made up of reading, sleeping and frugal and almost always identical meals. A recipe that has already proven itself.

Algerian karateka Lamya Matoub (right) in Madrid, November 10, 2018.

Eliminated during the karate qualifying tournament, a discipline that will make its appearance this year at the Olympics, she should not have been present in Tokyo. But Lamya Matoub (29) was drafted by invitation – because she is one of the three best African sportsmen of the year – and she represents one of the main chances of medals for Algeria.

Born in France, where she works as a school teacher, she finally decided to represent her country of origin, with some success so far. She was notably world champion in 2017 in Wroclaw (Poland), in the 68 kg category, and also won the gold medal at the 2015 African Games and the 2018 African Karate Championships.

Results that make her one of the main candidates for Olympic gold. A goal perfectly assumed by the athlete, who has repeatedly ensured that she was aiming for the top step of the podium.

South African swimmer Chad le Clos in Gwangju, South Korea on July 26, 2019.

Once again, Chad le Clos will be one of the many swimmers to be expected in Tokyo. At 29, the athlete born in South Africa already has an Olympic record that says a lot about his status.

In 2012, in London, when he was only 20 years old, Chad le Clos had achieved a resounding performance by winning gold in the 200-meter freestyle, ahead of the American Michael Phelps. Four years later, he left Brazil with two silver medals (200 meters freestyle and 100 meters) around his neck.

Since then, the athlete has won several significant titles, including that of world champion in the 200 meters freestyle in 2017. By trying – why not – to approach, or even to break the Olympic record still held by Michael Phelps in 2008 in Beijing (1 min 42 s 96).

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To stay up to date on African news, subscribe to the “Monde Afrique” newsletter from this link. Every Saturday at 6 am, find a week of current events and debates treated by the editorial staff of “Monde Afrique”.

The Olympic Stadium of the Tokyo Games, July 22, 2021.

Five years ago, in Rio de Janeiro, eleven African countries (Nigeria, Kenya, South Africa, Ethiopia, Côte d’Ivoire, Algeria, Burundi, Niger, Egypt, Tunisia and Morocco) left South America with medals. Kenya offered itself the biggest harvest with thirteen awards, six of which were gold.

Article reserved for our subscribers Read also Uncertain and unprecedented summer Olympics, under the sign of Covid-19

This year in Tokyo, the continent’s main chances of winning medals lie in athletics, where Kenyans and Ethiopians are among the top specialists in the world, but also in boxing, martial arts and swimming. Here are some athletes that will have to be followed closely during this Olympic fortnight.

Players of the Nigerian men's basketball team on July 10 in Las Vegas.

Nigeria took over from Angola at the top of the African men’s basketball hierarchy. The D’Tigers, who will participate in their third consecutive Olympics, clearly displayed their ambitions by beating the United States in a friendly match in Las Vegas (90-87) on July 10.

Placed in a difficult group, with Germany, Australia and Italy, the Nigerians, however, have some arguments to advance. The backbone of the selection is mostly made up of players playing in the American NBA, including Precious Achiuwa (Miami Heat), Josh Okogie (Minnesota Timberwolves) and the talented – but fragile because regularly injured – Jahlil Okafor (Detroit Pistons) or in the best European championships (Spain, Italy).

The team, a mixture of youth and experience, has been coached since February 2020 by the American Mike Brown (51), the former coach of the Los Angeles Lakers and the Cleveland Cavaliers. With him, Nigeria has reached a milestone and the Tokyo scene could be the confirmation.

Tunisian Ons Jabeur at the Wimbledon tournament, July 5, 2021.

Eighth finalist at Roland Garros, then quarter-finalist at Wimbledon, but also winner of the Birmingham tournament – his first title on the WTA circuit – Ons Jabeur (26) is going through a prosperous period. The player from Tunisia, who now occupies the 23e world rank, represents a real hope for a medal for his country. In 2016, in Rio de Janeiro, she had failed to pass the first round.

Since then, Ons Jabeur has improved a lot in his game, but also mentally. The Tunisian repeats over and over again her intention to join the world top 10 by the end of the year. His latest results were obtained on Parisian clay and on English turf. The hard surface of the Ariake Coliseum in Tokyo shouldn’t be an insurmountable obstacle.

Kenyan Eliud Kipchoge at the Enschede Marathon, the Netherlands on April 18, 2021.

Of course, Eliud Kipchoge (36) is five years older than when he won the gold medal in the marathon in Rio in 2 h 8 min 44 s. But time does not seem to have (too) a hold on the performance of the athlete from Kenya, a specialist in long distance races.

The proof ? His victory, in April, at the Enschede marathon (Netherlands), where the 2016 Olympic champion silenced all skeptics with a time (2 h 4 min 30 s) better than that achieved in Brazil. His disappointing performance in October 2020 in London, where the Kenyan had only obtained a modest eighth place, seems to be a distant memory.

