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Channel: wikileaksisdemocracy

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      ["title"]=>
      string(72) "‘Twilight’ Director Explains Why Emmett Carried Bag of Eggs in Movie"
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      string(100) "https://wikileaksisdemocracy.org/twilight-director-explains-why-emmett-carried-bag-of-eggs-in-movie/"
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      string(681) "“Twilight” fans recently noticed a strange detail in Catherine Hardwicke’s 2008 movie. In the cafeteria scene that introduced the Cullens, Emmett carried a plastic bag of eggs. Hardwicke told Insider that she saw the actor Kellan Lutz with the eggs and wrote it into the scene. Loading Something is loading. A bag of eggs was ... Read more"
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A bag of eggs was hiding in plain sight in “Twilight,” and many fans only recently noticed the baffling detail. The director Catherine Hardwicke explained what was really going on.

The 2008 movie starred Kristen Stewart as a teen who fell in love with a brooding vampire named Edward Cullen (played by Robert Pattinson).

“Twilight,” based on the first novel in Stephenie Meyer’s fantasy series of the same name, became a worldwide phenomenon, sparking four sequels and propelling the cast to new levels of fame. More than a decade later, people are still praising the film’s iconic baseball scene as a cinematic masterpiece.

All the movies in the saga were filled with hidden details, goofs, and callbacks — but somehow, many fans didn’t realize that “Twilight” included literal Easter eggs, carried by Emmett Cullen (Kellan Lutz).

twilight emmett eggs detail

Emmett Cullen, played by Lutz, carried a bag of eggs in his first scene in “Twilight.”

Summit Entertainment


The sneaky moment happened early in the movie when the Cullen family made their grand, slow-motion entrance in the cafeteria, establishing all six of the vampires’ personalities.

Emmett, the buff and athletic Cullen, was carrying a clear plastic bag with several eggs. The bag was also on the table the Cullens sat at. Bella kept turning back to glance at them, and Edward stared back at her, wondering why he couldn’t read her thoughts.

Emmett never did anything with the eggs, so their inclusion baffled fans.

twilight emmett eggs table detail

Emmett had a bag of eggs in a “Twilight” scene.

Summit Entertainment


Many didn’t even catch the detail until months ago, when people began pointing it out on Twitter, Reddit, and TikTok. Some people aware of the bag of eggs have referred to Emmett as “Eggmett.”

Lutz acknowledged the chatter on Instagram in September when he posted a photo of himself on set holding the bag of eggs.

A post shared by Kellan Lutz (@kellanlutz)

The confusing detail made its way to TikTok in a viral video in April.

When reached for comment, Lutz told Insider via email that he was “taking that secret to the grave.”

Hardwicke, however, told Insider recently that the “super quirky detail” was inspired by Lutz.

“I saw Kellan one day carrying a bag of, like, one dozen hard-boiled eggs,” the director recalled. “I’m like, ‘What in the hell is going on? You’re not going to eat like a dozen eggs, are you?'”

Hardwicke said the actor had likely been eating protein-packed eggs because he was working with a trainer and adjusting his diet for his vampire role.

“I never had seen anybody carrying around a Ziploc bag of one dozen eggs and going to eat them all day long,” the director said.

“I was just laughing so hard,” she continued. “I’m like, ‘OK, [Emmett] has to have those eggs. You have to carry that in that scene,’ because it was just outrageous.”

Hardwicke added: “So that was really it, just a super quirky detail that the real Kellan was doing.”

twilight baseball scene emmett tracksuit

Lutz as Emmett Cullen in “Twilight.”

Summit Entertainment


It also worked in the context of the scene, because vampires don’t eat human food, so the Cullens used various items as props to blend in.

Emmett didn’t eat the hard-boiled eggs, but they didn’t go to waste either.

Hardwicke said that after the scene, Lutz “ate those eggs, because that was his real meal for the day.” She added that she enjoyed any opportunity to “weave in any little bizarre thing” into her projects.

Perhaps the eggs went largely unnoticed because people were too busy focusing on the Cullens’ slow-motion debut or fawning over Edward’s knowing smirk after Bella’s new friend Jessica said he was “totally gorgeous, obviously, but apparently nobody here’s good enough for him.”

Hardwicke said she wasn’t surprised that eagle-eyed fans noticed the most minute details of the hit movie.

“When people see a movie as much as ‘Twilight,’ they do start picking up on all the funny little things you sneak in there,” she said. “So I love it. It’s great.”

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
‘Twilight’ Director Explains Why Emmett Carried Bag of Eggs in Movie

" } ["summary"]=> string(681) "“Twilight” fans recently noticed a strange detail in Catherine Hardwicke’s 2008 movie. In the cafeteria scene that introduced the Cullens, Emmett carried a plastic bag of eggs. Hardwicke told Insider that she saw the actor Kellan Lutz with the eggs and wrote it into the scene. Loading Something is loading. A bag of eggs was ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(11492) "

A bag of eggs was hiding in plain sight in “Twilight,” and many fans only recently noticed the baffling detail. The director Catherine Hardwicke explained what was really going on.

The 2008 movie starred Kristen Stewart as a teen who fell in love with a brooding vampire named Edward Cullen (played by Robert Pattinson).

“Twilight,” based on the first novel in Stephenie Meyer’s fantasy series of the same name, became a worldwide phenomenon, sparking four sequels and propelling the cast to new levels of fame. More than a decade later, people are still praising the film’s iconic baseball scene as a cinematic masterpiece.

All the movies in the saga were filled with hidden details, goofs, and callbacks — but somehow, many fans didn’t realize that “Twilight” included literal Easter eggs, carried by Emmett Cullen (Kellan Lutz).

twilight emmett eggs detail

Emmett Cullen, played by Lutz, carried a bag of eggs in his first scene in “Twilight.”

Summit Entertainment


The sneaky moment happened early in the movie when the Cullen family made their grand, slow-motion entrance in the cafeteria, establishing all six of the vampires’ personalities.

Emmett, the buff and athletic Cullen, was carrying a clear plastic bag with several eggs. The bag was also on the table the Cullens sat at. Bella kept turning back to glance at them, and Edward stared back at her, wondering why he couldn’t read her thoughts.

Emmett never did anything with the eggs, so their inclusion baffled fans.

twilight emmett eggs table detail

Emmett had a bag of eggs in a “Twilight” scene.

Summit Entertainment


Many didn’t even catch the detail until months ago, when people began pointing it out on Twitter, Reddit, and TikTok. Some people aware of the bag of eggs have referred to Emmett as “Eggmett.”

Lutz acknowledged the chatter on Instagram in September when he posted a photo of himself on set holding the bag of eggs.

A post shared by Kellan Lutz (@kellanlutz)

The confusing detail made its way to TikTok in a viral video in April.

When reached for comment, Lutz told Insider via email that he was “taking that secret to the grave.”

Hardwicke, however, told Insider recently that the “super quirky detail” was inspired by Lutz.

“I saw Kellan one day carrying a bag of, like, one dozen hard-boiled eggs,” the director recalled. “I’m like, ‘What in the hell is going on? You’re not going to eat like a dozen eggs, are you?'”

Hardwicke said the actor had likely been eating protein-packed eggs because he was working with a trainer and adjusting his diet for his vampire role.

“I never had seen anybody carrying around a Ziploc bag of one dozen eggs and going to eat them all day long,” the director said.

“I was just laughing so hard,” she continued. “I’m like, ‘OK, [Emmett] has to have those eggs. You have to carry that in that scene,’ because it was just outrageous.”

Hardwicke added: “So that was really it, just a super quirky detail that the real Kellan was doing.”

twilight baseball scene emmett tracksuit

Lutz as Emmett Cullen in “Twilight.”

Summit Entertainment


It also worked in the context of the scene, because vampires don’t eat human food, so the Cullens used various items as props to blend in.

Emmett didn’t eat the hard-boiled eggs, but they didn’t go to waste either.

Hardwicke said that after the scene, Lutz “ate those eggs, because that was his real meal for the day.” She added that she enjoyed any opportunity to “weave in any little bizarre thing” into her projects.

Perhaps the eggs went largely unnoticed because people were too busy focusing on the Cullens’ slow-motion debut or fawning over Edward’s knowing smirk after Bella’s new friend Jessica said he was “totally gorgeous, obviously, but apparently nobody here’s good enough for him.”

Hardwicke said she wasn’t surprised that eagle-eyed fans noticed the most minute details of the hit movie.

“When people see a movie as much as ‘Twilight,’ they do start picking up on all the funny little things you sneak in there,” she said. “So I love it. It’s great.”

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
‘Twilight’ Director Explains Why Emmett Carried Bag of Eggs in Movie

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1634414824) } [1]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(83) "What the classic Spaghetti Westerns really owe to Akira Kurosawa – nonenglishfeed" ["link"]=> string(113) "https://wikileaksisdemocracy.org/what-the-classic-spaghetti-westerns-really-owe-to-akira-kurosawa-nonenglishfeed/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Susan Paul" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Sat, 16 Oct 2021 19:57:13 +0000" ["category"]=> string(62) "TrendingAkiraclassicKurosawanonenglishfeedoweSpaghettiWesterns" ["guid"]=> string(113) "https://wikileaksisdemocracy.org/what-the-classic-spaghetti-westerns-really-owe-to-akira-kurosawa-nonenglishfeed/" ["description"]=> string(743) " “For a Few Dollars More” By Damian Flanagan I was recently rewatching the three spaghetti western classics, “A Fistful of Dollars,” “For a Few Dollars More,” and “The Good, The Bad and The Ugly” — collectively known as “The Dollars Trilogy” — films that have long resonated in my imagination. It’s well ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(10298) "





“For a Few Dollars More”


By Damian Flanagan


I was recently rewatching the three spaghetti western classics, “A Fistful of Dollars,” “For a Few Dollars More,” and “The Good, The Bad and The Ugly” — collectively known as “The Dollars Trilogy” — films that have long resonated in my imagination.


It’s well known that “A Fistful of Dollars” was an unauthorised reworking of Japanese director Akira Kurosawa’s highly regarded 1961 film, “Yojinbo” (“The Bodyguard”). Yet if you think about what director Sergio Leone took most from Kurosawa in the trilogy, then it seems less about just copying the character and plot for his opening film and more about allowing Kurosawa’s conceptual ideas to gradually inspire Leone in uniquely interesting ways.


In “Yojinbo” — a film about a masterless samurai playing off two feuding houses of retainers against each other — Kurosawa was daringly satirising the most important value system of pre-modern Japan: The code of feudal loyalty, the idea that absolute, unquestioning obedience to a feudal lord was the greatest samurai virtue.


Confucian ideals about loyalty underpinned the entire power structure of Edo period (1603-1867) Japan and indeed carried on into the modern age, transferred in the Meiji era (1868-1912) to submission to the nation state, and finally in the post-war era to dedication to the Japanese company.


Yet Kurosawa’s anti-hero, memorably played by Toshiro Mifune, is not a self-sacrificing samurai lifted from the pages of classic plays like “The 47 Loyal Retainers,” but rather a pragmatically self-interested and self-contained man, completely uninterested in “loyalty” and casually flipping his services between rival clans as and when he feels like it.





Akira Kurosawa


In “A Fistful of Dollars” (1964), Sergio Leone stayed mostly faithful to the plot of Kurosawa’s original, simply transposing the action from a Japanese village to a Wild West town and retaining the claustrophobic atmosphere. It’s still a story about an enigmatic loner switching loyalty from one scheming clan to another, but in the Wild West — where vigorous individualism reigned supreme — the trampling of the concept of “loyalty” did not carry the same iconoclastic meaning as it did in Japan.


Yet in subsequent films Leone began to explore how his modern take on the Western could be used to subvert specifically European value systems in the same way that Kurosawa had satirised traditional Japanese value systems.


In “For a Few Dollars More” (1965) — while maintaining the same stylized gunfights, cast of degenerate-looking characters, operatic elements and enigmatic lead character as “A Fistful of Dollars” — we have a narrative line which is informed not by Japan but in reaction to the suffocating Catholic moral order of Leone’s own native Italy.


Two competing bounty hunters (played by Clint Eastwood and Lee Van Cleef) join forces to wipe out an entire band of outlaws. What really strikes you though is the painterly way in which the director Sergio Leone frames the assembly of bandits at a derelict church to resemble the structure of Renaissance religious art works, such as Leonardo da Vinci’s famous portrait of “The Last Supper.”


Indio, the bandit leader and his 12 accomplices, are positioned in the centre of the church like Jesus and his twelve disciples, sub-divided into groups of three. Indio, a pathological killer, is a kind of anti-Jesus who assumes the pulpit to speak to his men about the next daring crime they will commit. Into their midst arrives Eastwood’s bounty hunter character, pretending to be a bandit, though actually a Judas in their midst.


If Kurosawa subverted the prized concept of “loyalty” at the heart of Japan’s moral order, then Leone turned the “moral authority” of Catholic Europe on its head. Judas, the ultimate villain of European civilization, is here turned into Leone’s angelic hero, while “Jesus” and his apostles are recast as villains.


Before the bandits rob the bank at El Paso, they enjoy a “Last Supper” together, breaking bread and gustily drinking wine. “For a Few Dollars More” narrates a systematic hit job on the central icons of Christianity, picking off the bandit apostles one by one, until we are left with only the “anti-Jesus” Indio (played by Gian Maria Volonte), shot through the heart by the Bible-reading Colonel Mortimer (Van Cleef).





Sergio Leone


Can you really get away with wiping out “Jesus” and his whole crew? Won’t you meet your comeuppance and hang from a gibbet like Judas? Entering into the world of “The Good, The Bad and the Ugly,” we discover Blondie (Eastwood) and a new accomplice, Tuco (Eli Wallach) running a scam that involves outlaw Tuco being repeatedly handed over for a reward and brought to the point of being hung for crimes, before having the rope around his neck shot away at the last minute by crack shot Blondie. As if to taunt the immortal Christian legend of remorse and divine retribution, these “Judases” (who soon start betraying each other) keep surviving and tenaciously holding on to life, trying to keep hold of the bounty they share.


If you were to ask, “What is the central message of Catholic Europe, embodied in its timeworn artworks?” then it would be this: Renounce all worldly desires and dreams of gold because the grave gapes for you. The ephemerality of life, the folly of worldly ambition and the need to prepare for the afterlife is the key message which suffuses not just all the religious art of Christendom, but all the secular works, from still lives to portraiture, too.


In Leone’s vision, when at the climax of the film we reach the seemingly infinite metaphysical graveyard, with identical crosses panning out in every direction in which the two “Judases” Blondie and Tuco are encircled, we know we are at the climax. The music soars to new heights of ecstasy as Tuco, mesmerized and uncontainable, feels dizzy with excitement at the thought of claiming the gold that is contained within the key grave.


The entire religiously moral universe has been overthrown and reconfigured as Ennio Morricone’s music — with its paganistic yelps, animalistic beats and choral crescendos — crashes in waves, again and again. In this arena, gold is not being offered up to enter the grave; rather, gold is being dug out of the grave to give luxury and meaning to life itself.


Kurosawa’s genius is widely acknowledged in film circles, but Leone’s lesser appreciation belittles his achievements. Leone took as his starting point two vastly different and alien influences, melded them, reinterpreted them, and then used them as gothic buttresses in a cathedral of ideas that allows him to reimagine the structure and strictures of western religion and how it judges fallible mortal men, pitting them against each other, scrapping over trinkets only to earn holes in their hearts. Leone knows a thing or two about sin, guilt, redemption and the theatre that plays out at the graveside: “The Dollars Trilogy” is his masterful altar piece.


@DamianFlanagan


(This is Part 41 of a series)


In this column, Damian Flanagan, a researcher in Japanese literature, ponders about Japanese culture as he travels back and forth between Japan and Britain.


