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UNC Press now in the crosshairs of Board of Governors, which is refusing to re-appoint professor who criticized handling of Silent Sam monument

Eric Muller has been the chairman of the UNC Press Board for six of the 10 years he’s been a member. However, the UNC Board of Governors recently refused to re-appoint him. Muller has been critical of the UNC System’s handling of sensitive issues of race and history. Exumphoto.com, www.law.unc.edu Eric Muller served two five-year […]

The post UNC Press now in the crosshairs of Board of Governors, which is refusing to re-appoint professor who criticized handling of Silent Sam monument first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(13831) "
UNC Press now in the crosshairs of Board of Governors, which is refusing to re-appoint professor who criticized handling of Silent Sam monument

Eric Muller has been the chairman of the UNC Press Board for six of the 10 years he’s been a member. However, the UNC Board of Governors recently refused to re-appoint him. Muller has been critical of the UNC System’s handling of sensitive issues of race and history. Exumphoto.com, www.law.unc.edu

Eric Muller served two five-year terms on the UNC Press Board.

In an unprecedented move, the UNC Board of Governors is refusing to re-appoint a respected law professor to the University of North Carolina Press Board of Governors. The reason, say sources directly involved with the process: the professor’s public statements on the legality of the UNC System’s controversial handling of the Silent Sam Confederate monument and UNC-Chapel Hill’s failure to deal appropriately with sensitive issues of race and history.

Eric Muller has served two five-year terms on the board of the UNC Press, which exists to advance “the research, teaching, and public service missions of a great public university by publishing excellent work from leading scholars, writers, and intellectuals and by presenting that work to both academic audiences and general readers.”

Muller spent the last six of those years as chairman, a position to which he was unanimously re-elected this year. Authors, campus leaders and his fellow board members have hailed his leadership, pointing to the way that the board has become diverse in terms of race, gender and geography. Of the board’s 16 elected members, seven are now women and seven are people of color. The board, historically dominated by members from Chapel Hill and N.C. State, now has members from UNC Greensboro, Appalachian State University, North Carolina A&T and N.C. Central University.

But when the UNC Board of Governors’ University Governance Committee met last month, they approved two of the three reappointments submitted to them and refused to consider Muller for reappointment. The committee and its chairman, David Powers, gave no public explanation.

A source close to the process provided e-mails related to the decision to Policy Watch and characterized discussions of which they had direct knowledge. They asked that Policy Watch not identify them so that they could describe closed-session discussions at the committee and UNC Board of Governors level.

“By any metric, Muller has done a remarkable job on that board and as chairman of the board,” the UNC System source said. “There is no defensible reason not to reappoint him that is related to the actual work he has done and the work of the UNC Press. But he’s also been outspoken on some sensitive political issues for the Board of Governors, especially on the Silent Sam deal with the Sons of Confederate Veterans, on the renaming of buildings on the UNC Chapel Hill campus.”

“He’s recently been outspoken on the Nikole Hannah-Jones tenure issue in his role on the Faculty Executive Committee at Chapel Hill,” the source said. “The decision was already made to get rid of him by then, but this is the kind of thing they don’t want someone in that UNC Press role speaking out about. Just strip him of that and he’ll either learn to shut up or the next person in that position will think twice about speaking out against them.”

The move is part of a larger strategy to remove dissenting voices from prominent positions across the UNC System, the source said.

“The thinking is that if the board of governors makes these appointments, they would be stupid to continue appointing people who are going to be critical of decisions they are making for the UNC System as appointees of the North Carolina General Assembly,” the source said. “There was a time when these things were thought of as separate and not connected to the politics. But the way they’re looking at it now, they have no use for anyone who is going to be a critic to be in a prominent position if they can prevent that. It’s just ‘You want to criticise the people who are running this system now and how they’re doing it? You can do that, but you’re not going to do it from inside the tent. There are going to be consequences for that now.’”

Muller has been reluctant to speak on the board’s decision not to reappoint him. But on Monday he provided a written statement to Policy Watch.

“If there is a reason for singling me out in this unprecedented way, the System Board has not shared it with me or with the UNC Press Board,” Muller wrote. “I would hate to think it had something to do with my public commentary in recent years on matters of law, race, and history, such as the law on removal of Confederate monuments, the abortive $2.5 million legal settlement with the Sons of Confederate Veterans, the moratorium on renaming UNC buildings, or the removal of the portrait of slave-trading Judge Thomas Ruffin from the courtroom of our state’s highest court,” Muller wrote. “I would hate to think it had something to do with my focusing public attention on ways in which the law has ignored and harmed the interests of African Americans –and still does. These are matters within my expertise as a legal scholar and historian, the very stuff of the work I do as a university professor.”