In Tokyo, he will be a candidate for his own succession. Eliud Kipchoge, who is a real star in his country, has never stopped forcing himself to intensive training – he runs an average of 250 kilometers per week – and leads an almost monastic life, made up of reading, sleeping and frugal and almost always identical meals. A recipe that has already proven itself.

Algerian karateka Lamya Matoub (right) in Madrid, November 10, 2018.

Eliminated during the karate qualifying tournament, a discipline that will make its appearance this year at the Olympics, she should not have been present in Tokyo. But Lamya Matoub (29) was drafted by invitation – because she is one of the three best African sportsmen of the year – and she represents one of the main chances of medals for Algeria.

Born in France, where she works as a school teacher, she finally decided to represent her country of origin, with some success so far. She was notably world champion in 2017 in Wroclaw (Poland), in the 68 kg category, and also won the gold medal at the 2015 African Games and the 2018 African Karate Championships.

Results that make her one of the main candidates for Olympic gold. A goal perfectly assumed by the athlete, who has repeatedly ensured that she was aiming for the top step of the podium.

South African swimmer Chad le Clos in Gwangju, South Korea on July 26, 2019.

Once again, Chad le Clos will be one of the many swimmers to be expected in Tokyo. At 29, the athlete born in South Africa already has an Olympic record that says a lot about his status.

In 2012, in London, when he was only 20 years old, Chad le Clos had achieved a resounding performance by winning gold in the 200-meter freestyle, ahead of the American Michael Phelps. Four years later, he left Brazil with two silver medals (200 meters freestyle and 100 meters) around his neck.

Since then, the athlete has won several significant titles, including that of world champion in the 200 meters freestyle in 2017. By trying – why not – to approach, or even to break the Olympic record still held by Michael Phelps in 2008 in Beijing (1 min 42 s 96).

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1626975782) } [6]=> array(14) { ["title"]=> string(92) "When “Kiki” Caron came close to the “diplomatic incident” at the Tokyo Games in 1964" ["link"]=> string(109) "https://nysenewsupdates.com/when-kiki-caron-came-close-to-the-diplomatic-incident-at-the-tokyo-games-in-1964/" ["comments"]=> string(117) "https://nysenewsupdates.com/when-kiki-caron-came-close-to-the-diplomatic-incident-at-the-tokyo-games-in-1964/#respond" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(11) "Susan Hally" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Thu, 22 Jul 2021 17:00:03 +0000" ["category"]=> string(54) "Asia PacificCaroncloseDiplomaticGamesIncidentKikiTokyo" ["guid"]=> string(109) "https://nysenewsupdates.com/when-kiki-caron-came-close-to-the-diplomatic-incident-at-the-tokyo-games-in-1964/" ["description"]=> string(90) "During the opening ceremony of the Tokyo Games, in the old National Stadium, on October..." ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(4042) "

Ask “Kiki” Caron for her memories of the 1964 Olympic Games in Tokyo, and the silver medalist, French star at the time, will tell you a little about swimming, and a lot about Japan. “I almost caused a diplomatic incident! “, remembers Christine by her first name, then 16 years old. In question, an intrusion into the lodge of a “To be untouchable”, there: Emperor Hirohito, at the National Olympic Stadium, during the athletics events.

“I wanted to see Bob Hayes’ 100 meters [champion olympique et ancien recordman du monde de la discipline] and I was afraid of missing it, so I ran to get into a lodge. “ Without knowing who it belonged to. “There was security already, of course, but maybe not as much as it is now. Guards eventually took me out. “

Article reserved for our subscribers Read also The cult of Olympism, Japan’s revenge on history

Two decades after the Second World War, the atmosphere in the Olympic Village is “The party permanently” and a form of recklessness, assures Jacqueline Gaugey-Brisepierre, 75 years old. The Frenchwoman then took part in artistic gymnastics competitions. For the opening of its first Summer Games, Japan wanted “An astonishing and grandiose ceremony”. The gymnast still has in mind, ” like it was yesterday “, this Olympic flame. To wear it, a young man born on August 6, 1945, the day of the bombing of Hiroshima by the American air force. In the air, “Five air force planes traced the five Olympic rings”.

“Equipment that did not exist in France”

For the first time, the Games, in which officially no professional athlete participates, have the right to be broadcast on mondovision television. ” Every day, remembers Kiki Caron, 73 years old today. A postal bag of letters was waiting for me at the entrance to the Olympic Village. ” The high school student is enjoying life and the twist in the Olympic Village. “There was a sort of nightclub. A very good-natured atmosphere. When I finished my tests, I was allowed to go. “ Between athletes, discussions are often held in English. “We understood each other. “

The French delegation has several points of reference, such as the presence on site of journalist Georges de Caunes, famous voice of the ORTF, responsible for publishing for the occasion a mini-newspaper for the Blues. And that “Of French cooks [leur] making food “, also recalls the former judoka Jacques Le Berre, 83 years old. At the time, the French teams were still largely male; 120 men, 22 women. All countries combined, there are barely 13% of women among all participants.