Profile:


Damian Flanagan is an author and critic born in Britain in 1969. He studied in Tokyo and Kyoto between 1989 and 1990 while a student at Cambridge University. He was engaged in research activities at Kobe University from 1993 through 1999. After taking the master’s and doctoral courses in Japanese literature, he earned a Ph.D. in 2000. He is now based in both Nishinomiya, Hyogo Prefecture, and Manchester. He is the author of “Natsume Soseki: Superstar of World Literature” (Sekai Bungaku no superstar Natsume Soseki).

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
What the classic Spaghetti Westerns really owe to Akira Kurosawa – nonenglishfeed

" } ["summary"]=> string(743) " “For a Few Dollars More” By Damian Flanagan I was recently rewatching the three spaghetti western classics, “A Fistful of Dollars,” “For a Few Dollars More,” and “The Good, The Bad and The Ugly” — collectively known as “The Dollars Trilogy” — films that have long resonated in my imagination. It’s well ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(10298) "





“For a Few Dollars More”


By Damian Flanagan


I was recently rewatching the three spaghetti western classics, “A Fistful of Dollars,” “For a Few Dollars More,” and “The Good, The Bad and The Ugly” — collectively known as “The Dollars Trilogy” — films that have long resonated in my imagination.


It’s well known that “A Fistful of Dollars” was an unauthorised reworking of Japanese director Akira Kurosawa’s highly regarded 1961 film, “Yojinbo” (“The Bodyguard”). Yet if you think about what director Sergio Leone took most from Kurosawa in the trilogy, then it seems less about just copying the character and plot for his opening film and more about allowing Kurosawa’s conceptual ideas to gradually inspire Leone in uniquely interesting ways.


In “Yojinbo” — a film about a masterless samurai playing off two feuding houses of retainers against each other — Kurosawa was daringly satirising the most important value system of pre-modern Japan: The code of feudal loyalty, the idea that absolute, unquestioning obedience to a feudal lord was the greatest samurai virtue.


Confucian ideals about loyalty underpinned the entire power structure of Edo period (1603-1867) Japan and indeed carried on into the modern age, transferred in the Meiji era (1868-1912) to submission to the nation state, and finally in the post-war era to dedication to the Japanese company.


Yet Kurosawa’s anti-hero, memorably played by Toshiro Mifune, is not a self-sacrificing samurai lifted from the pages of classic plays like “The 47 Loyal Retainers,” but rather a pragmatically self-interested and self-contained man, completely uninterested in “loyalty” and casually flipping his services between rival clans as and when he feels like it.





Akira Kurosawa


In “A Fistful of Dollars” (1964), Sergio Leone stayed mostly faithful to the plot of Kurosawa’s original, simply transposing the action from a Japanese village to a Wild West town and retaining the claustrophobic atmosphere. It’s still a story about an enigmatic loner switching loyalty from one scheming clan to another, but in the Wild West — where vigorous individualism reigned supreme — the trampling of the concept of “loyalty” did not carry the same iconoclastic meaning as it did in Japan.


Yet in subsequent films Leone began to explore how his modern take on the Western could be used to subvert specifically European value systems in the same way that Kurosawa had satirised traditional Japanese value systems.


In “For a Few Dollars More” (1965) — while maintaining the same stylized gunfights, cast of degenerate-looking characters, operatic elements and enigmatic lead character as “A Fistful of Dollars” — we have a narrative line which is informed not by Japan but in reaction to the suffocating Catholic moral order of Leone’s own native Italy.


Two competing bounty hunters (played by Clint Eastwood and Lee Van Cleef) join forces to wipe out an entire band of outlaws. What really strikes you though is the painterly way in which the director Sergio Leone frames the assembly of bandits at a derelict church to resemble the structure of Renaissance religious art works, such as Leonardo da Vinci’s famous portrait of “The Last Supper.”


Indio, the bandit leader and his 12 accomplices, are positioned in the centre of the church like Jesus and his twelve disciples, sub-divided into groups of three. Indio, a pathological killer, is a kind of anti-Jesus who assumes the pulpit to speak to his men about the next daring crime they will commit. Into their midst arrives Eastwood’s bounty hunter character, pretending to be a bandit, though actually a Judas in their midst.


If Kurosawa subverted the prized concept of “loyalty” at the heart of Japan’s moral order, then Leone turned the “moral authority” of Catholic Europe on its head. Judas, the ultimate villain of European civilization, is here turned into Leone’s angelic hero, while “Jesus” and his apostles are recast as villains.


Before the bandits rob the bank at El Paso, they enjoy a “Last Supper” together, breaking bread and gustily drinking wine. “For a Few Dollars More” narrates a systematic hit job on the central icons of Christianity, picking off the bandit apostles one by one, until we are left with only the “anti-Jesus” Indio (played by Gian Maria Volonte), shot through the heart by the Bible-reading Colonel Mortimer (Van Cleef).





Sergio Leone


Can you really get away with wiping out “Jesus” and his whole crew? Won’t you meet your comeuppance and hang from a gibbet like Judas? Entering into the world of “The Good, The Bad and the Ugly,” we discover Blondie (Eastwood) and a new accomplice, Tuco (Eli Wallach) running a scam that involves outlaw Tuco being repeatedly handed over for a reward and brought to the point of being hung for crimes, before having the rope around his neck shot away at the last minute by crack shot Blondie. As if to taunt the immortal Christian legend of remorse and divine retribution, these “Judases” (who soon start betraying each other) keep surviving and tenaciously holding on to life, trying to keep hold of the bounty they share.


If you were to ask, “What is the central message of Catholic Europe, embodied in its timeworn artworks?” then it would be this: Renounce all worldly desires and dreams of gold because the grave gapes for you. The ephemerality of life, the folly of worldly ambition and the need to prepare for the afterlife is the key message which suffuses not just all the religious art of Christendom, but all the secular works, from still lives to portraiture, too.


In Leone’s vision, when at the climax of the film we reach the seemingly infinite metaphysical graveyard, with identical crosses panning out in every direction in which the two “Judases” Blondie and Tuco are encircled, we know we are at the climax. The music soars to new heights of ecstasy as Tuco, mesmerized and uncontainable, feels dizzy with excitement at the thought of claiming the gold that is contained within the key grave.


The entire religiously moral universe has been overthrown and reconfigured as Ennio Morricone’s music — with its paganistic yelps, animalistic beats and choral crescendos — crashes in waves, again and again. In this arena, gold is not being offered up to enter the grave; rather, gold is being dug out of the grave to give luxury and meaning to life itself.


Kurosawa’s genius is widely acknowledged in film circles, but Leone’s lesser appreciation belittles his achievements. Leone took as his starting point two vastly different and alien influences, melded them, reinterpreted them, and then used them as gothic buttresses in a cathedral of ideas that allows him to reimagine the structure and strictures of western religion and how it judges fallible mortal men, pitting them against each other, scrapping over trinkets only to earn holes in their hearts. Leone knows a thing or two about sin, guilt, redemption and the theatre that plays out at the graveside: “The Dollars Trilogy” is his masterful altar piece.


@DamianFlanagan


(This is Part 41 of a series)


In this column, Damian Flanagan, a researcher in Japanese literature, ponders about Japanese culture as he travels back and forth between Japan and Britain.


Profile:


Damian Flanagan is an author and critic born in Britain in 1969. He studied in Tokyo and Kyoto between 1989 and 1990 while a student at Cambridge University. He was engaged in research activities at Kobe University from 1993 through 1999. After taking the master’s and doctoral courses in Japanese literature, he earned a Ph.D. in 2000. He is now based in both Nishinomiya, Hyogo Prefecture, and Manchester. He is the author of “Natsume Soseki: Superstar of World Literature” (Sekai Bungaku no superstar Natsume Soseki).

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
What the classic Spaghetti Westerns really owe to Akira Kurosawa – nonenglishfeed

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1634414233) } [2]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(65) "Doctor Who Flux: Series 13 release date, episodes and next Doctor" ["link"]=> string(97) "https://wikileaksisdemocracy.org/doctor-who-flux-series-13-release-date-episodes-and-next-doctor/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Susan Paul" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Sat, 16 Oct 2021 19:56:03 +0000" ["category"]=> string(43) "TrendingdateDoctorepisodesFluxreleaseseries" ["guid"]=> string(97) "https://wikileaksisdemocracy.org/doctor-who-flux-series-13-release-date-episodes-and-next-doctor/" ["description"]=> string(637) "The series will be titled Flux (Picture: BBC Studios/Zoe McConnell) It’s been confirmed that Jodie Whittaker’s time as The Doctor will end in 2022 with a trio of specials, culminating in an ‘epic blockbuster’ that will air next autumn. Showrunner Chris Chibnall’s time on Doctor Who will also come to an end, five years on ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(10895) "
The series will be titled Flux (Picture: BBC Studios/Zoe McConnell)

It’s been confirmed that Jodie Whittaker’s time as The Doctor will end in 2022 with a trio of specials, culminating in an ‘epic blockbuster’ that will air next autumn.

Showrunner Chris Chibnall’s time on Doctor Who will also come to an end, five years on from his selecting Whittaker to be the first female Doctor in 2017.

Speculation is already swirling over who will replace her in the Tardis, with Olly Alexander, Michaela Coel and Richard Ayoade ranked among the favourites.

Before that tearful goodbye, we still have lots more adventures to look forward to in series 13, as a new trailer offered an exciting glimpse into the highly anticipated season.

But when can fans expect to see the beginning of the end for Jodie Whittaker’s Doctor?

When is series 13 coming out?

Jodie Whittaker in Doctor Who stood in a misty wood.

The Doctor will be back just in time for Halloween (Credits: BBC Studios/James Pardon)

The next series of Doctor Who – the third to star Whittaker as the Doctor and the 13th since the show’s 2005 reboot – will begin on BBC One from October 31.

The news of the release was accompanied by an official title – Flux – with the series set to tell one overarching story.

How many episodes will there be in Flux?

There’ll be six episodes in series 13, forming part of a single narrative.

‘It’s definitely the most ambitious thing we’ve done,’ showrunner Chris Chibnall recently revealed. ‘It’s epic and ambitious and we do go to a lot of places.’

Jodie Whittaker with Mandip Gill and John Bishop

Whittaker, pictured with Gill and Bishop, made her Doctor Who debut in 2017 (Picture: BBC)

Comedian John Bishop will make his Doctor Who debut in the series as a man called Dan, while Mandip Gill will return as the Doctor’s companion Yaz.

The latest trailer also confirmed that Inbetweeners star Blake Harrison and Line Of Duty’s Craig Parkinson will also be part of the cast.

Who could be the next Doctor Who?

Russel T Davies and Olly Alexander.

Olly Alexander recently starred in Russel T Davies acclaimed drama It’s A Sin (Picture: Getty)

There has already been a great deal of speculation over who might take over the famous role, with Davies’ It’s A Sin star Olly Alexander the current favourite.

‘Olly Alexander has been a very popular selection in our next Doctor Who market’ said Coral’s John Hill.

‘Other names which are prominent in the betting include Kris Marshall, Michaela Coel and Michael Sheen,’ added Hill.

Whittaker’s departure also opens the door for a non-white actor to be cast as the Doctor for the very first time.

Paterson Joseph auditioned for the role when David Tennant stepped down, only for it to go to Matt Smith instead.

‘I pretty much knew that I hadn’t got it, and weirdly wasn’t disappointed,’ he told The Independent in 2014.

It has been rumoured that Chiwetel Ejiofor was offered the role around the same time.

Moffat revealed in 2016 that a black actor (who he did not name) was offered the part ‘but for various reasons, it didn’t work out.’

How long has Jodie Whittaker been The Doctor?

To view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web
browser that
supports HTML5
video

Whittaker became the 13th Doctor when she took over the Tardis from Peter Capaldi in 2017.

Since then she has been seen in two full series as well as two New Year’s Day specials.

‘In 2017 I opened my glorious gift box of size 13 shoes,’ said the 39-year-old. ‘I could not have guessed the brilliant adventures, worlds and wonders I was to see in them.

‘My heart is so full of love for this show, for the team who make it, for the fans who watch it and for what it has brought to my life.’

Why are Jodie Whittaker and Chris Chibnall leaving Doctor Who?

Chris Chibnall

Chris Chibnall previously worked with Whittaker on Broadchurch (Picture: BBC/Getty)

According to Chris Chibnall, he and Whittaker made a ‘three series and out’ pact when they first took over the show from previous showrunner Steven Moffat.

The announcement they are moving on follows months of speculation about their future on the show.

Russell T Davies – who rebooted the show back in 2005 – is coming back to take over as showrunner in 2023 following Whittaker and Chibnall’s final episodes.

MORE : Doctor Who: Jodie Whittaker already filmed regeneration scene ahead of 14th Doctor announcement

MORE : Doctor Who theory teases terrifying series 13 plot as fans convinced epic character return is in store

MORE : David Tennant teases ‘possible’ Doctor Who comeback following return of Russell T Davies: ‘Never say never to anything’

Follow Metro across our social channels, on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Share your views in the comments below.

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
Doctor Who Flux: Series 13 release date, episodes and next Doctor

" } ["summary"]=> string(637) "The series will be titled Flux (Picture: BBC Studios/Zoe McConnell) It’s been confirmed that Jodie Whittaker’s time as The Doctor will end in 2022 with a trio of specials, culminating in an ‘epic blockbuster’ that will air next autumn. Showrunner Chris Chibnall’s time on Doctor Who will also come to an end, five years on ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(10895) "
The series will be titled Flux (Picture: BBC Studios/Zoe McConnell)

It’s been confirmed that Jodie Whittaker’s time as The Doctor will end in 2022 with a trio of specials, culminating in an ‘epic blockbuster’ that will air next autumn.

Showrunner Chris Chibnall’s time on Doctor Who will also come to an end, five years on from his selecting Whittaker to be the first female Doctor in 2017.

Speculation is already swirling over who will replace her in the Tardis, with Olly Alexander, Michaela Coel and Richard Ayoade ranked among the favourites.

Before that tearful goodbye, we still have lots more adventures to look forward to in series 13, as a new trailer offered an exciting glimpse into the highly anticipated season.

But when can fans expect to see the beginning of the end for Jodie Whittaker’s Doctor?

When is series 13 coming out?

Jodie Whittaker in Doctor Who stood in a misty wood.

The Doctor will be back just in time for Halloween (Credits: BBC Studios/James Pardon)

The next series of Doctor Who – the third to star Whittaker as the Doctor and the 13th since the show’s 2005 reboot – will begin on BBC One from October 31.

The news of the release was accompanied by an official title – Flux – with the series set to tell one overarching story.

How many episodes will there be in Flux?

There’ll be six episodes in series 13, forming part of a single narrative.

‘It’s definitely the most ambitious thing we’ve done,’ showrunner Chris Chibnall recently revealed. ‘It’s epic and ambitious and we do go to a lot of places.’

Jodie Whittaker with Mandip Gill and John Bishop

Whittaker, pictured with Gill and Bishop, made her Doctor Who debut in 2017 (Picture: BBC)

Comedian John Bishop will make his Doctor Who debut in the series as a man called Dan, while Mandip Gill will return as the Doctor’s companion Yaz.

The latest trailer also confirmed that Inbetweeners star Blake Harrison and Line Of Duty’s Craig Parkinson will also be part of the cast.

Who could be the next Doctor Who?

Russel T Davies and Olly Alexander.

Olly Alexander recently starred in Russel T Davies acclaimed drama It’s A Sin (Picture: Getty)

There has already been a great deal of speculation over who might take over the famous role, with Davies’ It’s A Sin star Olly Alexander the current favourite.

‘Olly Alexander has been a very popular selection in our next Doctor Who market’ said Coral’s John Hill.

‘Other names which are prominent in the betting include Kris Marshall, Michaela Coel and Michael Sheen,’ added Hill.

Whittaker’s departure also opens the door for a non-white actor to be cast as the Doctor for the very first time.

Paterson Joseph auditioned for the role when David Tennant stepped down, only for it to go to Matt Smith instead.

‘I pretty much knew that I hadn’t got it, and weirdly wasn’t disappointed,’ he told The Independent in 2014.