“It would be an ominous sign for the values of a leading research university and of a celebrated academic press if our System’s Board of Governors were to single out faculty members for punishment for voicing their views on matters within their expertise and research,” Muller wrote. “Did they do that here? I’d like to hope not. But they knew nothing else about me. They never asked about my service as a Press Board member. They never asked about my leadership as Chair. So it’s hard to imagine a different reason.”

“Completely Illogical”

The UNC Board of Governors approves all appointments to the UNC Press Board of Governors. But until now, the board has followed the recommendations of the campus level nominating committee and the chancellor.

On March 24, UNC Chapel-Hill Chancellor Kevin Guskiewicz sent a letter to UNC System President Peter Hans approving the nominating committee’s recommendation for the  reappointment of Eric Muller, Linda Hanley-Bowdoin and Elizabeth  Engelhardt.

But on May 19 the UNC System office informed Guskiewicz and UNC Press Director John Sherer the University Governance Committee would only consider Engelhardt and Hanley-Bowdoin.

Powers, chair of the committee, said the board wanted to “change the membership on  some of these boards more frequently,” according to a system email obtained by Policy Watch.

David Powers, UNC Board of Governors

That explanation didn’t make sense to UNC Press board members or others directly involved in the appointment process. Muller was being appointed to a third term on the UNC Press board, but so was Hanley-Bowdoin. Englehardt was being appointed to a second full term. The committee expressed no problem with either of their appointments.

“It’s an explanation that makes no sense on its face,” a UNC System source close to the process told Policy Watch. “It is completely illogical. You cannot appoint one person to a third term and not another and then argue people shouldn’t be serving three terms.”

The University Governance Committee asked Guskiewicz to advance another name for the board, but not Muller. Guskiewicz declined to do so, but did not tell the UNC Press board or the director of the UNC press that he’d gotten this request.

The UNC Board of Governors and its committees met on May 26 and 27, approving Hanley-Bowdoin and Engelhardt but not taking up Muller’s appointment. That led Lisa Levenstein, vice chair of the UNC Press board, to write to Powers and UNC System President Peter Hans on June 2 to ask why Muller was not considered and suggest his reappointment be considered at the University Governance Committee’s next meeting.

Hans and Powers didn’t respond personally. Instead, UNC System General Counsel Andrew Tripp wrote a reply on Hans’s behalf in which he declined to “speculate” on the motives for the board approving two of the names forwarded for consideration but not Muller. The UNC System President’s role in the process is simply to forward names to the board of governors, Tripp wrote in an email obtained by Policy Watch.

Sherer, director of the UNC Board, asked for more information on the decision in his regular meeting with Hans but did not receive it.In early June Muller met with Guskiewicz to ask about the circumstances of the decision. Guskiewicz described the chain of events, including the request from Powers and his committee that he forward a name besides Muller’s for consideration. After consulting the board’s by-laws, Guskiewicz said, he declined to do so as they did not allow him to do that.

Policy Watch has requested documents from the UNC System related to Muller’s reappointment and requested interviews with Powers and UNC Board of Governors Chairman Randy Ramsey. As of Monday, Policy Watch has not received the documents it requested or any response from Powers or Ramsey.

“A target on his back”

A member of the UNC Board of Governors spoke with Policy Watch last week on the reappointment issue. They asked not to be identified so that they could speak to internal discussions of the board, including information from closed sessions.

“Muller has been on the radar of some of the board of governors members for a couple of years now,” the  board member said. “There was a lot of anger that there was a prominent UNC law professor talking about the deal with the Sons of Confederate Veterans and saying that it didn’t hold up legally. There were members who really felt like it is not the role of law professors at the university to comment on legal matters involving the university, that they’re supposed to be teaching classes and not making statements to the press about what we do.”

This member said they were not surprised to hear that Muller wasn’t reappointed.

“He has had a target on his back,” the board member said of Muller. “I don’t personally think it is a smart move to go targeting appointments based on someone’s speech or viewpoint, which is supposed to be protected by the First Amendment. I think it’s asking for another lawsuit if we start getting into that with every board that we have any control over. But we have seen that when it comes to politics, this board is fine facing lawsuits. We may not win them, we may see certain things invalidated like with the deal over Silent Sam, but we’ll go to court.”