You have 38.53% of this article to read. The rest is for subscribers only.

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Ask “Kiki” Caron for her memories of the 1964 Olympic Games in Tokyo, and the silver medalist, French star at the time, will tell you a little about swimming, and a lot about Japan. “I almost caused a diplomatic incident! “, remembers Christine by her first name, then 16 years old. In question, an intrusion into the lodge of a “To be untouchable”, there: Emperor Hirohito, at the National Olympic Stadium, during the athletics events.

“I wanted to see Bob Hayes’ 100 meters [champion olympique et ancien recordman du monde de la discipline] and I was afraid of missing it, so I ran to get into a lodge. “ Without knowing who it belonged to. “There was security already, of course, but maybe not as much as it is now. Guards eventually took me out. “

Article reserved for our subscribers Read also The cult of Olympism, Japan’s revenge on history

Two decades after the Second World War, the atmosphere in the Olympic Village is “The party permanently” and a form of recklessness, assures Jacqueline Gaugey-Brisepierre, 75 years old. The Frenchwoman then took part in artistic gymnastics competitions. For the opening of its first Summer Games, Japan wanted “An astonishing and grandiose ceremony”. The gymnast still has in mind, ” like it was yesterday “, this Olympic flame. To wear it, a young man born on August 6, 1945, the day of the bombing of Hiroshima by the American air force. In the air, “Five air force planes traced the five Olympic rings”.

“Equipment that did not exist in France”

For the first time, the Games, in which officially no professional athlete participates, have the right to be broadcast on mondovision television. ” Every day, remembers Kiki Caron, 73 years old today. A postal bag of letters was waiting for me at the entrance to the Olympic Village. ” The high school student is enjoying life and the twist in the Olympic Village. “There was a sort of nightclub. A very good-natured atmosphere. When I finished my tests, I was allowed to go. “ Between athletes, discussions are often held in English. “We understood each other. “

The French delegation has several points of reference, such as the presence on site of journalist Georges de Caunes, famous voice of the ORTF, responsible for publishing for the occasion a mini-newspaper for the Blues. And that “Of French cooks [leur] making food “, also recalls the former judoka Jacques Le Berre, 83 years old. At the time, the French teams were still largely male; 120 men, 22 women. All countries combined, there are barely 13% of women among all participants.

You have 38.53% of this article to read. The rest is for subscribers only.

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To stay up to date with African news, subscribe to the “Monde Afrique” newsletter from this link. Every Saturday at 6 am, find a week of current events and debates treated by the editorial staff of “Monde Afrique”.

Screening of “Journey to Kenya” in the garden of the Sudan Film Factory in Khartoum, July 18, 2021. Under the Al-Bashir regime, when cinemas had closed their doors, many people gathered to watch films as a group: “We played with the wolves,” says Tallal Afifi ironically.

In the basements of the Al-Wahda cinema (“unity” in Arabic), Tallal Afifi unrolls film strips covered with dust. In the half-light, he stumbles over old account books and shattered boxes of tickets. Outside, the big screen is stained with gray stains, a few rusty chairs still stand on the stands, converted in places into warehouses of bananas and corn cobs for neighboring grocery stores. For the founder of the Sudan Film Factory, an association that tries to revive film culture in Sudan, the ruins of Al-Wahda are the allegory of an industry “Buried alive”.

Episode 8 In South Sudan, Juba cinema has gone through the tumultuous history of the young country

Inaugurated in 1974, this open-air theater in the Kober district, in the north of Khartoum, screened Sudanese, Chinese, Korean and Egyptian films. During this golden age, the 16 cinemas in the capital could accommodate more than 40,000 spectators per evening. “Even football didn’t attract so many people. Cinema was part of everyday life, mixing social classes. People met here, argued, flirted, talked about business, before and after the session ”, says the former film critic, a glimmer of nostalgia in his eyes.

“The cinema was considered a threat”

At the time of independence in 1956, Sudan was one of the pioneers of cinema in Africa. Avant-garde Gadallah Gubara made the first African color film in 1955, The Song of Khartoum, a prelude to many Sudanese feature films screened in the following years in the sixty cinemas of the unified Sudan, before the industry fell into disrepair.

Already, under the dictatorship of Gaafar Nimeiry (1969-1985), film productions were tightly controlled by the authorities. “The censors were scrupulous, in the name of preserving community sensitivities”, recalls Tallal Afifi. But the worst was to come. After a brief democratic episode, the military-Islamist coup of 1989, which marked the advent of the reign of Omar Al-Bashir and the National Congress Party, has definitely brought down the curtain on the Sudanese film scene.

Episode 1 Ivory Coast: in Abidjan, on the trail of old cinemas

“Like all artistic events, the cinema was considered a threat. Bringing the masses together outside of political meetings was not to the taste of the authorities ”, explains the founder of the Sudan Film Factory. The establishment of a night curfew from 1989 to 1995 signed the death sentence for open-air theaters, which closed one after the other. Distributors and producers ended up completely deserting the country from 1997 when, another coup de grace, American and European economic sanctions were imposed on the Islamist regime for its policy deemed complacent with regard to terrorism.