It has been rumoured that Chiwetel Ejiofor was offered the role around the same time.

Moffat revealed in 2016 that a black actor (who he did not name) was offered the part ‘but for various reasons, it didn’t work out.’

How long has Jodie Whittaker been The Doctor?

To view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web
browser that
supports HTML5
video

Whittaker became the 13th Doctor when she took over the Tardis from Peter Capaldi in 2017.

Since then she has been seen in two full series as well as two New Year’s Day specials.

‘In 2017 I opened my glorious gift box of size 13 shoes,’ said the 39-year-old. ‘I could not have guessed the brilliant adventures, worlds and wonders I was to see in them.

‘My heart is so full of love for this show, for the team who make it, for the fans who watch it and for what it has brought to my life.’

Why are Jodie Whittaker and Chris Chibnall leaving Doctor Who?

Chris Chibnall

Chris Chibnall previously worked with Whittaker on Broadchurch (Picture: BBC/Getty)

According to Chris Chibnall, he and Whittaker made a ‘three series and out’ pact when they first took over the show from previous showrunner Steven Moffat.

The announcement they are moving on follows months of speculation about their future on the show.

Russell T Davies – who rebooted the show back in 2005 – is coming back to take over as showrunner in 2023 following Whittaker and Chibnall’s final episodes.

MORE : Doctor Who: Jodie Whittaker already filmed regeneration scene ahead of 14th Doctor announcement

MORE : Doctor Who theory teases terrifying series 13 plot as fans convinced epic character return is in store

MORE : David Tennant teases ‘possible’ Doctor Who comeback following return of Russell T Davies: ‘Never say never to anything’

Follow Metro across our social channels, on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Share your views in the comments below.

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
Doctor Who Flux: Series 13 release date, episodes and next Doctor

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1634414163) } [3]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(80) "This Is the Watch George Clooney Wears When He Wants to Feel Like George Clooney" ["link"]=> string(114) "https://wikileaksisdemocracy.org/this-is-the-watch-george-clooney-wears-when-he-wants-to-feel-like-george-clooney/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Susan Paul" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Sat, 16 Oct 2021 19:54:58 +0000" ["category"]=> string(35) "TrendingClooneyfeelGeorgeWatchwears" ["guid"]=> string(114) "https://wikileaksisdemocracy.org/this-is-the-watch-george-clooney-wears-when-he-wants-to-feel-like-george-clooney/" ["description"]=> string(714) "Welcome to Watches of the Week, where we’ll track the rarest, wildest, and most covetable watches spotted on celebrities. George Clooney’s Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra has it pretty good. While stainless steel watches like this one usted to be relegated to the casual section of the collection—destined for lunch outings and errand runs—for Clooney, as ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(18566) "

Welcome to Watches of the Week, where we’ll track the rarest, wildest, and most covetable watches spotted on celebrities.

George Clooney’s Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra has it pretty good. While stainless steel watches like this one usted to be relegated to the casual section of the collection—destined for lunch outings and errand runs—for Clooney, as for so many other men, it’s a do-it-all powerhouse. Amal’s husband spent all week wearing his Seamaster for every occasion. Here it is at the premiere of the new movie he directed, The Tender Bar. There it is again while “Clooney, 60, looks dapper in grey suit” after a “romantic dinner” in New York City, as documented by The Daily Mail. You think steel watches like Clooney’s Seamaster got to “look dapper” and go to “romantic dinners” several decades ago? That was territory reserved for leather-banded watches made out of gold, my friends. Now, Clooney can get away with wearing his watch all the time. It was in its element again this week when he paired it with a polo and jeans for an afternoon stroll. Also this week: Kanye doesn’t know the cost of anything he’s wearing—except his watch.

David M. Benett

George Clooney’s Seamaster Aqua Terra

As an Omega ambassador, Clooney is paid to wear the brand’s watches. But I’d argue that his deal only makes this sequence of events even more noteworthy. Clooney can get his hands on practically any watch from Omega—he could switch them out mid-dinner date, if he wanted. Instead, he’s clearly landed on this particular piece as the watch he wants to wear all the time.

Kanye West’s Royal Oak Concept Flying Tourbillon GMT

Kanye West was on TikTok this week with Chris Smoove, who is known for asking strangers how much their outfits cost. (I’d say this is a surprising place for Kanye to pop up but at this point nothing involving the rapper counts as a surprise.) Smoove went from head-to-toe asking Kanye about the cost of his clothes.

How much the hat? How much the glasses, Ye? How much the hoodie? How much the bag?

Every time, Kanye answered in monotone: “I don’t know.”

Finally, Smoove asked about his watch. Kanye paused to think for a moment before telling Smoove, “$200,[000].” Even for the Royal Oak Concept line, where Audemars typically pushes the boundaries, this watch—with a skeleton dial, GMT complication, and tourbillon—is pretty advanced stuff. Kanye doesn’t have to think about dropping thousands on a Balenciaga bag, but it’s hard to wipe spending 200 grand on a watch like this from your memory.

RB/Bauer-Griffin

Kumail Nanjiani’s Patek Philippe Aquanaut

Kumail Nanjiani now has an action-star body and is fronting the next massive Marvel movie, The Eternals. Fittingly, he got a watch to go with this new identity. The Aquanaut is Patek’s sports watch, capable of going along for the ride when the world needs saving from dragon-like monsters. Or, more likely, the type of watch action stars love to wear on the red carpet.

Offset’s Audemars Piguet Royal Oak

Offset is wearing a brand-new version of the beloved AP Royal Oak that dropped over the summer. As we noted in our initial write-up of these watches, they are technically made for women—a technicality that shouldn’t scare anyone off. Migos member Offset is ready to do away with the ancient idea that watches should come with gender labels, especially when they’re as gorgeous as this lilac Royal Oak. The watch’s bezel is set with 32 amethysts, and AP describes the dial as a “chameleon,” able to shift from purple to pink depending on the light. Together, Cardi B and Offset are building a great genderless collection.

Stephen Gosling

Bradley Beal’s Rolex Sky-Dweller

The Sky-Dweller is solidifying its status as the watch of choice for NBA superstars, whether they’re ascendant talents or full-fledged Hall of Famers. In just the past year, the watch has popped up on the wrists of Michael Jordan, Giannis Antetokounmpo, and LaMelo Ball. Beal, who is entering a critical season with his Washington Wizards, is channeling the right mindset with the Sky-Dweller.

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
This Is the Watch George Clooney Wears When He Wants to Feel Like George Clooney

" } ["summary"]=> string(714) "Welcome to Watches of the Week, where we’ll track the rarest, wildest, and most covetable watches spotted on celebrities. George Clooney’s Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra has it pretty good. While stainless steel watches like this one usted to be relegated to the casual section of the collection—destined for lunch outings and errand runs—for Clooney, as ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(18566) "

Welcome to Watches of the Week, where we’ll track the rarest, wildest, and most covetable watches spotted on celebrities.

George Clooney’s Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra has it pretty good. While stainless steel watches like this one usted to be relegated to the casual section of the collection—destined for lunch outings and errand runs—for Clooney, as for so many other men, it’s a do-it-all powerhouse. Amal’s husband spent all week wearing his Seamaster for every occasion. Here it is at the premiere of the new movie he directed, The Tender Bar. There it is again while “Clooney, 60, looks dapper in grey suit” after a “romantic dinner” in New York City, as documented by The Daily Mail. You think steel watches like Clooney’s Seamaster got to “look dapper” and go to “romantic dinners” several decades ago? That was territory reserved for leather-banded watches made out of gold, my friends. Now, Clooney can get away with wearing his watch all the time. It was in its element again this week when he paired it with a polo and jeans for an afternoon stroll. Also this week: Kanye doesn’t know the cost of anything he’s wearing—except his watch.

David M. Benett

George Clooney’s Seamaster Aqua Terra

As an Omega ambassador, Clooney is paid to wear the brand’s watches. But I’d argue that his deal only makes this sequence of events even more noteworthy. Clooney can get his hands on practically any watch from Omega—he could switch them out mid-dinner date, if he wanted. Instead, he’s clearly landed on this particular piece as the watch he wants to wear all the time.

Kanye West’s Royal Oak Concept Flying Tourbillon GMT

Kanye West was on TikTok this week with Chris Smoove, who is known for asking strangers how much their outfits cost. (I’d say this is a surprising place for Kanye to pop up but at this point nothing involving the rapper counts as a surprise.) Smoove went from head-to-toe asking Kanye about the cost of his clothes.

How much the hat? How much the glasses, Ye? How much the hoodie? How much the bag?

Every time, Kanye answered in monotone: “I don’t know.”

Finally, Smoove asked about his watch. Kanye paused to think for a moment before telling Smoove, “$200,[000].” Even for the Royal Oak Concept line, where Audemars typically pushes the boundaries, this watch—with a skeleton dial, GMT complication, and tourbillon—is pretty advanced stuff. Kanye doesn’t have to think about dropping thousands on a Balenciaga bag, but it’s hard to wipe spending 200 grand on a watch like this from your memory.

RB/Bauer-Griffin

Kumail Nanjiani’s Patek Philippe Aquanaut

Kumail Nanjiani now has an action-star body and is fronting the next massive Marvel movie, The Eternals. Fittingly, he got a watch to go with this new identity. The Aquanaut is Patek’s sports watch, capable of going along for the ride when the world needs saving from dragon-like monsters. Or, more likely, the type of watch action stars love to wear on the red carpet.

Offset’s Audemars Piguet Royal Oak

Offset is wearing a brand-new version of the beloved AP Royal Oak that dropped over the summer. As we noted in our initial write-up of these watches, they are technically made for women—a technicality that shouldn’t scare anyone off. Migos member Offset is ready to do away with the ancient idea that watches should come with gender labels, especially when they’re as gorgeous as this lilac Royal Oak. The watch’s bezel is set with 32 amethysts, and AP describes the dial as a “chameleon,” able to shift from purple to pink depending on the light. Together, Cardi B and Offset are building a great genderless collection.

Stephen Gosling

Bradley Beal’s Rolex Sky-Dweller

The Sky-Dweller is solidifying its status as the watch of choice for NBA superstars, whether they’re ascendant talents or full-fledged Hall of Famers. In just the past year, the watch has popped up on the wrists of Michael Jordan, Giannis Antetokounmpo, and LaMelo Ball. Beal, who is entering a critical season with his Washington Wizards, is channeling the right mindset with the Sky-Dweller.

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
This Is the Watch George Clooney Wears When He Wants to Feel Like George Clooney

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1634414098) } [4]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(52) "Loki’s Nexus Ties Venom To Spider-Man: No Way Home" ["link"]=> string(82) "https://wikileaksisdemocracy.org/lokis-nexus-ties-venom-to-spider-man-no-way-home/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Susan Paul" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Sat, 16 Oct 2021 19:52:42 +0000" ["category"]=> string(42) "Movie NewshomeLokisNexusSpiderManTiesVenom" ["guid"]=> string(82) "https://wikileaksisdemocracy.org/lokis-nexus-ties-venom-to-spider-man-no-way-home/" ["description"]=> string(655) "Venom: Let There Be Carnage’s post-credits transported Venom through the Multiverse – and Loki’s nexus events could help to explain what’s happened. WARNING: This article contains SPOILERS for Venom: Let There Be Carnage! The post-credits scene for Venom: Let There Be Carnage transported the tongue-slavering symbiote into the MCU and set up a potential role ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(15413) "

Venom: Let There Be Carnage’s post-credits transported Venom through the Multiverse – and Loki’s nexus events could help to explain what’s happened.

WARNING: This article contains SPOILERS for Venom: Let There Be Carnage!

The post-credits scene for Venom: Let There Be Carnage transported the tongue-slavering symbiote into the MCU and set up a potential role in Spider-Man: No Way Home – and it could be through the “Nexus” events introduced in Loki. There’s long been intense interest in the idea of Tom Hardy’s Venom and Tom Holland’s Spider-Man coming head-to-head. Now, finally, those hopes and dreams look set to become a reality.

Marvel movies have long been renowned for their post-credits scenes, but Venom: Let There Be Carnage‘s is one of the best yet in that it leaves so many questions unanswered. Eddie Brock finds himself unwittingly transported through the Multiverse, arriving to watch a news broadcast in which J. Jonah Jameson ranted about Spider-Man’s secret identity during Venom: Let There Be Carnage‘s post-credits scene. It’s safe to assume this ties in directly to Spider-Man: No Way Home, which promises to transport a number of Spider-Man villains into the MCU as a result of a magic spell gone wrong. There have long been reports of a hidden sixth enemy, and it looks as though Venom is set to fit the bill.


Related: Venom 2: Every Easter Egg & Marvel Reference Explained

But exactly how has Venom jumped from one dimension to another in the first place? In truth, Marvel is still making up their minds about how their Multiverse works. They determined the rules only after producing a number of films and TV shows based upon it. However, the basic principles may already have actually been explained in Loki.

Loki’s Nexus Events Are More Complicated Than Viewers Think

Loki Episode 6 Multiverse

It’s long been clear that the concept of “nexus” events and beings is key to the MCU’s Phase 4 slate. According to Loki, a nexus event is a moment where a single act can create an entirely different branching timeline in the multiverse. Nexus events can be created by major actions or minor ones – by someone starting a civil war that wasn’t part of the main timeline, or simply being late for work. The Time Variance Authority attempted to prevent the multiverse by pruning all these branches, but they ultimately failed, and now anything is possible in multiversal terms. But the multiverse introduced in Loki is actually more complicated than most viewers realize. Loki director Kate Herron pointed to one shot of the multiverse as it sprang into being, and noted the various branches intersect in quite dramatic ways (as per Murphy’s Multiverse):

“So, there’s the branches, right, which is like the alternative reality. But then something, you’ll see it, it’s very subtle but in the very last shot where you see the Multiverse, there’s like basically other bigger physical timelines branches. So, it’s almost like these different separate trees that are now connecting… It’s almost like a bridge. If you imagine the branch, it is like another reality. But if the branch extends beyond a certain point, it will then connect to other physical timelines… That last shot we did, there are other like thicker [branches] that are meant to be like our timeline. And there are other timelines like that and the branches are the connectors basically.”

Herron seems to be suggesting there are actually two types of intersections between different branches in the MCU multiverse; one where the branches are created, or ones where they connect to one another. In the most dramatic cases, this could potentially lead to a collision of entire realities – the kind of thing seen in the comics in the build-up to Jonathan Hickman’s Secret Wars event, where all the various universes collided. In less spectacular cases, though, a connection between the two branches could be brief, unobserved by most, but it would potentially allow people to inadvertently travel from their home branch to a reality very unlike the world they grew up in. The latter type of nexus sounds exactly like what Venom experiences in Venom: Let There Be Carnage‘s post-credits scene, where Eddie Brock suddenly finds himself transported into a very different bedroom.

Related: Why Venom Needs To Eat Chocolate Or Brains

Doctor Strange’s Spell Could Have Created A Nexus Around Peter Parker

Doctor strange 2 Wandavision nexus commercial

This may explain what has gone wrong with Doctor Strange’s spell in Spider-Man: No Way Home. As confirmed by the trailer, Spider-Man seeks Doctor Strange’s help in the hopes the future Sorcerer Supreme can make the world forget his secret identity. Although Doctor Strange claims his spell is simply one to erase memories, it must be much more far-reaching than that; after all, not only does Strange need to make people forget, he also needs to remove all records of Spider-Man’s secret identity. This explains why Doctor Strange’s spell is affecting the fabric of reality itself, and why – when Peter Parker disrupts it – it backfires badly.

But how exactly does the spell work? It is possible Doctor Strange has inadvertently drawn multiple branching timelines into contact with the MCU, creating a dimensional intersect that is centered around Spider-Man – explaining why so many of the characters jumping realities are associated with different versions of Spider-Man. Even Venom seems to have a loose connection to the wall-crawler, with dialogue in Venom 2‘s post-credits scene suggesting the symbiote hive mind transcends the Multiverse, meaning Eddie Brock’s symbiote could well have retained animosity towards Peter Parker from the symbiote encountered in Spider-Man 3. This would explain why various characters from other Marvel/Spider-Man movie universes have been transported into the MCU.

Marvel Studios has a reputation for long-term planning, but when it comes to the Multiverse they seem to be figuring things out as they go along; in July this year, Marvel Studios president Kevin Feige revealed they’d only recently held a meeting deciding the Multiverse’s rules,  even though several films and TV shows focused around the concept were already in, or approaching, post-production. This may well mean Spider-Man: No Way Home avoids any explicit explanation of exactly how Doctor Strange’s spell has backfired, simply settling for confirming it has done so and leaving it to viewers to figure out how; but if that is the case, Venom: Let There Be Carnage‘s post-credits scene suggests the nexus events introduced in Loki would explain it nicely.

More: Every MCU Movie Releasing After Venom 2

  • Eternals (2021)Release date: Nov 05, 2021
  • Spider-Man: No Way Home (2021)Release date: Dec 17, 2021
  • Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness (2022)Release date: Mar 25, 2022
  • Thor: Love and Thunder (2022)Release date: May 06, 2022
  • Black Panther: Wakanda Forever/Black Panther 2 (2022)Release date: Jul 08, 2022
  • The Marvels/Captain Marvel 2 (2022)Release date: Nov 11, 2022
  • Ant-Man and the Wasp: Quantumania (2023)Release date: Feb 17, 2023
  • Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3 (2023)Release date: May 05, 2023
  • Morbius (2022)Release date: Jan 21, 2022
  • Kraven the Hunter (2023)Release date: Jan 13, 2023

Avengers: Endgame Co-Director Comments On Reported MCU Return


About The Author

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
Loki’s Nexus Ties Venom To Spider-Man: No Way Home

" } ["summary"]=> string(655) "Venom: Let There Be Carnage’s post-credits transported Venom through the Multiverse – and Loki’s nexus events could help to explain what’s happened. WARNING: This article contains SPOILERS for Venom: Let There Be Carnage! The post-credits scene for Venom: Let There Be Carnage transported the tongue-slavering symbiote into the MCU and set up a potential role ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(15413) "

Venom: Let There Be Carnage’s post-credits transported Venom through the Multiverse – and Loki’s nexus events could help to explain what’s happened.

WARNING: This article contains SPOILERS for Venom: Let There Be Carnage!

The post-credits scene for Venom: Let There Be Carnage transported the tongue-slavering symbiote into the MCU and set up a potential role in Spider-Man: No Way Home – and it could be through the “Nexus” events introduced in Loki. There’s long been intense interest in the idea of Tom Hardy’s Venom and Tom Holland’s Spider-Man coming head-to-head. Now, finally, those hopes and dreams look set to become a reality.

Marvel movies have long been renowned for their post-credits scenes, but Venom: Let There Be Carnage‘s is one of the best yet in that it leaves so many questions unanswered. Eddie Brock finds himself unwittingly transported through the Multiverse, arriving to watch a news broadcast in which J. Jonah Jameson ranted about Spider-Man’s secret identity during Venom: Let There Be Carnage‘s post-credits scene. It’s safe to assume this ties in directly to Spider-Man: No Way Home, which promises to transport a number of Spider-Man villains into the MCU as a result of a magic spell gone wrong. There have long been reports of a hidden sixth enemy, and it looks as though Venom is set to fit the bill.


Related: Venom 2: Every Easter Egg & Marvel Reference Explained

But exactly how has Venom jumped from one dimension to another in the first place? In truth, Marvel is still making up their minds about how their Multiverse works. They determined the rules only after producing a number of films and TV shows based upon it. However, the basic principles may already have actually been explained in Loki.

Loki’s Nexus Events Are More Complicated Than Viewers Think

Loki Episode 6 Multiverse

It’s long been clear that the concept of “nexus” events and beings is key to the MCU’s Phase 4 slate. According to Loki, a nexus event is a moment where a single act can create an entirely different branching timeline in the multiverse. Nexus events can be created by major actions or minor ones – by someone starting a civil war that wasn’t part of the main timeline, or simply being late for work. The Time Variance Authority attempted to prevent the multiverse by pruning all these branches, but they ultimately failed, and now anything is possible in multiversal terms. But the multiverse introduced in Loki is actually more complicated than most viewers realize. Loki director Kate Herron pointed to one shot of the multiverse as it sprang into being, and noted the various branches intersect in quite dramatic ways (as per Murphy’s Multiverse):

“So, there’s the branches, right, which is like the alternative reality. But then something, you’ll see it, it’s very subtle but in the very last shot where you see the Multiverse, there’s like basically other bigger physical timelines branches. So, it’s almost like these different separate trees that are now connecting… It’s almost like a bridge. If you imagine the branch, it is like another reality. But if the branch extends beyond a certain point, it will then connect to other physical timelines… That last shot we did, there are other like thicker [branches] that are meant to be like our timeline. And there are other timelines like that and the branches are the connectors basically.”

Herron seems to be suggesting there are actually two types of intersections between different branches in the MCU multiverse; one where the branches are created, or ones where they connect to one another. In the most dramatic cases, this could potentially lead to a collision of entire realities – the kind of thing seen in the comics in the build-up to Jonathan Hickman’s Secret Wars event, where all the various universes collided. In less spectacular cases, though, a connection between the two branches could be brief, unobserved by most, but it would potentially allow people to inadvertently travel from their home branch to a reality very unlike the world they grew up in. The latter type of nexus sounds exactly like what Venom experiences in Venom: Let There Be Carnage‘s post-credits scene, where Eddie Brock suddenly finds himself transported into a very different bedroom.

Related: Why Venom Needs To Eat Chocolate Or Brains

Doctor Strange’s Spell Could Have Created A Nexus Around Peter Parker

Doctor strange 2 Wandavision nexus commercial

This may explain what has gone wrong with Doctor Strange’s spell in Spider-Man: No Way Home. As confirmed by the trailer, Spider-Man seeks Doctor Strange’s help in the hopes the future Sorcerer Supreme can make the world forget his secret identity. Although Doctor Strange claims his spell is simply one to erase memories, it must be much more far-reaching than that; after all, not only does Strange need to make people forget, he also needs to remove all records of Spider-Man’s secret identity. This explains why Doctor Strange’s spell is affecting the fabric of reality itself, and why – when Peter Parker disrupts it – it backfires badly.

But how exactly does the spell work? It is possible Doctor Strange has inadvertently drawn multiple branching timelines into contact with the MCU, creating a dimensional intersect that is centered around Spider-Man – explaining why so many of the characters jumping realities are associated with different versions of Spider-Man. Even Venom seems to have a loose connection to the wall-crawler, with dialogue in Venom 2‘s post-credits scene suggesting the symbiote hive mind transcends the Multiverse, meaning Eddie Brock’s symbiote could well have retained animosity towards Peter Parker from the symbiote encountered in Spider-Man 3. This would explain why various characters from other Marvel/Spider-Man movie universes have been transported into the MCU.

Marvel Studios has a reputation for long-term planning, but when it comes to the Multiverse they seem to be figuring things out as they go along; in July this year, Marvel Studios president Kevin Feige revealed they’d only recently held a meeting deciding the Multiverse’s rules,  even though several films and TV shows focused around the concept were already in, or approaching, post-production. This may well mean Spider-Man: No Way Home avoids any explicit explanation of exactly how Doctor Strange’s spell has backfired, simply settling for confirming it has done so and leaving it to viewers to figure out how; but if that is the case, Venom: Let There Be Carnage‘s post-credits scene suggests the nexus events introduced in Loki would explain it nicely.

More: Every MCU Movie Releasing After Venom 2

  • Eternals (2021)Release date: Nov 05, 2021
  • Spider-Man: No Way Home (2021)Release date: Dec 17, 2021
  • Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness (2022)Release date: Mar 25, 2022
  • Thor: Love and Thunder (2022)Release date: May 06, 2022
  • Black Panther: Wakanda Forever/Black Panther 2 (2022)Release date: Jul 08, 2022
  • The Marvels/Captain Marvel 2 (2022)Release date: Nov 11, 2022
  • Ant-Man and the Wasp: Quantumania (2023)Release date: Feb 17, 2023
  • Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3 (2023)Release date: May 05, 2023
  • Morbius (2022)Release date: Jan 21, 2022
  • Kraven the Hunter (2023)Release date: Jan 13, 2023

Avengers: Endgame Co-Director Comments On Reported MCU Return


About The Author

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
Loki’s Nexus Ties Venom To Spider-Man: No Way Home

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1634413962) } [5]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(51) "From Ear For Eye to Crimson Peak, the best TV films" ["link"]=> string(84) "https://wikileaksisdemocracy.org/from-ear-for-eye-to-crimson-peak-the-best-tv-films/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Susan Paul" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Sat, 16 Oct 2021 19:51:38 +0000" ["category"]=> string(48) "Movie Production CompaniesCrimsoneareyeFilmsPeak" ["guid"]=> string(84) "https://wikileaksisdemocracy.org/from-ear-for-eye-to-crimson-peak-the-best-tv-films/" ["description"]=> string(579) "Ear For Eye, BBC Two, 10.15pm Airing on the same day it has its world premiere at the London Film Festival, this searing, innovative, free-wheeling work by Black British playwright and director Debbie Tucker Green is adapted from her own play, a hit when it was staged at London’s Royal Court Theatre in 2018. Her ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(10089) "

Ear For Eye, BBC Two, 10.15pm

Airing on the same day it has its world premiere at the London Film Festival, this searing, innovative, free-wheeling work by Black British playwright and director Debbie Tucker Green is adapted from her own play, a hit when it was staged at London’s Royal Court Theatre in 2018.

Her subject is racism and Black identity on both sides of the Atlantic, and it’s in America that the film opens, with a mother and her son having ‘the talk’ – the one where a different set of ‘facts’ about life are set out. These relate to how young Black men navigate a world where any sign of aggression or non-compliance is punished, sometimes lethally.

There’s a different take on the same subject when the action switches to London, and two young Black women relate their experience of a Black Lives Matter protest march and of confrontation with British police officers. Cut again to America, and it’s a father and son discussing the difference between progress and change, the father stoical, the son impatient. “Change don’t give a f***. Change goin’ do its thing with or without you,” is one of the sharpest lines. Back in the UK, a British man recounts the stress and indignity of being stopped by police and strip-searched. And that’s just part one. Parts two shows an argument between a young Black woman and her pompous White college professor. In Part Three, filmed in black and white, a series of White non-actors read from the laws which once pertained to slaves in American and the Caribbean, and to segregated communities in the American South. Some are as recent as 1956.

Tucker Green’s approach is not that of a conventional writer of film dialogue, however. Actors talk over each other, and the sense of what the scene is telling us comes slowly, through the accretion of certain repeated words and phrases. It’s like listening to music and only gradually picking out melodies and motifs. The set, too, is minimal, essentially a round theatre stage. Those actors not actively participating sometimes sit quietly at the side, bearing witness. Projections are used and the action is intercut with still images.

The cast includes Tosin Cole, Carmen Munroe, Danny Sapani, Jade Anouka and Lashana Lynch, currently starring in new James Bond outing No Time To Die (that’s not the only Bond connection: Eon Productions head Barbara Broccoli, daughter of legendary Bond producer Cubby Broccoli, is an executive producer here). Notable among Tucker Green’s other helpmates are Scottish musician Luke Sutherland, who has created the soundtrack, and Italian-Colombian cinematographer Luciana Riso.

Ear For Eye’s kinetic energy stalls at points, but the collective verve of its creator and her collaborators carries it through. It’s not an easy watch: it is a powerful and thought-provoking one.

Monday

The Assassination Bureau, Talking Pictures TV, 9pm

The peerless Diana Rigg heads a rather unconventional cast for this vintage 1968 action comedy, set before the First World War and based on an unfinished novel by Jack London. Rigg plays tenacious and imperious would-be journalist Sonya Winter, who resolves to lift the lid on the Assassination Bureau, a shadowy organisation that has been at work for centuries, and whose targets are selected based on moral issues. Over time, the rot has started to set in, prompting Sonia to issue a request for the Organisation to assassinate its own leader, the smooth and sophisticated Ivan Dragomiloff. However, much to the journalist’s surprise, he accepts the commission, but is there more to this charismatic chap than meets the eye? The eye-popping cast also includes Oliver Reed, Telly Savalas, Curt Jurgens, Warren Mitchell and Beryl Reid.

Tuesday

Mary, Queen Of Scots, Film4, 4.20pm

Lavish historical biopic charting the turbulent – if relatively short – life of the doomed monarch. The drama focuses on the Catholic Queen’s tempestuous love life, and also sheds light on her struggle to get along with prickly English ruler Elizabeth I, to whom she represented a terrible threat. However, Mary’s ambitions came a cropper when a plot to usurp Elizabeth was revealed, one that would see her imprisoned for years – before being led to the scaffold. The film looks a bit dated compared to lavish, modern versions of the story, but what makes it so compelling are the outstanding – and very different – performances from leading ladies Vanessa Redgrave as Mary and Glenda Jackson as Elizabeth. Timothy Dalton, Patrick McGoohan, Nigel Davenport and Ian Holm head the impressive supporting cast.

Wednesday

Ghost Stories, BBC Two, 11.15pm

Jeremy Dyson and Andy Nyman write and direct this impressive big-screen version of their 2010 stage play that offers some genuine spooks and chills. Nyman heads the cast as Professor Philip Goodman, who has gained a reputation as a debunker of psychics and hoax ghost sightings. He has been given a file of three unsolvable cases by his hero and role model Charles Cameron, who has been missing for years. As Goodman goes to work trying to solve what Cameron could not, his perception of what is real and what is his imagination becomes increasingly blurred, until he is brought down to earth with a bump. Martin Freeman and Paul Whitehouse are among the supporting cast, while psychological illusionist Derren Brown, who regularly collaborates with Nyman on his mind-bending stage shows, is among the vocal cast.

Thursday

Zero Dark Thirty, ITV4, 11.05pm

Director Kathryn Bigelow’s taut drama won five Oscars, including Best Picture, and it’s easy to see why. Based on a true story, it tells the enthralling tale of the 10-year hunt for terrorist leader Osama bin Laden, as seen through the eyes of CIA operative Maya. She joins the team of intelligence and military operatives charged with finding him after the September 11 attacks, dedicating a large chunk of her life to seeking out new information that ultimately leads the authorities to his hideout. Jessica Chastain – who delivers one of her customary outstanding performances as Maya – is ably supported by Mark Strong, Jason Clarke, Kyle Chandler and Joel Edgerton. Look out too for James Gandolfini, Chris Pratt and even John Barrowman among the cast.

Friday

A Time To Kill, BBC One, 11.25pm

Two white racists in the Deep South brutally rape a 10-year-old black girl, prompting enraged father Samuel L Jackson to kill them. As the ensuing court case is thrust into the public eye by the media, ethical lawyer Matthew McConaughey and idealistic student Sandra Bullock have their lives threatened when the Ku Klux Klan set up shop in the area. Moving, powerful and totally enthralling, the combination of action, tragedy and courtroom drama combines for an explosive mix, made all the more riveting by a superb cast putting in some of their best-ever performances. Both Woody Harrelson and Kevin Costner were considered for the lead role, but it eventually went to the largely unknown McConaughey, who became a major star as a result. Donald Sutherland, Kiefer Sutherland and Patrick McGoohan co-star.

And one to stream …

Crimson Peak, Amazon Prime

Oscar-winning Mexican director Guillermo del Toro is best known for steam-punky history-horror-fantasy mash-ups such as Cronos, The Devil’s Backbone, Pan’s Labyrinth and The Shape Of Water. This 2015 chiller doesn’t stray much from those tried-and-tested ingredients.