“Sudan has lived thirty years of isolation”, asserts Suleiman Ibrahim, a 65-year-old filmmaker trained in Moscow in the 1970s. Most of the directors of his generation went into exile. For those who, like him, have stayed, “The pressure of the regime on our shoulders was enormous, we were constantly in the sights of the security services”, he recalls.

For two years, the renewal

Suleiman Ibrahim’s mustache and his facetious demeanor are not unknown to European moviegoers. With three others “Comrades in misfortune”, they tried to rehabilitate the old cinema in the Thawra district, in the north of Khartoum, without ever obtaining the necessary authorizations. Their futile struggle was immortalized in the film Talking about Trees, directed by Suhaib Gasmelbari, who won the award for best documentary at the Berlin film festival in 2019. As a symbol, it is a film about cinema that has revived the machine.

Great paradox of this stammering awakening, Sudanese films applauded by foreign critics are not shown in Sudan

For two years, a renewal has been at work. Some movies like Khartoum Offside by Marwa Zein, or more recently You will die at 20, by Amjad Abu Alala, have toured international festivals, winning numerous awards. ” These films once again put the country in the spotlight, arousing the curiosity of audiences abroad ”, welcomes Tallal Afifi who participated in the production of Amjad Abu Alala’s film.

Tallal Afifi holds old damaged films in his hands, at the Al-Wahda cinema, in Khartoum, Sudan, on July 15, 2021: “It's sad isn't it?  These tapes were happiness and joy for the people.  Today they are reduced to dust.

For a whole generation of young filmmakers who have cut their teeth more or less clandestinely over the past ten years, the popular uprising that began in December 2018 – leading to the fall of the Al-Bashir regime a few months later – opened a new space of freedoms. «

It was a happy coincidence. It was not the actual revolution that encouraged film production. Most of the directors had already started shooting with the means at hand since the Internet boom. But current events have made it possible to take a new look at these films, giving them depth ”, says Tallal Afifi.

Great paradox of this stammering awakening, Sudanese films applauded by foreign critics are not shown in Sudan. For Tallal Afifi, this is one of the major challenges to be taken up. At 43, this passionate dream of arousing a new popular craze for the seventh art. Invited to the “Filmfest” in Munich in 2008, he was inspired by the Iraqi documentary Life after the Fall by Kasim Abid who won the first prize. “I recognized the Sudan there, with its dictatorship, its two rivers, its religions which kill each other. I said to myself that if this director could shoot with a handheld camera and win a prize, we too had our chance », He explains.

Episode 2 In northern Nigeria, the conservative Kannywood cinema

Returning to Khartoum after a brief year of exile in Cairo, he set up the Sudan Film Factory in 2009, with the support of the Goethe Institute. His association, which organizes an independent film festival, has already provided training to more than 300 students in various film professions. This July day, in the premises of the association, located in a villa in a wealthy district of the capital, a hundred people came to attend the screening of two Sudanese films. Sitting in the middle of the garden on rows of plastic chairs, spectators wear the mask. Another hard blow, the Covid-19 epidemic has slowed the pace of projections.

“It’s resourcefulness”

At the end of the screening, Ibrahim Muhammad, one of the directors, performs the show, narrating the film’s background and answering the spectators’ questions. “In Sudan, you have to produce your films on your own. There is no institution capable of financing them. It’s resourcefulness, we train friends in sound recording », says the filmmaker, who started filming six years ago and has now created a small independent production company.

“Interest in Sudanese cinema is growing, but this needs to be translated into investments. We need money to develop local production companies, but especially infrastructure. We are sorely lacking professional studios ”, he concludes.

Due to a lack of resources, this new Sudanese scene makes more of short films or documentaries. International sanctions, about to be lifted, still make it difficult to purchase spare parts or software updates. Some make the trip by plane to Dubai or Saudi Arabia, their hard drives in their pockets.

Episode 5 Thomas Sankara’s cinema continues to make Burkinabés dream

Since the fall of Al-Bashir, Ibrahim Muhammad has become optimistic. “We have lived thirty years of emptiness; thirty years of destruction of art; thirty years of brainwashing. The cinema is now seen as haram, inappropriate, useless. We, the directors, play an important role in unraveling everything that the old regime put in place. We can change the looks ”, he hopes, before adding that the revolution “Is still incomplete”.

This young director had his equipment confiscated while he was covering the peaceful sit-in which was installed in front of the army headquarters in April 2019. He deplores the presence of many generals of the previous regime in the instances of transition. “For months, everyone improvised as a director. Art was everywhere. We have so many hidden stories to reveal, to put into pictures ”, he dreams. For this new generation of lovers of the seventh art, Sudanese cinema has started up again and nothing will be able to stop it.

African cinemas

The World Africa and his correspondents went to meet African cinemas. Those of a lost golden age as in Ivory Coast or Algeria where, a few decades ago, we thronged in the dark rooms to discover the latest action films or rediscover the classics of national creation.

“Cinemas did not survive the switch from analog to digital” of the early 2000s, regrets the Ivorian film critic Yacouba Sangaré. There as elsewhere, the seventh art had to take side roads to continue to reach its audience. Video stores – from VHS tapes to DVDs – have nurtured a generation of moviegoers.

Some today are trying to revive mythical venues and their demanding programming, as in Morocco or Burkina Faso. Others see in the series a new mode of fertile creation. From fans of the Tangier film library to the conservative cinema of Kannywood, in northern Nigeria, they make African cinema today.

Episode 1 Ivory Coast: in Abidjan, on the trail of the cinemas of yesteryear
Episode 2 In northern Nigeria, the conservative Kannywood cinema
Episode 3 Isabelle Kabano, Rwanda on edge
Episode 4 In Cameroon, the purchase of four local films by Netflix gives hope to the cinema sector
Episode 5 Thomas Sankara’s cinema continues to make Burkinabés dream
Episode 6 The Tangier cinematheque wants to restore the taste of the seventh art to Moroccans
Episode 7 In Algeria, the impossible rehabilitation of cinemas
Episode 8 In South Sudan, Juba cinema has gone through the tumultuous history of the young country
Episode 9 In Sudan, cinema in search of a new lease of life after the revolution

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To stay up to date with African news, subscribe to the “Monde Afrique” newsletter from this link. Every Saturday at 6 am, find a week of current events and debates treated by the editorial staff of “Monde Afrique”.

Screening of “Journey to Kenya” in the garden of the Sudan Film Factory in Khartoum, July 18, 2021. Under the Al-Bashir regime, when cinemas had closed their doors, many people gathered to watch films as a group: “We played with the wolves,” says Tallal Afifi ironically.

In the basements of the Al-Wahda cinema (“unity” in Arabic), Tallal Afifi unrolls film strips covered with dust. In the half-light, he stumbles over old account books and shattered boxes of tickets. Outside, the big screen is stained with gray stains, a few rusty chairs still stand on the stands, converted in places into warehouses of bananas and corn cobs for neighboring grocery stores. For the founder of the Sudan Film Factory, an association that tries to revive film culture in Sudan, the ruins of Al-Wahda are the allegory of an industry “Buried alive”.

Episode 8 In South Sudan, Juba cinema has gone through the tumultuous history of the young country

Inaugurated in 1974, this open-air theater in the Kober district, in the north of Khartoum, screened Sudanese, Chinese, Korean and Egyptian films. During this golden age, the 16 cinemas in the capital could accommodate more than 40,000 spectators per evening. “Even football didn’t attract so many people. Cinema was part of everyday life, mixing social classes. People met here, argued, flirted, talked about business, before and after the session ”, says the former film critic, a glimmer of nostalgia in his eyes.

“The cinema was considered a threat”

At the time of independence in 1956, Sudan was one of the pioneers of cinema in Africa. Avant-garde Gadallah Gubara made the first African color film in 1955, The Song of Khartoum, a prelude to many Sudanese feature films screened in the following years in the sixty cinemas of the unified Sudan, before the industry fell into disrepair.

Already, under the dictatorship of Gaafar Nimeiry (1969-1985), film productions were tightly controlled by the authorities. “The censors were scrupulous, in the name of preserving community sensitivities”, recalls Tallal Afifi. But the worst was to come. After a brief democratic episode, the military-Islamist coup of 1989, which marked the advent of the reign of Omar Al-Bashir and the National Congress Party, has definitely brought down the curtain on the Sudanese film scene.

Episode 1 Ivory Coast: in Abidjan, on the trail of old cinemas

“Like all artistic events, the cinema was considered a threat. Bringing the masses together outside of political meetings was not to the taste of the authorities ”, explains the founder of the Sudan Film Factory. The establishment of a night curfew from 1989 to 1995 signed the death sentence for open-air theaters, which closed one after the other. Distributors and producers ended up completely deserting the country from 1997 when, another coup de grace, American and European economic sanctions were imposed on the Islamist regime for its policy deemed complacent with regard to terrorism.

“Sudan has lived thirty years of isolation”, asserts Suleiman Ibrahim, a 65-year-old filmmaker trained in Moscow in the 1970s. Most of the directors of his generation went into exile. For those who, like him, have stayed, “The pressure of the regime on our shoulders was enormous, we were constantly in the sights of the security services”, he recalls.

For two years, the renewal

Suleiman Ibrahim’s mustache and his facetious demeanor are not unknown to European moviegoers. With three others “Comrades in misfortune”, they tried to rehabilitate the old cinema in the Thawra district, in the north of Khartoum, without ever obtaining the necessary authorizations. Their futile struggle was immortalized in the film Talking about Trees, directed by Suhaib Gasmelbari, who won the award for best documentary at the Berlin film festival in 2019. As a symbol, it is a film about cinema that has revived the machine.