The setting, initially anyway, is Buffalo, New York. The time, the late 1880s – the so-called Belle Epoque era. Mia Wasikowska (pictured below) is Edith Cushing, heiress to a property fortune built up by her no-nonsense father Carter Cushing (Jim Beaver), though she has her eyes set on a career as a novelist. In an opening scene set at some point in the future and narrated by her, we see her on some blasted English moorland, hands apparently bloodied – and we hear how, 14 years earlier, she lost her mother to cholera and was visited on the night of the funeral by a ghost with an ominous warning: ‘Beware Crimson Peak.’

How Edith goes from a rich, comfortable life in America to a massive, crumbling stately home in Cumberland is down to Sir Thomas Sharpe (Tom Hiddleston) and his scarlet-clad, cool-as-ice sister Lucille (Jessica Chastain, struggling a bit with the English accent but otherwise on top form). Sir Thomas sweeps in to try to coax some money out of Carter to revive the family’s brick-making business and sweeps Edith off her feet. Before you can say ‘Don’t trust a hair on his head’ she and Thomas are married and settled (if that’s the word) at Allerdale Hall. Or Crimson Peak, as it’s known by the locals.

The script leaves a lot to be desired, but Del Toro’s vision and image-making, and the slow building sense of dread he imparts to the work gives the film its oomph. Save it for Hallowe’en, perhaps.

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
From Ear For Eye to Crimson Peak, the best TV films

" } ["summary"]=> string(579) "Ear For Eye, BBC Two, 10.15pm Airing on the same day it has its world premiere at the London Film Festival, this searing, innovative, free-wheeling work by Black British playwright and director Debbie Tucker Green is adapted from her own play, a hit when it was staged at London’s Royal Court Theatre in 2018. Her ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(10089) "

Ear For Eye, BBC Two, 10.15pm

Airing on the same day it has its world premiere at the London Film Festival, this searing, innovative, free-wheeling work by Black British playwright and director Debbie Tucker Green is adapted from her own play, a hit when it was staged at London’s Royal Court Theatre in 2018.

Her subject is racism and Black identity on both sides of the Atlantic, and it’s in America that the film opens, with a mother and her son having ‘the talk’ – the one where a different set of ‘facts’ about life are set out. These relate to how young Black men navigate a world where any sign of aggression or non-compliance is punished, sometimes lethally.

There’s a different take on the same subject when the action switches to London, and two young Black women relate their experience of a Black Lives Matter protest march and of confrontation with British police officers. Cut again to America, and it’s a father and son discussing the difference between progress and change, the father stoical, the son impatient. “Change don’t give a f***. Change goin’ do its thing with or without you,” is one of the sharpest lines. Back in the UK, a British man recounts the stress and indignity of being stopped by police and strip-searched. And that’s just part one. Parts two shows an argument between a young Black woman and her pompous White college professor. In Part Three, filmed in black and white, a series of White non-actors read from the laws which once pertained to slaves in American and the Caribbean, and to segregated communities in the American South. Some are as recent as 1956.

Tucker Green’s approach is not that of a conventional writer of film dialogue, however. Actors talk over each other, and the sense of what the scene is telling us comes slowly, through the accretion of certain repeated words and phrases. It’s like listening to music and only gradually picking out melodies and motifs. The set, too, is minimal, essentially a round theatre stage. Those actors not actively participating sometimes sit quietly at the side, bearing witness. Projections are used and the action is intercut with still images.

The cast includes Tosin Cole, Carmen Munroe, Danny Sapani, Jade Anouka and Lashana Lynch, currently starring in new James Bond outing No Time To Die (that’s not the only Bond connection: Eon Productions head Barbara Broccoli, daughter of legendary Bond producer Cubby Broccoli, is an executive producer here). Notable among Tucker Green’s other helpmates are Scottish musician Luke Sutherland, who has created the soundtrack, and Italian-Colombian cinematographer Luciana Riso.

Ear For Eye’s kinetic energy stalls at points, but the collective verve of its creator and her collaborators carries it through. It’s not an easy watch: it is a powerful and thought-provoking one.

Monday

The Assassination Bureau, Talking Pictures TV, 9pm

The peerless Diana Rigg heads a rather unconventional cast for this vintage 1968 action comedy, set before the First World War and based on an unfinished novel by Jack London. Rigg plays tenacious and imperious would-be journalist Sonya Winter, who resolves to lift the lid on the Assassination Bureau, a shadowy organisation that has been at work for centuries, and whose targets are selected based on moral issues. Over time, the rot has started to set in, prompting Sonia to issue a request for the Organisation to assassinate its own leader, the smooth and sophisticated Ivan Dragomiloff. However, much to the journalist’s surprise, he accepts the commission, but is there more to this charismatic chap than meets the eye? The eye-popping cast also includes Oliver Reed, Telly Savalas, Curt Jurgens, Warren Mitchell and Beryl Reid.

Tuesday

Mary, Queen Of Scots, Film4, 4.20pm

Lavish historical biopic charting the turbulent – if relatively short – life of the doomed monarch. The drama focuses on the Catholic Queen’s tempestuous love life, and also sheds light on her struggle to get along with prickly English ruler Elizabeth I, to whom she represented a terrible threat. However, Mary’s ambitions came a cropper when a plot to usurp Elizabeth was revealed, one that would see her imprisoned for years – before being led to the scaffold. The film looks a bit dated compared to lavish, modern versions of the story, but what makes it so compelling are the outstanding – and very different – performances from leading ladies Vanessa Redgrave as Mary and Glenda Jackson as Elizabeth. Timothy Dalton, Patrick McGoohan, Nigel Davenport and Ian Holm head the impressive supporting cast.

Wednesday

Ghost Stories, BBC Two, 11.15pm

Jeremy Dyson and Andy Nyman write and direct this impressive big-screen version of their 2010 stage play that offers some genuine spooks and chills. Nyman heads the cast as Professor Philip Goodman, who has gained a reputation as a debunker of psychics and hoax ghost sightings. He has been given a file of three unsolvable cases by his hero and role model Charles Cameron, who has been missing for years. As Goodman goes to work trying to solve what Cameron could not, his perception of what is real and what is his imagination becomes increasingly blurred, until he is brought down to earth with a bump. Martin Freeman and Paul Whitehouse are among the supporting cast, while psychological illusionist Derren Brown, who regularly collaborates with Nyman on his mind-bending stage shows, is among the vocal cast.

Thursday

Zero Dark Thirty, ITV4, 11.05pm

Director Kathryn Bigelow’s taut drama won five Oscars, including Best Picture, and it’s easy to see why. Based on a true story, it tells the enthralling tale of the 10-year hunt for terrorist leader Osama bin Laden, as seen through the eyes of CIA operative Maya. She joins the team of intelligence and military operatives charged with finding him after the September 11 attacks, dedicating a large chunk of her life to seeking out new information that ultimately leads the authorities to his hideout. Jessica Chastain – who delivers one of her customary outstanding performances as Maya – is ably supported by Mark Strong, Jason Clarke, Kyle Chandler and Joel Edgerton. Look out too for James Gandolfini, Chris Pratt and even John Barrowman among the cast.

Friday

A Time To Kill, BBC One, 11.25pm

Two white racists in the Deep South brutally rape a 10-year-old black girl, prompting enraged father Samuel L Jackson to kill them. As the ensuing court case is thrust into the public eye by the media, ethical lawyer Matthew McConaughey and idealistic student Sandra Bullock have their lives threatened when the Ku Klux Klan set up shop in the area. Moving, powerful and totally enthralling, the combination of action, tragedy and courtroom drama combines for an explosive mix, made all the more riveting by a superb cast putting in some of their best-ever performances. Both Woody Harrelson and Kevin Costner were considered for the lead role, but it eventually went to the largely unknown McConaughey, who became a major star as a result. Donald Sutherland, Kiefer Sutherland and Patrick McGoohan co-star.

And one to stream …

Crimson Peak, Amazon Prime

Oscar-winning Mexican director Guillermo del Toro is best known for steam-punky history-horror-fantasy mash-ups such as Cronos, The Devil’s Backbone, Pan’s Labyrinth and The Shape Of Water. This 2015 chiller doesn’t stray much from those tried-and-tested ingredients.

The setting, initially anyway, is Buffalo, New York. The time, the late 1880s – the so-called Belle Epoque era. Mia Wasikowska (pictured below) is Edith Cushing, heiress to a property fortune built up by her no-nonsense father Carter Cushing (Jim Beaver), though she has her eyes set on a career as a novelist. In an opening scene set at some point in the future and narrated by her, we see her on some blasted English moorland, hands apparently bloodied – and we hear how, 14 years earlier, she lost her mother to cholera and was visited on the night of the funeral by a ghost with an ominous warning: ‘Beware Crimson Peak.’

How Edith goes from a rich, comfortable life in America to a massive, crumbling stately home in Cumberland is down to Sir Thomas Sharpe (Tom Hiddleston) and his scarlet-clad, cool-as-ice sister Lucille (Jessica Chastain, struggling a bit with the English accent but otherwise on top form). Sir Thomas sweeps in to try to coax some money out of Carter to revive the family’s brick-making business and sweeps Edith off her feet. Before you can say ‘Don’t trust a hair on his head’ she and Thomas are married and settled (if that’s the word) at Allerdale Hall. Or Crimson Peak, as it’s known by the locals.

The script leaves a lot to be desired, but Del Toro’s vision and image-making, and the slow building sense of dread he imparts to the work gives the film its oomph. Save it for Hallowe’en, perhaps.

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
From Ear For Eye to Crimson Peak, the best TV films

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1634413898) } [6]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(133) "‘Star Trek: Picard’: Patrick Stewart: “I knew my father as a weak and alcoholic man. Then I discovered his other side ”| TV" ["link"]=> string(147) "https://wikileaksisdemocracy.org/star-trek-picard-patrick-stewart-i-knew-my-father-as-a-weak-and-alcoholic-man-then-i-discovered-his-other-side-tv/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Susan Paul" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Sat, 16 Oct 2021 19:47:39 +0000" ["category"]=> string(94) "Movie Production CompaniesalcoholicdiscoveredFatherKnewManPatrickPicardsidestarStewartTrekWeak" ["guid"]=> string(147) "https://wikileaksisdemocracy.org/star-trek-picard-patrick-stewart-i-knew-my-father-as-a-weak-and-alcoholic-man-then-i-discovered-his-other-side-tv/" ["description"]=> string(844) "To access the interview with Captain Jean-Luc Picard (Sir Patrick Stewart), the most famous commander of Star Trek, with the permission of his predecessor Kirk, there is as much control as on the command bridge of the USS Enterprise. Don’t sneak in or make a Vulcan face. The appointment to talk about the new ten-episode ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(11956) "

To access the interview with Captain Jean-Luc Picard (Sir Patrick Stewart), the most famous commander of Star Trek, with the permission of his predecessor Kirk, there is as much control as on the command bridge of the USS Enterprise. Don’t sneak in or make a Vulcan face. The appointment to talk about the new ten-episode series Star Trek: Picard (Amazon Prime Video), an expansion of the popular sci-fi franchise that begins airing on Friday, January 24, is in a very upscale London hotel with corridors so long that it takes a teleporter to get through them. The omnipresent organization of the meeting includes a lot of girls with the starfleet pin and two muscular guys with Klingon air who look at you with suspicion, do not go to be a trekkie infiltrate. The door to room 126 opens with great punctuality and they give me the green light. Here we go, beam me up, Scotty, and that Mr. Spock distribute luck. Stewart, the legendary protagonist of the television series Star Trek: The Next Generation (seven seasons, 1987-1994, released 21 years after the original) and his four films, he is seated at a table and radiates the same authority as if we were to activate the push for curvature to enter a very distant corner of the universe . He wears a spotless white (collared) shirt and wears glasses. Next to him is, and it is a surprise because it was not announced, none other than the actress Jeri Ryan, Seven of Nine in the galaxy, a reinserted borg (dangerous race of cybernetic humanoids) that appeared in the series Star Trek: Voyager (1995-2001, seven seasons) and that comes out in the new one. It is a satisfaction to contemplate that Ryan does not have artificial implants today, nor is it that the former Miss Illinois needs them …

More information

“Peace and prosperity”, I begin, as it seems obliged. Stewart and Ryan make an amused face at the Vulcan salute and gesture and smile back. It is surprising to note that Captain Picard cannot open his fingers as is canonical. They both laugh. “I have never been able,” deplores the actor, with his formidable deep voice. What are the differences between the new Picard and the old one, which we left 18 years ago in the movie Star Trek: Nemesis (2002)? “Huge. To accept starring in the new series I made a condition not to do the same again, the same situations in the Enterprise, wearing the uniform … No, it had to be something else entirely. So they came up with that new story which is great. It immediately made me think of the interest in reviewing Picard’s television story. The plot evolves to show a man who is angry, lonely, and even in some way desperate. And isolated. At the beginning he is living with two Romulans, who take care of him, two excellent people, who will return in the second season. It is about exploring how that man who was reasonable, calm, cunning, friendly, warm, has been able to become very different. It is a challenge that I have greatly enjoyed. In a first script, I yelled at the workers of my vineyards in French, in French, an abusive French. I love how that can baffle the public. “

The series, in which a very special mysterious young woman, Dahj (Isa Briones) related to the sacrificed android Data, goes to ask the protagonist for help in his retirement, starts with Picard, of French origin (La Barre, 2305), on leave Starfleet, caring for the family’s vineyards and bottling the Chateau Picard. Stewart (Mirfield, Yorkshire, 1940) is more of Earl Gray’s tea, right? The actor laughs heartily and Jery Ryan laughs too. The actress takes the opportunity to say that she loves Stewart’s work in the new series. “I’ve only seen the first three episodes but I think it’s magnificent, it makes me cry,” he says. “It’s so moving, so emotional, so competent.”

There are some surprising references to Dunkirk in the first episode, referring to the past tragedy of the exodus of millions of Romulan refugees, following the destruction of their empire’s homeworld, in whose rescue Starfleet failed despite Picard’s attempts, somewhat that haunts you. “Yes”. Stewart’s father was on the Dunkirk retreat. “Not exactly, he was part of the British expeditionary force in France in 1939, he escaped on the last ship in Cheburg, just as the German Army Panzers were closing the bag.” There are echoes of Dunkirk, the collective rescue effort, in the Romulian tragedy that has traumatized Picard and also the current drama of the refugees. “Yes, in the interview that she gives to the television in episode 1 and how bad it goes, the interviewer says that the effort that the fleet made was like building the pyramids of Egypt, and Picard ditch: ‘No, no, no, the pyramids were an act of inordinate pride, the most accurate historical image is that of Dunkirk. ‘ The poor interviewer, of course, has no idea what Dunkirk was … “.

Stewart’s father had a very negative impact on his son, drunk and abusive, he was a kind of Darth Vader. The actor is not bothered by the personal twist of the interview and even laughs a bit at the mention of the villain of Star Wars. “Yes, he finished his army service in 1945 as a superstar, he was the highest ranking NCO in his regiment. When I participated in a BBC program on family roots, a man, who had been a sergeant with him, said to me: ‘Do you know what your father did?’, No, he never told me, I replied, ‘well, he fought in Montecasino ‘, that hell. He was then taken to London and charged with reorganizing the Parachute Regiment, which had been decimated in Arnheim, with so many dead and so many prisoners, morale was down and his job was to reestablish it. ‘I think your father was an extraordinary man,’ that sergeant told me. That moved me very deeply, because I knew him as a weak and alcoholic, violent and angry man. So as soon as I found out, and because my mother had suffered so much and I had become a member of Refuge, the UK’s leading domestic violence association, I did research and found out that there was another organization, Combat Stress, to help war veterans, and I joined her. This one for my father, the other for my mother ”.