Great paradox of this stammering awakening, Sudanese films applauded by foreign critics are not shown in Sudan

For two years, a renewal has been at work. Some movies like Khartoum Offside by Marwa Zein, or more recently You will die at 20, by Amjad Abu Alala, have toured international festivals, winning numerous awards. ” These films once again put the country in the spotlight, arousing the curiosity of audiences abroad ”, welcomes Tallal Afifi who participated in the production of Amjad Abu Alala’s film.

Tallal Afifi holds old damaged films in his hands, at the Al-Wahda cinema, in Khartoum, Sudan, on July 15, 2021: “It's sad isn't it?  These tapes were happiness and joy for the people.  Today they are reduced to dust.

For a whole generation of young filmmakers who have cut their teeth more or less clandestinely over the past ten years, the popular uprising that began in December 2018 – leading to the fall of the Al-Bashir regime a few months later – opened a new space of freedoms. «

It was a happy coincidence. It was not the actual revolution that encouraged film production. Most of the directors had already started shooting with the means at hand since the Internet boom. But current events have made it possible to take a new look at these films, giving them depth ”, says Tallal Afifi.

Great paradox of this stammering awakening, Sudanese films applauded by foreign critics are not shown in Sudan. For Tallal Afifi, this is one of the major challenges to be taken up. At 43, this passionate dream of arousing a new popular craze for the seventh art. Invited to the “Filmfest” in Munich in 2008, he was inspired by the Iraqi documentary Life after the Fall by Kasim Abid who won the first prize. “I recognized the Sudan there, with its dictatorship, its two rivers, its religions which kill each other. I said to myself that if this director could shoot with a handheld camera and win a prize, we too had our chance », He explains.

Episode 2 In northern Nigeria, the conservative Kannywood cinema

Returning to Khartoum after a brief year of exile in Cairo, he set up the Sudan Film Factory in 2009, with the support of the Goethe Institute. His association, which organizes an independent film festival, has already provided training to more than 300 students in various film professions. This July day, in the premises of the association, located in a villa in a wealthy district of the capital, a hundred people came to attend the screening of two Sudanese films. Sitting in the middle of the garden on rows of plastic chairs, spectators wear the mask. Another hard blow, the Covid-19 epidemic has slowed the pace of projections.

“It’s resourcefulness”

At the end of the screening, Ibrahim Muhammad, one of the directors, performs the show, narrating the film’s background and answering the spectators’ questions. “In Sudan, you have to produce your films on your own. There is no institution capable of financing them. It’s resourcefulness, we train friends in sound recording », says the filmmaker, who started filming six years ago and has now created a small independent production company.

“Interest in Sudanese cinema is growing, but this needs to be translated into investments. We need money to develop local production companies, but especially infrastructure. We are sorely lacking professional studios ”, he concludes.

Due to a lack of resources, this new Sudanese scene makes more of short films or documentaries. International sanctions, about to be lifted, still make it difficult to purchase spare parts or software updates. Some make the trip by plane to Dubai or Saudi Arabia, their hard drives in their pockets.

Episode 5 Thomas Sankara’s cinema continues to make Burkinabés dream

Since the fall of Al-Bashir, Ibrahim Muhammad has become optimistic. “We have lived thirty years of emptiness; thirty years of destruction of art; thirty years of brainwashing. The cinema is now seen as haram, inappropriate, useless. We, the directors, play an important role in unraveling everything that the old regime put in place. We can change the looks ”, he hopes, before adding that the revolution “Is still incomplete”.

This young director had his equipment confiscated while he was covering the peaceful sit-in which was installed in front of the army headquarters in April 2019. He deplores the presence of many generals of the previous regime in the instances of transition. “For months, everyone improvised as a director. Art was everywhere. We have so many hidden stories to reveal, to put into pictures ”, he dreams. For this new generation of lovers of the seventh art, Sudanese cinema has started up again and nothing will be able to stop it.

African cinemas

The World Africa and his correspondents went to meet African cinemas. Those of a lost golden age as in Ivory Coast or Algeria where, a few decades ago, we thronged in the dark rooms to discover the latest action films or rediscover the classics of national creation.

“Cinemas did not survive the switch from analog to digital” of the early 2000s, regrets the Ivorian film critic Yacouba Sangaré. There as elsewhere, the seventh art had to take side roads to continue to reach its audience. Video stores – from VHS tapes to DVDs – have nurtured a generation of moviegoers.

Some today are trying to revive mythical venues and their demanding programming, as in Morocco or Burkina Faso. Others see in the series a new mode of fertile creation. From fans of the Tangier film library to the conservative cinema of Kannywood, in northern Nigeria, they make African cinema today.