Patrick Stewart at the premiere for ‘Star Trek: Picard’ in Los Angeles.Getty

Stewart has been visibly moved by the recall, which with his Shakespearean range of voice is absolutely moving and exceptional, and Ryan has put his hand on his arm tenderly. “Anyway, my father had had a very bad press for me for years, I’m afraid.” Picard, by the way, has a very Shakespearean side, the logical thing given that who embodies him is a renowned member of the Royal Shakespeare Company who has played numerous roles as the playwright, including notable Othello, Prospero, Macbeth and Claudio, Hamlet’s stepfather. (and he has said that Shakespeare’s characters prepared him to sit in the captain’s chair of the Enterprise and face galactic dilemmas). Is Picard even more Shakespearean in the new series? “I guess we could say. His life is close to tragedy. I have a theory about classic actors and science fiction. One of the reasons why you find so many actors with that kind of training … ”, like his great friend Ian Mckellen (Gandalf, Magneto), with whom they share the X-Men films (Stewart as the mutant preceptor Charles Xavier, Professor X), apart from having done together Vladimir and Estragon in Esperando to Godot; “Yes Yes; I said it is because there are certain similarities, not only because there are no pockets in the spacesuits as well as in the Shakespearean leotards, it is the scope of the stories, great stories about recognizable people. “

How do captains prefer Picard or Ahab, whom you played in the miniseries? Moby Dick (1998)? “Oh, Ahab is crazy. He is an unstable and dangerous man. I loved doing it. Even more so because there was Gregory Peck, John Huston’s Ahab playing the role of Father Marple, the one Orson Welles played in that version ”. Interestingly, Picard quotes Moby Dick on the bridge of the Enterprise… He has also played Captain Nemo, what a trio of captains! “Right, I did. In Thailand. A television version of The mysterious Island. My Nemo was really cool, and well, honestly, I enjoyed being in Thailand all that time. ” Stewart takes the opportunity to remember that he also appeared, as Gurney Halleck (the Atreides’ weapons master), in “that strange David Lynch sci-fi movie, what was it called?” Dune, “exactly”. What Stewart did not do … he was even the fearsome Praetorian leader Sejanus in I, Claudio, and King Leodegrance, father of Guinevere, in Excalibur by John Boorman!

In the new series, Picard is more of a passenger than a captain – Santiago Cabrera’s role as a space smuggler of the Han Solo race. “Yes”. What is better in a spaceship, being a captain or a passenger? “There is a moment when Picard walks past the captain’s chair and realizes that it is not his, and that he has to take a seat as a passenger … I love being a captain, every part of it; and in that I have to go back to talking about my father, the capacity for leadership and inspiring others ”.

In the plot, in relation to the prohibition of creating artificial beings, there seem to be echoes of Blade Runner. “Hmm, I can’t say, I’m not sure I recognize that.” Fans of Star Trek They would not forgive me for not asking you if a new model of Enterprise. “No, you can see a model hanging in the lobby of Starfleet headquarters, but I think it’s Model D, I’m never really sure about that.” Stewart and Ryan laugh in unison.

Does the actor like Picard practice fencing? “Fencing? I studied for a year. I had two options, fencing or judo. And I wasn’t interested in judo at all, so I chose fencing and I really enjoyed it ”. Saber? “No, it was my master’s weapon, but I used foil, and sword.” Not Jedi lightsaber? “Hahaha no”. Time’s up, Stewart has the detail of printing an autograph on the cover of the book Star Trek, Picard: the classic Chronicles (Titan, 2019), a celebration of the character and the series. With the specimen under one’s arm one can go out into the street and, full of enthusiasm track, see how the world expands towards the limits of known space and beyond, to the last frontier.

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
‘Star Trek: Picard’: Patrick Stewart: “I knew my father as a weak and alcoholic man. Then I discovered his other side ”| TV

" } ["summary"]=> string(844) "To access the interview with Captain Jean-Luc Picard (Sir Patrick Stewart), the most famous commander of Star Trek, with the permission of his predecessor Kirk, there is as much control as on the command bridge of the USS Enterprise. Don’t sneak in or make a Vulcan face. The appointment to talk about the new ten-episode ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(11956) "

To access the interview with Captain Jean-Luc Picard (Sir Patrick Stewart), the most famous commander of Star Trek, with the permission of his predecessor Kirk, there is as much control as on the command bridge of the USS Enterprise. Don’t sneak in or make a Vulcan face. The appointment to talk about the new ten-episode series Star Trek: Picard (Amazon Prime Video), an expansion of the popular sci-fi franchise that begins airing on Friday, January 24, is in a very upscale London hotel with corridors so long that it takes a teleporter to get through them. The omnipresent organization of the meeting includes a lot of girls with the starfleet pin and two muscular guys with Klingon air who look at you with suspicion, do not go to be a trekkie infiltrate. The door to room 126 opens with great punctuality and they give me the green light. Here we go, beam me up, Scotty, and that Mr. Spock distribute luck. Stewart, the legendary protagonist of the television series Star Trek: The Next Generation (seven seasons, 1987-1994, released 21 years after the original) and his four films, he is seated at a table and radiates the same authority as if we were to activate the push for curvature to enter a very distant corner of the universe . He wears a spotless white (collared) shirt and wears glasses. Next to him is, and it is a surprise because it was not announced, none other than the actress Jeri Ryan, Seven of Nine in the galaxy, a reinserted borg (dangerous race of cybernetic humanoids) that appeared in the series Star Trek: Voyager (1995-2001, seven seasons) and that comes out in the new one. It is a satisfaction to contemplate that Ryan does not have artificial implants today, nor is it that the former Miss Illinois needs them …

More information

“Peace and prosperity”, I begin, as it seems obliged. Stewart and Ryan make an amused face at the Vulcan salute and gesture and smile back. It is surprising to note that Captain Picard cannot open his fingers as is canonical. They both laugh. “I have never been able,” deplores the actor, with his formidable deep voice. What are the differences between the new Picard and the old one, which we left 18 years ago in the movie Star Trek: Nemesis (2002)? “Huge. To accept starring in the new series I made a condition not to do the same again, the same situations in the Enterprise, wearing the uniform … No, it had to be something else entirely. So they came up with that new story which is great. It immediately made me think of the interest in reviewing Picard’s television story. The plot evolves to show a man who is angry, lonely, and even in some way desperate. And isolated. At the beginning he is living with two Romulans, who take care of him, two excellent people, who will return in the second season. It is about exploring how that man who was reasonable, calm, cunning, friendly, warm, has been able to become very different. It is a challenge that I have greatly enjoyed. In a first script, I yelled at the workers of my vineyards in French, in French, an abusive French. I love how that can baffle the public. “

The series, in which a very special mysterious young woman, Dahj (Isa Briones) related to the sacrificed android Data, goes to ask the protagonist for help in his retirement, starts with Picard, of French origin (La Barre, 2305), on leave Starfleet, caring for the family’s vineyards and bottling the Chateau Picard. Stewart (Mirfield, Yorkshire, 1940) is more of Earl Gray’s tea, right? The actor laughs heartily and Jery Ryan laughs too. The actress takes the opportunity to say that she loves Stewart’s work in the new series. “I’ve only seen the first three episodes but I think it’s magnificent, it makes me cry,” he says. “It’s so moving, so emotional, so competent.”

There are some surprising references to Dunkirk in the first episode, referring to the past tragedy of the exodus of millions of Romulan refugees, following the destruction of their empire’s homeworld, in whose rescue Starfleet failed despite Picard’s attempts, somewhat that haunts you. “Yes”. Stewart’s father was on the Dunkirk retreat. “Not exactly, he was part of the British expeditionary force in France in 1939, he escaped on the last ship in Cheburg, just as the German Army Panzers were closing the bag.” There are echoes of Dunkirk, the collective rescue effort, in the Romulian tragedy that has traumatized Picard and also the current drama of the refugees. “Yes, in the interview that she gives to the television in episode 1 and how bad it goes, the interviewer says that the effort that the fleet made was like building the pyramids of Egypt, and Picard ditch: ‘No, no, no, the pyramids were an act of inordinate pride, the most accurate historical image is that of Dunkirk. ‘ The poor interviewer, of course, has no idea what Dunkirk was … “.

Stewart’s father had a very negative impact on his son, drunk and abusive, he was a kind of Darth Vader. The actor is not bothered by the personal twist of the interview and even laughs a bit at the mention of the villain of Star Wars. “Yes, he finished his army service in 1945 as a superstar, he was the highest ranking NCO in his regiment. When I participated in a BBC program on family roots, a man, who had been a sergeant with him, said to me: ‘Do you know what your father did?’, No, he never told me, I replied, ‘well, he fought in Montecasino ‘, that hell. He was then taken to London and charged with reorganizing the Parachute Regiment, which had been decimated in Arnheim, with so many dead and so many prisoners, morale was down and his job was to reestablish it. ‘I think your father was an extraordinary man,’ that sergeant told me. That moved me very deeply, because I knew him as a weak and alcoholic, violent and angry man. So as soon as I found out, and because my mother had suffered so much and I had become a member of Refuge, the UK’s leading domestic violence association, I did research and found out that there was another organization, Combat Stress, to help war veterans, and I joined her. This one for my father, the other for my mother ”.

Patrick Stewart at the premiere for ‘Star Trek: Picard’ in Los Angeles.Getty

Stewart has been visibly moved by the recall, which with his Shakespearean range of voice is absolutely moving and exceptional, and Ryan has put his hand on his arm tenderly. “Anyway, my father had had a very bad press for me for years, I’m afraid.” Picard, by the way, has a very Shakespearean side, the logical thing given that who embodies him is a renowned member of the Royal Shakespeare Company who has played numerous roles as the playwright, including notable Othello, Prospero, Macbeth and Claudio, Hamlet’s stepfather. (and he has said that Shakespeare’s characters prepared him to sit in the captain’s chair of the Enterprise and face galactic dilemmas). Is Picard even more Shakespearean in the new series? “I guess we could say. His life is close to tragedy. I have a theory about classic actors and science fiction. One of the reasons why you find so many actors with that kind of training … ”, like his great friend Ian Mckellen (Gandalf, Magneto), with whom they share the X-Men films (Stewart as the mutant preceptor Charles Xavier, Professor X), apart from having done together Vladimir and Estragon in Esperando to Godot; “Yes Yes; I said it is because there are certain similarities, not only because there are no pockets in the spacesuits as well as in the Shakespearean leotards, it is the scope of the stories, great stories about recognizable people. “

How do captains prefer Picard or Ahab, whom you played in the miniseries? Moby Dick (1998)? “Oh, Ahab is crazy. He is an unstable and dangerous man. I loved doing it. Even more so because there was Gregory Peck, John Huston’s Ahab playing the role of Father Marple, the one Orson Welles played in that version ”. Interestingly, Picard quotes Moby Dick on the bridge of the Enterprise… He has also played Captain Nemo, what a trio of captains! “Right, I did. In Thailand. A television version of The mysterious Island. My Nemo was really cool, and well, honestly, I enjoyed being in Thailand all that time. ” Stewart takes the opportunity to remember that he also appeared, as Gurney Halleck (the Atreides’ weapons master), in “that strange David Lynch sci-fi movie, what was it called?” Dune, “exactly”. What Stewart did not do … he was even the fearsome Praetorian leader Sejanus in I, Claudio, and King Leodegrance, father of Guinevere, in Excalibur by John Boorman!

In the new series, Picard is more of a passenger than a captain – Santiago Cabrera’s role as a space smuggler of the Han Solo race. “Yes”. What is better in a spaceship, being a captain or a passenger? “There is a moment when Picard walks past the captain’s chair and realizes that it is not his, and that he has to take a seat as a passenger … I love being a captain, every part of it; and in that I have to go back to talking about my father, the capacity for leadership and inspiring others ”.

In the plot, in relation to the prohibition of creating artificial beings, there seem to be echoes of Blade Runner. “Hmm, I can’t say, I’m not sure I recognize that.” Fans of Star Trek They would not forgive me for not asking you if a new model of Enterprise. “No, you can see a model hanging in the lobby of Starfleet headquarters, but I think it’s Model D, I’m never really sure about that.” Stewart and Ryan laugh in unison.

Does the actor like Picard practice fencing? “Fencing? I studied for a year. I had two options, fencing or judo. And I wasn’t interested in judo at all, so I chose fencing and I really enjoyed it ”. Saber? “No, it was my master’s weapon, but I used foil, and sword.” Not Jedi lightsaber? “Hahaha no”. Time’s up, Stewart has the detail of printing an autograph on the cover of the book Star Trek, Picard: the classic Chronicles (Titan, 2019), a celebration of the character and the series. With the specimen under one’s arm one can go out into the street and, full of enthusiasm track, see how the world expands towards the limits of known space and beyond, to the last frontier.

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
‘Star Trek: Picard’: Patrick Stewart: “I knew my father as a weak and alcoholic man. Then I discovered his other side ”| TV

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1634413659) } [7]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(14) "Off on a Jaunt" ["link"]=> string(48) "https://wikileaksisdemocracy.org/off-on-a-jaunt/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Susan Paul" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Sat, 16 Oct 2021 19:45:37 +0000" ["category"]=> string(21) "Health & Science News" ["guid"]=> string(48) "https://wikileaksisdemocracy.org/off-on-a-jaunt/" ["description"]=> string(517) "One of the biggest challenges in science fiction is imagining the future of transportation, in particular when the distances to be travelled can be not just international but interplanetary or interstellar in scale. One of the common approaches adopted in science fiction is to consider the possibility of teleportation – the ability to move instantaneously ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(19507) "

One of the biggest challenges in science fiction is imagining the future of transportation, in particular when the distances to be travelled can be not just international but interplanetary or interstellar in scale. One of the common approaches adopted in science fiction is to consider the possibility of teleportation – the ability to move instantaneously between two locations, whether through natural mental abilities or technological means [1].

A Natural Talent

The first of these possibilities – a preternatural ability displayed by some or all individuals to relocate themselves through their own volition – was memorably exploited by Alfred Bester in his novel Tiger! Tiger! (1956, aka The Stars My Destination). While the novel follows protagonist Gully Foyle’s quest for revenge, it is set against a backdrop in which a widespread ability for personal teleportation, known as jaunting, has disrupted economic and social norms, leaving a society off-balance. Various aspects of this state, including the difficulty of maintaining privacy and of confining prisoners are explored:

“There were land riots as the jaunting poor deserted slums to squat in plains and forests, raiding the livestock and wildlife. There was a revolution in home and office building, labyrinths and masking devices had to be introduced to prevent unlawful entry by jaunting. There were crashes and panics and strikes and famines as pre-jaunte industries failed. Plagues and pandemics raised as jaunting vagrants carried disease and vermin into defenceless counties.” – Prologue, Tiger! Tiger!

The unusual abilities of Bester’s jaunters were limited to the capacity to relocate themselves, and telepathy is a gift of just ten people in the whole Solar System. In other science fiction, however, teleportation is often associated with further mental abilities such as telepathy or telekinesis. Such abilities are often discussed in the context of privacy and property concerns. This is the case, for example, in the X-Men franchise, and in Anne McCaffrey’s Talent Universe (short stories and novels, 1969-1999). In an early short story, “Apple” (McCaffrey, 1969), the attempt of those with preternatural Talent to secure legal recognition and protection is almost derailed by a teenager who uses their newly-emerging abilities to steal. It is up to the Talented individuals to locate and restrain the thief. In later novels, the same abilities, now self-regulated into a hierarchy of talent levels, become pivotal in establishing an interstellar transport network, to satisfy the higher energy demands of which high level Talents can draw power from vast arrays of generators. This allows them to command huge salaries and satisfy both their needs and caprices, so that material desires are not a factor in their use of their abilities.

Tomorrow People Stephen, Elizabeth and John all wearing their iconic jaunting beltsA similar appearance of teleportation as part of a suite of mental powers can be found in children’s television series The Tomorrow People (1973-1979, with later reimaginings). Here the jaunting (the name nodding towards Bester’s earlier novel) is intrinsically short-range, difficult to direct with precision, and involves a split-second transition to “hyperspace” with a return to a different location. This rather limited natural ability can be enhanced by a “jaunting belt” (see image, later replaced by a wrist-band) which improves distance, power and direction with the assistance of a bio-electronic computer, TIM. A similar device can be used by a telepath to redirect their personal abilities to teleport other individuals (known as Saps for Homo sapiens). As was the case in the work of Anne McCaffrey then, there is a recognition that human biology might struggle to meet the energy requirements of teleportation; an analogy might be a human athlete who makes a challenging jump with the assistance of a spring board – the intrinsic ability is critical but can be boosted with the right equipment.