Episode 1 Ivory Coast: in Abidjan, on the trail of the cinemas of yesteryear
Episode 2 In northern Nigeria, the conservative Kannywood cinema
Episode 3 Isabelle Kabano, Rwanda on edge
Episode 4 In Cameroon, the purchase of four local films by Netflix gives hope to the cinema sector
Episode 5 Thomas Sankara’s cinema continues to make Burkinabés dream
Episode 6 The Tangier cinematheque wants to restore the taste of the seventh art to Moroccans
Episode 7 In Algeria, the impossible rehabilitation of cinemas
Episode 8 In South Sudan, Juba cinema has gone through the tumultuous history of the young country
Episode 9 In Sudan, cinema in search of a new lease of life after the revolution

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1626972117) } [8]=> array(14) { ["title"]=> string(58) "Tokyo 1964, when the Olympics were a celebration for Japan" ["link"]=> string(86) "https://nysenewsupdates.com/tokyo-1964-when-the-olympics-were-a-celebration-for-japan/" ["comments"]=> string(94) "https://nysenewsupdates.com/tokyo-1964-when-the-olympics-were-a-celebration-for-japan/#respond" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(11) "Susan Hally" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Thu, 22 Jul 2021 15:58:45 +0000" ["category"]=> string(41) "Asia PacificcelebrationJapanOlympicsTokyo" ["guid"]=> string(86) "https://nysenewsupdates.com/tokyo-1964-when-the-olympics-were-a-celebration-for-japan/" ["description"]=> string(76) "View of Tokyo, end of 1963. The cost of the work undertaken for the major..." ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(3899) "

Asked to the Japanese Parliament a few weeks ago on the reason for maintaining the Tokyo 2021 Olympic Games despite the risks associated with the Covid-19 health crisis, Yoshihide Suga launched into a vibrant account of the joy that ‘he had felt a teenager during the 1964 Games. Eluding the question, the Prime Minister played on the image of these Olympics which remain for the Japanese a pivotal moment in their history: their country, defeated and humiliated at the end of the World War II, raised its head and recovered its honor by renewing its “Global simultaneity”, in the words of the philosopher Kojin Karatani.

It was tempting for the leaders of the beginning of the XXIe century of seeking to resuscitate this almost unanimous euphoria to celebrate the « Japan is back » launched in 2013 by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, proclaiming the end of a long period of stagnation in the Archipelago. Tokyo applied for the 2016 Olympics in 2009, but they went to Rio de Janeiro. Mr. Abe returned to the charge a few months after the triple disaster of March 2011 (earthquake, tsunami and nuclear accident at the Fukushima plant). This time it was a question of turning the page on these disasters. Tokyo won the Games but the Covid-19 epidemic was to shatter the ideal scenario imagined to give way to the fear of a new wave of contamination thanks to the event. The magic of the Games no longer worked.

Article reserved for our subscribers Read also The Tokyo Olympics, behind closed doors and under a state of emergency

The Olympic Games, during which internationalism and chauvinism are disputed, were the high mass where for more than a century the special relationship with the West of the first Asian country to be modernized has been played out. A complex relationship, in which conflicting feelings of threat and admiration, inferiority and pride become entangled.

Two editions of the Olympic Games punctuated this path: Berlin in 1936 and Tokyo in 1964. In Berlin, the Japanese felt they had taken a step forward in their quest for equality with the West. The prowess of a country emerging from feudalism – which had risked being dismembered like China and had become in half a century a state which the imperialist powers had to take into account – certainly had something to satisfy the Japanese national pride. But this newcomer lacked one last gesture to be equal to them: the rejection in 1919 of his proposal to include the equality of races in the charter of the League of Nations, which the victors of the Great War (of which Japan was a part) were being drafted, had been felt like a snub.

You have 68.85% of this article to read. The rest is for subscribers only.

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Asked to the Japanese Parliament a few weeks ago on the reason for maintaining the Tokyo 2021 Olympic Games despite the risks associated with the Covid-19 health crisis, Yoshihide Suga launched into a vibrant account of the joy that ‘he had felt a teenager during the 1964 Games. Eluding the question, the Prime Minister played on the image of these Olympics which remain for the Japanese a pivotal moment in their history: their country, defeated and humiliated at the end of the World War II, raised its head and recovered its honor by renewing its “Global simultaneity”, in the words of the philosopher Kojin Karatani.

It was tempting for the leaders of the beginning of the XXIe century of seeking to resuscitate this almost unanimous euphoria to celebrate the « Japan is back » launched in 2013 by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, proclaiming the end of a long period of stagnation in the Archipelago. Tokyo applied for the 2016 Olympics in 2009, but they went to Rio de Janeiro. Mr. Abe returned to the charge a few months after the triple disaster of March 2011 (earthquake, tsunami and nuclear accident at the Fukushima plant). This time it was a question of turning the page on these disasters. Tokyo won the Games but the Covid-19 epidemic was to shatter the ideal scenario imagined to give way to the fear of a new wave of contamination thanks to the event. The magic of the Games no longer worked.