The Tomorrow People differs from the Talent series in that, while in both series the fundamental mechanism for teleportation requires an organic intelligence and can draw on external power, jaunting in The Tomorrow People is more compatible with technological modification and redirection. A second difference goes some way towards addressing the ethical challenges that McCaffrey’s Talents faced: the Tomorrow People are naturally constrained by a “Prime Barrier” which prevents killing and is accompanied by a strong moral sensibility regarding the use of their abilities. This leads them to strongly resist pressure to engage in espionage or theft.

While various rationalisations for mental teleportation have been offered up [2], fundamentally these abilities – whether genetic or learnt – lie beyond the limits of physical laws as we know them and would require a new physics paradigm to operate as portrayed in fiction.

Beam Me Up, Scotty

The mental approach to teleportation has the advantage of allowing us to explore the consequences of free movement without worrying about the technical requirements. However some of the most famous examples of teleportation in science fiction involve external, technological solutions to personal transport. Examples include numerous never explained technologies including those used by humans (for example the T-Mat system in “The Seeds of Death”, 1969) or by aliens (e.g. the Sontarans in “The Poison Sky”, 2009) in Doctor Who (1963-present), the Goa’uld Ring system and Asgard transporters in the Stargate universe (1994-2018), the Farcaster door technology used to build multiplanet-houses and a highly mobile society in the Hyperion Cantos (Simmons 1989-1997), and the Treen matter transmitters in comic series Dan Dare (Eagle, 1950). However by far the most well-known example is that of the Enterprise’s transporters in Star Trek.

The Star Trek transporter platform with transport in progress.These devices require a control device at one or both ends of the journey (other examples including those above require instrumentation at both ends or a single device transported with the subject). Its working was not explained in any detail in the original Star Trek series (1966-1969), but was rationalised in the technical manuals written in the 1980s and 1990s and The Physics of Star Trek (Krauss, 1995). As a result, later Star Trek series include a number of details about the transporter technology.

Crucially, this work has clarified two key physics issues which must be considered by any technological solution to teleportation.

The first question which must be addressed is whether the physical body of the subject is being transported or merely its information. In the former case (as is usually considered to be true of mental teleportation or when a passage through hyperspace is involved) the main constraints which arise are those of energy requirements and the fundamental limitation that matter cannot travel faster than the speed of light. In the latter case, which is most commonly assumed for technological teleportation, the speed restriction might be circumvented by invoking a phenomenon known as quantum entanglement, but information requirements may well exceed fundamental quantum limits. Transporters in Star Trek are clearly positioned in the second category: they transport not physical matter (which is stored in local buffers or drawn from the environment) but the information required to construct an individual one atom at a time. Indeed, some episodes (e.g. ST:TNG “Relics”, 1992; ST:Voyager “Counterpoint”, 1998) feature individuals being stored in the transporter “pattern buffers” rather than instantly reconstructed, i.e. existing purely as information for an extended time period.

The second question arises in this information-transfer case, and arises from what we believe to be a fundamental law of quantum physics: how does the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle affect matter reconstruction?

In brief, this principle states that the better we know the location of a particle, the worse we can know its velocity, and vice versa. This is a problem because to reconstruct a human being with their thought processes, memories, organs and nervous systems intact, every cell must be reproduced with precision and effectively at rest relative to one another. If each atom is placed correctly to a fraction of its own size the first requirement will be achieved, but potentially at the cost of those atoms flying apart in different directions a moment later. If their velocity is constrained, then atoms may be sufficiently misplaced to break molecular bonds and shatter the structure of human tissues, causing either instant death or cancers. Whether the limits of the uncertainty principle could ever allow sufficient precision for transportation of living beings is unclear but perhaps unlikely. As a result, it’s long been established canon that Star Trek’s transporters are equipped with “Heisenberg compensators” – their operating principle unknown and lying beyond known physics, but their purpose clear from the name.

Morals and Monstrosities

The role of teleportation in science fiction can essentially be divided between scenarios in which it is simply used to avoid tedious journeys (its original goal in Star Trek) and those in which the consequences of teleportation itself forms the focus. Setting aside the way individuals choose to use teleportation (e.g. crossing borders, theft, spying or other crimes) and the economic consequences (e.g. regulation of trade, ultra-mobile workforces, spread of infectious disease etc), we have to ask what consequences might follow when teleportation goes wrong?

A fun early example of writing exploring the potentials of technological teleportation is the short story “Travel by Wire!” (Arthur C Clarke, 1937). This imagined that by the 1960s, the information transfer of radio and television (at the time of writing itself in its infancy) would be supplemented by transmission of human being by either wired or wireless communications networks. The former is preferred due to the risk of disruption of signal, described in a rapid-fire series of humorous anecdotes which nonetheless capture hideous mutilations and deaths in transition. In some ways the approach described, very much in the spirit of early technology pioneers rather than modern consumer-protection, is highly pragmatic: the fraction of journeys which result in death is small compared to road or air transport so the process is officially safe, but it’s still hard to see the kind of dramatic deaths and deformations described being acceptable in a newly-introduced technology today. Perhaps more worrying still was the suggestion that deliberate distortions could be introduced during the process resulting in weight loss. This is played for laughs by Clarke but could easily be more sinister, and other science fiction has dealt with deliberately influencing humans during the information-transfer stage through viruses (Glasshouse, Stross, 2006) or a form of parasitism (The Fall of Hyperion, Simmons, 1990)

William Riker confronts his transporter duplicate in ST:TNG episode Second ChancesAs well as information loss, another potential complication of information transmission which has been explored in science fiction is that of duplication. This could occur if the same information is reconstructed twice for any reason, rather than a single time, and has been explored in both literary science fiction and in visual media, notably in an original Star Trek episode “The Enemy Within” (1966) where positive and negative versions of Captain Kirk were created [3]. Star Trek: The Next Generation‘s Commander Riker was also duplicated in the episode “Second Chances” (1993), this time as two identical individuals who both had an equal claim on the life both remembered. This duplication effect poses really quite profound questions. If such a thing as a soul exists, how is it associated or transmitted with physical matter, and can it too be duplicated? Even if we set aside the question of souls, how can questions of identity, ownership and friendships be resolved when two individuals have identical bodies and memories? For that matter if a transporter is capable of duplicating the original through reconstruction, is the disassembly process involved in transportation technically a murder of that original?

There are no simple answers to these questions, although an interesting approach was taken by radio dramatist Wally K Daly in his one-off comedy drama Time Slip (BBC radio, 1983). In this story, two men deliberately duplicate themselves and send the unwitting duplicates home to their wives to give themselves more time at the pub… but the duplicates are programmed to explode in a self-destructive climax after a finite period, rather to the shock of the apparently-widowed women. While this is a comedy, and technically focussed more on duplication than transportation, it has moments of drama and pathos which capture the same questions of identity and loss that are explored in more serious science fiction – if there is no way to tell which individual came first, which should a spouse love and cherish, and even if there is a way to tell, is it fair to expect a duplicate identical in every way to accept death, rejection and loss when all their memories tell them they have lived a real life?

Perhaps fortunately, there is no sign that either organic or technological teleportation is likely given our current understanding of physics. While experiments in “quantum teleportation” have made headlines, these have involved the transfer of simple binary information between single elementary particles – a far cry from the vast amount of information required about each of the million, billion, billion, billion particles in a single human body for practical matter transference, let alone the complication of using that information. So the prospect of transporter malfunctions is one we likely won’t have to deal with in the near future. Nonetheless, as more conventional travel, remote working and similar aspects of modern life become ever easier, and property becomes less tangible and easier to access remotely, the questions teleportation fiction asks about how we adapt society to deal with such challenges remain current, as well as giving us an entertaining form of (literal) escapism.

“Off on a Jaunt”, Elizabeth Stanway, Cosmic Stories blog, 16th October 2021.


Notes:

[1] in the interest of brevity I’m restricting myself to examples of teleporting individuals, rather than opening wormholes, e.g. stargates, or instant transport of entire vehicles. [Back to text]

[2] I suggested a couple of decades ago that the teleporters in The Tomorrow People might be their own quantum observer, unconsciously selecting the miniscule fraction of the wave function for each particle in their body that lies in the location they want it to be, such that every atom in every cell of the body is observed to be there a split second after its been observed to be elsewhere. This is fun, but hardly plausible in terms of the information processing capabilities of the human brain, and does nothing to explain the mechanism involved! [Back to text]

[3] In addition to these duplications, Tuvok and Neelix were blended into a combined individual ST:Voyager “Tuvix” (1996). Many, many other examples of transporter malfunctions also exist in the Star Trek universe, most of them resulting in various deformations and horrible deaths. This trope was also parodied effectively in a Galaxy Quest (1999) scene where an animal is “digitised” and rematerialises inside out. Transporter malfunctions are not confined to the Star Trek universe either. In addition to the problems described in Clarke’s “Travel by Wire!”, the semi-comic character Spaceman Albert Digby in Dan Dare: Pilot of the Future, several times found himself landing on his head after a relatively benign malfunction when travelling through a Treen matter transmitter beam. [Back to text]

Off on a Jaunt

" } ["summary"]=> string(517) "One of the biggest challenges in science fiction is imagining the future of transportation, in particular when the distances to be travelled can be not just international but interplanetary or interstellar in scale. One of the common approaches adopted in science fiction is to consider the possibility of teleportation – the ability to move instantaneously ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(19507) "

One of the biggest challenges in science fiction is imagining the future of transportation, in particular when the distances to be travelled can be not just international but interplanetary or interstellar in scale. One of the common approaches adopted in science fiction is to consider the possibility of teleportation – the ability to move instantaneously between two locations, whether through natural mental abilities or technological means [1].

A Natural Talent

The first of these possibilities – a preternatural ability displayed by some or all individuals to relocate themselves through their own volition – was memorably exploited by Alfred Bester in his novel Tiger! Tiger! (1956, aka The Stars My Destination). While the novel follows protagonist Gully Foyle’s quest for revenge, it is set against a backdrop in which a widespread ability for personal teleportation, known as jaunting, has disrupted economic and social norms, leaving a society off-balance. Various aspects of this state, including the difficulty of maintaining privacy and of confining prisoners are explored:

“There were land riots as the jaunting poor deserted slums to squat in plains and forests, raiding the livestock and wildlife. There was a revolution in home and office building, labyrinths and masking devices had to be introduced to prevent unlawful entry by jaunting. There were crashes and panics and strikes and famines as pre-jaunte industries failed. Plagues and pandemics raised as jaunting vagrants carried disease and vermin into defenceless counties.” – Prologue, Tiger! Tiger!

The unusual abilities of Bester’s jaunters were limited to the capacity to relocate themselves, and telepathy is a gift of just ten people in the whole Solar System. In other science fiction, however, teleportation is often associated with further mental abilities such as telepathy or telekinesis. Such abilities are often discussed in the context of privacy and property concerns. This is the case, for example, in the X-Men franchise, and in Anne McCaffrey’s Talent Universe (short stories and novels, 1969-1999). In an early short story, “Apple” (McCaffrey, 1969), the attempt of those with preternatural Talent to secure legal recognition and protection is almost derailed by a teenager who uses their newly-emerging abilities to steal. It is up to the Talented individuals to locate and restrain the thief. In later novels, the same abilities, now self-regulated into a hierarchy of talent levels, become pivotal in establishing an interstellar transport network, to satisfy the higher energy demands of which high level Talents can draw power from vast arrays of generators. This allows them to command huge salaries and satisfy both their needs and caprices, so that material desires are not a factor in their use of their abilities.

Tomorrow People Stephen, Elizabeth and John all wearing their iconic jaunting beltsA similar appearance of teleportation as part of a suite of mental powers can be found in children’s television series The Tomorrow People (1973-1979, with later reimaginings). Here the jaunting (the name nodding towards Bester’s earlier novel) is intrinsically short-range, difficult to direct with precision, and involves a split-second transition to “hyperspace” with a return to a different location. This rather limited natural ability can be enhanced by a “jaunting belt” (see image, later replaced by a wrist-band) which improves distance, power and direction with the assistance of a bio-electronic computer, TIM. A similar device can be used by a telepath to redirect their personal abilities to teleport other individuals (known as Saps for Homo sapiens). As was the case in the work of Anne McCaffrey then, there is a recognition that human biology might struggle to meet the energy requirements of teleportation; an analogy might be a human athlete who makes a challenging jump with the assistance of a spring board – the intrinsic ability is critical but can be boosted with the right equipment.

The Tomorrow People differs from the Talent series in that, while in both series the fundamental mechanism for teleportation requires an organic intelligence and can draw on external power, jaunting in The Tomorrow People is more compatible with technological modification and redirection. A second difference goes some way towards addressing the ethical challenges that McCaffrey’s Talents faced: the Tomorrow People are naturally constrained by a “Prime Barrier” which prevents killing and is accompanied by a strong moral sensibility regarding the use of their abilities. This leads them to strongly resist pressure to engage in espionage or theft.

While various rationalisations for mental teleportation have been offered up [2], fundamentally these abilities – whether genetic or learnt – lie beyond the limits of physical laws as we know them and would require a new physics paradigm to operate as portrayed in fiction.

Beam Me Up, Scotty

The mental approach to teleportation has the advantage of allowing us to explore the consequences of free movement without worrying about the technical requirements. However some of the most famous examples of teleportation in science fiction involve external, technological solutions to personal transport. Examples include numerous never explained technologies including those used by humans (for example the T-Mat system in “The Seeds of Death”, 1969) or by aliens (e.g. the Sontarans in “The Poison Sky”, 2009) in Doctor Who (1963-present), the Goa’uld Ring system and Asgard transporters in the Stargate universe (1994-2018), the Farcaster door technology used to build multiplanet-houses and a highly mobile society in the Hyperion Cantos (Simmons 1989-1997), and the Treen matter transmitters in comic series Dan Dare (Eagle, 1950). However by far the most well-known example is that of the Enterprise’s transporters in Star Trek.

The Star Trek transporter platform with transport in progress.These devices require a control device at one or both ends of the journey (other examples including those above require instrumentation at both ends or a single device transported with the subject). Its working was not explained in any detail in the original Star Trek series (1966-1969), but was rationalised in the technical manuals written in the 1980s and 1990s and The Physics of Star Trek (Krauss, 1995). As a result, later Star Trek series include a number of details about the transporter technology.

Crucially, this work has clarified two key physics issues which must be considered by any technological solution to teleportation.

The first question which must be addressed is whether the physical body of the subject is being transported or merely its information. In the former case (as is usually considered to be true of mental teleportation or when a passage through hyperspace is involved) the main constraints which arise are those of energy requirements and the fundamental limitation that matter cannot travel faster than the speed of light. In the latter case, which is most commonly assumed for technological teleportation, the speed restriction might be circumvented by invoking a phenomenon known as quantum entanglement, but information requirements may well exceed fundamental quantum limits. Transporters in Star Trek are clearly positioned in the second category: they transport not physical matter (which is stored in local buffers or drawn from the environment) but the information required to construct an individual one atom at a time. Indeed, some episodes (e.g. ST:TNG “Relics”, 1992; ST:Voyager “Counterpoint”, 1998) feature individuals being stored in the transporter “pattern buffers” rather than instantly reconstructed, i.e. existing purely as information for an extended time period.

The second question arises in this information-transfer case, and arises from what we believe to be a fundamental law of quantum physics: how does the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle affect matter reconstruction?

In brief, this principle states that the better we know the location of a particle, the worse we can know its velocity, and vice versa. This is a problem because to reconstruct a human being with their thought processes, memories, organs and nervous systems intact, every cell must be reproduced with precision and effectively at rest relative to one another. If each atom is placed correctly to a fraction of its own size the first requirement will be achieved, but potentially at the cost of those atoms flying apart in different directions a moment later. If their velocity is constrained, then atoms may be sufficiently misplaced to break molecular bonds and shatter the structure of human tissues, causing either instant death or cancers. Whether the limits of the uncertainty principle could ever allow sufficient precision for transportation of living beings is unclear but perhaps unlikely. As a result, it’s long been established canon that Star Trek’s transporters are equipped with “Heisenberg compensators” – their operating principle unknown and lying beyond known physics, but their purpose clear from the name.

Morals and Monstrosities

The role of teleportation in science fiction can essentially be divided between scenarios in which it is simply used to avoid tedious journeys (its original goal in Star Trek) and those in which the consequences of teleportation itself forms the focus. Setting aside the way individuals choose to use teleportation (e.g. crossing borders, theft, spying or other crimes) and the economic consequences (e.g. regulation of trade, ultra-mobile workforces, spread of infectious disease etc), we have to ask what consequences might follow when teleportation goes wrong?

A fun early example of writing exploring the potentials of technological teleportation is the short story “Travel by Wire!” (Arthur C Clarke, 1937). This imagined that by the 1960s, the information transfer of radio and television (at the time of writing itself in its infancy) would be supplemented by transmission of human being by either wired or wireless communications networks. The former is preferred due to the risk of disruption of signal, described in a rapid-fire series of humorous anecdotes which nonetheless capture hideous mutilations and deaths in transition. In some ways the approach described, very much in the spirit of early technology pioneers rather than modern consumer-protection, is highly pragmatic: the fraction of journeys which result in death is small compared to road or air transport so the process is officially safe, but it’s still hard to see the kind of dramatic deaths and deformations described being acceptable in a newly-introduced technology today. Perhaps more worrying still was the suggestion that deliberate distortions could be introduced during the process resulting in weight loss. This is played for laughs by Clarke but could easily be more sinister, and other science fiction has dealt with deliberately influencing humans during the information-transfer stage through viruses (Glasshouse, Stross, 2006) or a form of parasitism (The Fall of Hyperion, Simmons, 1990)

William Riker confronts his transporter duplicate in ST:TNG episode Second ChancesAs well as information loss, another potential complication of information transmission which has been explored in science fiction is that of duplication. This could occur if the same information is reconstructed twice for any reason, rather than a single time, and has been explored in both literary science fiction and in visual media, notably in an original Star Trek episode “The Enemy Within” (1966) where positive and negative versions of Captain Kirk were created [3]. Star Trek: The Next Generation‘s Commander Riker was also duplicated in the episode “Second Chances” (1993), this time as two identical individuals who both had an equal claim on the life both remembered. This duplication effect poses really quite profound questions. If such a thing as a soul exists, how is it associated or transmitted with physical matter, and can it too be duplicated? Even if we set aside the question of souls, how can questions of identity, ownership and friendships be resolved when two individuals have identical bodies and memories? For that matter if a transporter is capable of duplicating the original through reconstruction, is the disassembly process involved in transportation technically a murder of that original?

There are no simple answers to these questions, although an interesting approach was taken by radio dramatist Wally K Daly in his one-off comedy drama Time Slip (BBC radio, 1983). In this story, two men deliberately duplicate themselves and send the unwitting duplicates home to their wives to give themselves more time at the pub… but the duplicates are programmed to explode in a self-destructive climax after a finite period, rather to the shock of the apparently-widowed women. While this is a comedy, and technically focussed more on duplication than transportation, it has moments of drama and pathos which capture the same questions of identity and loss that are explored in more serious science fiction – if there is no way to tell which individual came first, which should a spouse love and cherish, and even if there is a way to tell, is it fair to expect a duplicate identical in every way to accept death, rejection and loss when all their memories tell them they have lived a real life?

Perhaps fortunately, there is no sign that either organic or technological teleportation is likely given our current understanding of physics. While experiments in “quantum teleportation” have made headlines, these have involved the transfer of simple binary information between single elementary particles – a far cry from the vast amount of information required about each of the million, billion, billion, billion particles in a single human body for practical matter transference, let alone the complication of using that information. So the prospect of transporter malfunctions is one we likely won’t have to deal with in the near future. Nonetheless, as more conventional travel, remote working and similar aspects of modern life become ever easier, and property becomes less tangible and easier to access remotely, the questions teleportation fiction asks about how we adapt society to deal with such challenges remain current, as well as giving us an entertaining form of (literal) escapism.

“Off on a Jaunt”, Elizabeth Stanway, Cosmic Stories blog, 16th October 2021.


Notes:

[1] in the interest of brevity I’m restricting myself to examples of teleporting individuals, rather than opening wormholes, e.g. stargates, or instant transport of entire vehicles. [Back to text]

[2] I suggested a couple of decades ago that the teleporters in The Tomorrow People might be their own quantum observer, unconsciously selecting the miniscule fraction of the wave function for each particle in their body that lies in the location they want it to be, such that every atom in every cell of the body is observed to be there a split second after its been observed to be elsewhere. This is fun, but hardly plausible in terms of the information processing capabilities of the human brain, and does nothing to explain the mechanism involved! [Back to text]

[3] In addition to these duplications, Tuvok and Neelix were blended into a combined individual ST:Voyager “Tuvix” (1996). Many, many other examples of transporter malfunctions also exist in the Star Trek universe, most of them resulting in various deformations and horrible deaths. This trope was also parodied effectively in a Galaxy Quest (1999) scene where an animal is “digitised” and rematerialises inside out. Transporter malfunctions are not confined to the Star Trek universe either. In addition to the problems described in Clarke’s “Travel by Wire!”, the semi-comic character Spaceman Albert Digby in Dan Dare: Pilot of the Future, several times found himself landing on his head after a relatively benign malfunction when travelling through a Treen matter transmitter beam. [Back to text]

Off on a Jaunt

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1634413537) } [8]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(89) "‘The wheel of time’ signs two of its most important characters – Noticias de series" ["link"]=> string(113) "https://wikileaksisdemocracy.org/the-wheel-of-time-signs-two-of-its-most-important-characters-noticias-de-series/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Susan Paul" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Sat, 16 Oct 2021 19:34:34 +0000" ["category"]=> string(73) "Movie Production CompaniescharactersimportantnoticiasseriessignsTimeWheel" ["guid"]=> string(113) "https://wikileaksisdemocracy.org/the-wheel-of-time-signs-two-of-its-most-important-characters-noticias-de-series/" ["description"]=> string(713) "The adaptation of the Robert Jordan and Brandon Sanderson saga will arrive on Amazon Prime Video next November. The Wheel of Time continues its development before the premiere of its first season next November 19th and has added new signings to its already wide cast. The fiction of Amazon Prime Video aims to become one ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(7213) "

The adaptation of the Robert Jordan and Brandon Sanderson saga will arrive on Amazon Prime Video next November.

The Wheel of Time continues its development before the premiere of its first season next November 19th and has added new signings to its already wide cast. The fiction of Amazon Prime Video aims to become one of the most important series of the year and, if the expectation remains as high as until now, also of the decade. The studio relies on the production and has confirmed three names for the episodes of the second installment.

The new signings are Coveney wax (The Amazing World of Emma), who joins the production to play Elayne Trakand, one of the fan favorites; and Natasha O’Keeffe (Peaky Blinders) and Meera Syal (Yesterday), in two mysterious roles. While all the fans are looking forward to Coveney’s performance as the heir to Andor’s throne, the other two actresses have sparked all kinds of speculation, mainly because there are still many characters to be signed.

The signing of Elayne suggests that the second season could deal with the events of the second part of The eye of the world, which would be a clue for the role of Syal and O’Keeffe. ScreenRant suggests they could be Verin Mathwin and Elaida do Avriny a’Roihan, respectively.

Give Mathwin is an Aes Sedai from Ajah Brown that has a leading role in the saga. She is loved and respected, making her one of the key pieces of the community. She often appears distracted in her own dreams, something she uses as a ruse so that people around her do not underestimate her. Meera Syal would perfectly fit the description of this woman-looking Aes Sedai in her mid-50s.

As to Elaida a’Roihan She is one of the most powerful women in the White Tower and has the Talent of Prediction, which is extremely rare. His story intersects with Rand’s when he arrives at the Royal Palace in Andor and befriends Elaida. O’Keeffe’s physique is very similar to the character’s description in the books, so she could have been chosen for the position.

Guide to enter ‘The Wheel of Time’, the fantasy series that does not make the biggest mistake of ‘Game of Thrones’

With the signing of these actresses, the development of the second season continues. The protagonist, Rosamund Pike, has stated in a recent Q&A that this franchise has made her change her vision about fantasy. “I’ve never been a great fantasy reader, but this one changed my mind. I know that, traditionally, any guiding character in a fantasy world is usually a man and it was very intriguing that this mysterious stranger who comes to town and changes people’s lives forever was a woman“.

The wheel of time it is the perfect example that the interest aroused by fantasy has not died. It has been said many times before, but it is possible that this new series will fill the gap left by the ending. Game of Thronesas it has many ingredients for success. Season 1 of The wheel of time premieres November 19 on Amazon Prime Video.

If you want to be up to date and receive the premieres in your mail, sign up for our Newsletter

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
‘The wheel of time’ signs two of its most important characters – Noticias de series

" } ["summary"]=> string(713) "The adaptation of the Robert Jordan and Brandon Sanderson saga will arrive on Amazon Prime Video next November. The Wheel of Time continues its development before the premiere of its first season next November 19th and has added new signings to its already wide cast. The fiction of Amazon Prime Video aims to become one ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(7213) "

The adaptation of the Robert Jordan and Brandon Sanderson saga will arrive on Amazon Prime Video next November.

The Wheel of Time continues its development before the premiere of its first season next November 19th and has added new signings to its already wide cast. The fiction of Amazon Prime Video aims to become one of the most important series of the year and, if the expectation remains as high as until now, also of the decade. The studio relies on the production and has confirmed three names for the episodes of the second installment.

The new signings are Coveney wax (The Amazing World of Emma), who joins the production to play Elayne Trakand, one of the fan favorites; and Natasha O’Keeffe (Peaky Blinders) and Meera Syal (Yesterday), in two mysterious roles. While all the fans are looking forward to Coveney’s performance as the heir to Andor’s throne, the other two actresses have sparked all kinds of speculation, mainly because there are still many characters to be signed.

The signing of Elayne suggests that the second season could deal with the events of the second part of The eye of the world, which would be a clue for the role of Syal and O’Keeffe. ScreenRant suggests they could be Verin Mathwin and Elaida do Avriny a’Roihan, respectively.

Give Mathwin is an Aes Sedai from Ajah Brown that has a leading role in the saga. She is loved and respected, making her one of the key pieces of the community. She often appears distracted in her own dreams, something she uses as a ruse so that people around her do not underestimate her. Meera Syal would perfectly fit the description of this woman-looking Aes Sedai in her mid-50s.

As to Elaida a’Roihan She is one of the most powerful women in the White Tower and has the Talent of Prediction, which is extremely rare. His story intersects with Rand’s when he arrives at the Royal Palace in Andor and befriends Elaida. O’Keeffe’s physique is very similar to the character’s description in the books, so she could have been chosen for the position.

Guide to enter ‘The Wheel of Time’, the fantasy series that does not make the biggest mistake of ‘Game of Thrones’

With the signing of these actresses, the development of the second season continues. The protagonist, Rosamund Pike, has stated in a recent Q&A that this franchise has made her change her vision about fantasy. “I’ve never been a great fantasy reader, but this one changed my mind. I know that, traditionally, any guiding character in a fantasy world is usually a man and it was very intriguing that this mysterious stranger who comes to town and changes people’s lives forever was a woman“.

The wheel of time it is the perfect example that the interest aroused by fantasy has not died. It has been said many times before, but it is possible that this new series will fill the gap left by the ending. Game of Thronesas it has many ingredients for success. Season 1 of The wheel of time premieres November 19 on Amazon Prime Video.

If you want to be up to date and receive the premieres in your mail, sign up for our Newsletter

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
‘The wheel of time’ signs two of its most important characters – Noticias de series

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1634412874) } [9]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(80) "‘Pray for us’, the terrifying movie for Easter – Cinema and Tv – Culture" ["link"]=> string(99) "https://wikileaksisdemocracy.org/pray-for-us-the-terrifying-movie-for-easter-cinema-and-tv-culture/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Susan Paul" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Sat, 16 Oct 2021 19:33:29 +0000" ["category"]=> string(97) "Movie Production CompaniesCinemaCultureCVirgenEasterMariamoviepornosotrosPrayterrifyingTerrorweek" ["guid"]=> string(99) "https://wikileaksisdemocracy.org/pray-for-us-the-terrifying-movie-for-easter-cinema-and-tv-culture/" ["description"]=> string(672) "Welcome you have created your account in EL TIEMPO. Know and personalize your profile. The verification email will be sent to Check your inbox and if not, in your spam folder. NO, CHANGE EMAIL YES, SEND We want you to find the news that interests you the most Follow your favorite topics in an exclusive ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(12114) "

Pray for us

Pray for us explores terror and religious themes.

It stars Jeffrey Dean Morgan, the famous Negan of The Walking Dead

Horror fans or those who love to be frightened by plots with a religious background in the heat of the days of Holy Week You can be delighted with the premiere of Pray for us (The Unholy), starring Jeffrey Dean Morgan. The good news is that this production will premiere on May 20 in Colombia.

It may interest you: Schedule yourself !: Godzilla vs Kong will be released on March 25

The good news is that the actor’s followers will be able to see him in a different shade, after being busy in the role of Negan in the series. The Walking Dead since 2016. In Pray for Us Dean Morgan plays a long-time journalist trying to find a story that will jump-start his career.

Precisely, on a trip to the American region of New England, he decides to investigate a series of paranormal events involving a young woman who claims to have been visited by the Virgin Mary. However, he witnesses strange events that lead him to a terrifying experience.

Pray for us was directed by Evan Spiliotopoulos, who makes the leap from writer to director, with the help of r Sam Raime (famous for directing the famous horror saga Evil Dead, Drag Me to Hell and The Gift, among others and that here he took the role of producer. Also starring are Cary Elwes, William Sadler, Katie Aselton, Christine Adams, Celeste Oliva, Diogo Morgado.

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‘Pray for us’, the terrifying movie for Easter – Cinema and Tv – Culture

" } ["summary"]=> string(672) "Welcome you have created your account in EL TIEMPO. Know and personalize your profile. The verification email will be sent to Check your inbox and if not, in your spam folder. NO, CHANGE EMAIL YES, SEND We want you to find the news that interests you the most Follow your favorite topics in an exclusive ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(12114) "

Pray for us

Pray for us explores terror and religious themes.

It stars Jeffrey Dean Morgan, the famous Negan of The Walking Dead

Horror fans or those who love to be frightened by plots with a religious background in the heat of the days of Holy Week You can be delighted with the premiere of Pray for us (The Unholy), starring Jeffrey Dean Morgan. The good news is that this production will premiere on May 20 in Colombia.

It may interest you: Schedule yourself !: Godzilla vs Kong will be released on March 25

The good news is that the actor’s followers will be able to see him in a different shade, after being busy in the role of Negan in the series. The Walking Dead since 2016. In Pray for Us Dean Morgan plays a long-time journalist trying to find a story that will jump-start his career.

Precisely, on a trip to the American region of New England, he decides to investigate a series of paranormal events involving a young woman who claims to have been visited by the Virgin Mary. However, he witnesses strange events that lead him to a terrifying experience.

Pray for us was directed by Evan Spiliotopoulos, who makes the leap from writer to director, with the help of r Sam Raime (famous for directing the famous horror saga Evil Dead, Drag Me to Hell and The Gift, among others and that here he took the role of producer. Also starring are Cary Elwes, William Sadler, Katie Aselton, Christine Adams, Celeste Oliva, Diogo Morgado.

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‘Pray for us’, the terrifying movie for Easter – Cinema and Tv – Culture

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