Article reserved for our subscribers Read also The Tokyo Olympics, behind closed doors and under a state of emergency

The Olympic Games, during which internationalism and chauvinism are disputed, were the high mass where for more than a century the special relationship with the West of the first Asian country to be modernized has been played out. A complex relationship, in which conflicting feelings of threat and admiration, inferiority and pride become entangled.

Two editions of the Olympic Games punctuated this path: Berlin in 1936 and Tokyo in 1964. In Berlin, the Japanese felt they had taken a step forward in their quest for equality with the West. The prowess of a country emerging from feudalism – which had risked being dismembered like China and had become in half a century a state which the imperialist powers had to take into account – certainly had something to satisfy the Japanese national pride. But this newcomer lacked one last gesture to be equal to them: the rejection in 1919 of his proposal to include the equality of races in the charter of the League of Nations, which the victors of the Great War (of which Japan was a part) were being drafted, had been felt like a snub.

You have 68.85% of this article to read. The rest is for subscribers only.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1626969525) } [9]=> array(14) { ["title"]=> string(65) "In South Africa, the official toll of the riots rises to 276 dead" ["link"]=> string(93) "https://nysenewsupdates.com/in-south-africa-the-official-toll-of-the-riots-rises-to-276-dead/" ["comments"]=> string(101) "https://nysenewsupdates.com/in-south-africa-the-official-toll-of-the-riots-rises-to-276-dead/#respond" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(11) "Susan Hally" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Thu, 22 Jul 2021 14:38:50 +0000" ["category"]=> string(50) "InternationalAfricadeadofficialriotsrisesSouthtoll" ["guid"]=> string(93) "https://nysenewsupdates.com/in-south-africa-the-official-toll-of-the-riots-rises-to-276-dead/" ["description"]=> string(93) "To stay up to date with African news, subscribe to the “Monde Afrique” newsletter from..." ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(3151) "

To stay up to date with African news, subscribe to the “Monde Afrique” newsletter from this link. Every Saturday at 6 am, find a week of current events and debates treated by the editorial staff of “Monde Afrique”.

After a scene of looting in the Bara shopping center in Soweto, southwest of Johannesburg, July 15, 2021

The riots and looting that bloodied South Africa have left 276 dead, the government announced on Wednesday (July 21), revising upwards a previous death toll of 215.

“Since the unrest broke out, 234 related deaths have been recorded in Kwazulu-Natal [est] nowadays “Presidential Minister Khumbudzo Ntshavheni said in a statement, reporting 42 deaths in Gauteng province, which includes the country’s two main cities, Johannesburg and Pretoria, the capital.

The police opened 168 murder investigations. Some of the deaths are due to jostling, falling objects and building fires.

“Mop-up operations”

The unrest erupted in Kwazulu-Natal on July 9, initially taking the form of riots following the incarceration of former President Jacob Zuma for contempt of justice. They then spread, against a background of endemic unemployment and new restrictions against the Covid-19, reaching Johannesburg, to calm down at the beginning of the week.

Read also In South Africa, violence has affected more than 40,000 businesses

The “Stability” returned to the two affected provinces, assured the minister, specifying that the police were carrying out “Sweeping operations to prevent any opportunistic action”. Six people, including a former public radio presenter, were arrested and prosecuted for inciting violence. Thousands more have been arrested for looting.

Economically, the government estimates that the violence will cost the economy 50 billion rand, or $ 3.4 billion, with the two affected regions accounting for half of the national GDP (gross domestic product).

The World with AFP

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To stay up to date with African news, subscribe to the “Monde Afrique” newsletter from this link. Every Saturday at 6 am, find a week of current events and debates treated by the editorial staff of “Monde Afrique”.

After a scene of looting in the Bara shopping center in Soweto, southwest of Johannesburg, July 15, 2021

The riots and looting that bloodied South Africa have left 276 dead, the government announced on Wednesday (July 21), revising upwards a previous death toll of 215.

“Since the unrest broke out, 234 related deaths have been recorded in Kwazulu-Natal [est] nowadays “Presidential Minister Khumbudzo Ntshavheni said in a statement, reporting 42 deaths in Gauteng province, which includes the country’s two main cities, Johannesburg and Pretoria, the capital.

The police opened 168 murder investigations. Some of the deaths are due to jostling, falling objects and building fires.

“Mop-up operations”

The unrest erupted in Kwazulu-Natal on July 9, initially taking the form of riots following the incarceration of former President Jacob Zuma for contempt of justice. They then spread, against a background of endemic unemployment and new restrictions against the Covid-19, reaching Johannesburg, to calm down at the beginning of the week.

Read also In South Africa, violence has affected more than 40,000 businesses

The “Stability” returned to the two affected provinces, assured the minister, specifying that the police were carrying out “Sweeping operations to prevent any opportunistic action”. Six people, including a former public radio presenter, were arrested and prosecuted for inciting violence. Thousands more have been arrested for looting.

Economically, the government estimates that the violence will cost the economy 50 billion rand, or $ 3.4 billion, with the two affected regions accounting for half of the national GDP (gross domestic product).

The World with AFP

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