But the board has been “pretty clever” in the way that they have dealt with withholding appointments, the board member said.

“You saw this with Nikole Hannah-Jones at Chapel Hill and you’re seeing it here,” the board member said. “They didn’t vote down an appointment or refuse to appoint, they just decided not to deal with it at all. They sort of killed it in committee. They didn’t take any action, so they can argue that their hands are clean. They didn’t do anything. It’s non-action. But it amounts to the same thing. It’s not going to happen because they’re not letting it happen. They’re standing in the way of the system and how it usually works.”



originally published at http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ncpolicywatch.com%2F2021%2F06%2F21%2Func-press-now-in-the-crosshairs-of-board-of-governors-which-is-refusing-to-re-appoint-professor-who-criticized-handling-of-silent-sam-moment%2F by Joe Killian

The post UNC Press now in the crosshairs of Board of Governors, which is refusing to re-appoint professor who criticized handling of Silent Sam monument first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" } ["summary"]=> string(1705) "
UNC Press now in the crosshairs of Board of Governors, which is refusing to re-appoint professor who criticized handling of Silent Sam monument

Eric Muller has been the chairman of the UNC Press Board for six of the 10 years he’s been a member. However, the UNC Board of Governors recently refused to re-appoint him. Muller has been critical of the UNC System’s handling of sensitive issues of race and history. Exumphoto.com, www.law.unc.edu Eric Muller served two five-year […]

The post UNC Press now in the crosshairs of Board of Governors, which is refusing to re-appoint professor who criticized handling of Silent Sam monument first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["atom_content"]=> string(13831) "
UNC Press now in the crosshairs of Board of Governors, which is refusing to re-appoint professor who criticized handling of Silent Sam monument

Eric Muller has been the chairman of the UNC Press Board for six of the 10 years he’s been a member. However, the UNC Board of Governors recently refused to re-appoint him. Muller has been critical of the UNC System’s handling of sensitive issues of race and history. Exumphoto.com, www.law.unc.edu

Eric Muller served two five-year terms on the UNC Press Board.

In an unprecedented move, the UNC Board of Governors is refusing to re-appoint a respected law professor to the University of North Carolina Press Board of Governors. The reason, say sources directly involved with the process: the professor’s public statements on the legality of the UNC System’s controversial handling of the Silent Sam Confederate monument and UNC-Chapel Hill’s failure to deal appropriately with sensitive issues of race and history.

Eric Muller has served two five-year terms on the board of the UNC Press, which exists to advance “the research, teaching, and public service missions of a great public university by publishing excellent work from leading scholars, writers, and intellectuals and by presenting that work to both academic audiences and general readers.”

Muller spent the last six of those years as chairman, a position to which he was unanimously re-elected this year. Authors, campus leaders and his fellow board members have hailed his leadership, pointing to the way that the board has become diverse in terms of race, gender and geography. Of the board’s 16 elected members, seven are now women and seven are people of color. The board, historically dominated by members from Chapel Hill and N.C. State, now has members from UNC Greensboro, Appalachian State University, North Carolina A&T and N.C. Central University.

But when the UNC Board of Governors’ University Governance Committee met last month, they approved two of the three reappointments submitted to them and refused to consider Muller for reappointment. The committee and its chairman, David Powers, gave no public explanation.

A source close to the process provided e-mails related to the decision to Policy Watch and characterized discussions of which they had direct knowledge. They asked that Policy Watch not identify them so that they could describe closed-session discussions at the committee and UNC Board of Governors level.

“By any metric, Muller has done a remarkable job on that board and as chairman of the board,” the UNC System source said. “There is no defensible reason not to reappoint him that is related to the actual work he has done and the work of the UNC Press. But he’s also been outspoken on some sensitive political issues for the Board of Governors, especially on the Silent Sam deal with the Sons of Confederate Veterans, on the renaming of buildings on the UNC Chapel Hill campus.”

“He’s recently been outspoken on the Nikole Hannah-Jones tenure issue in his role on the Faculty Executive Committee at Chapel Hill,” the source said. “The decision was already made to get rid of him by then, but this is the kind of thing they don’t want someone in that UNC Press role speaking out about. Just strip him of that and he’ll either learn to shut up or the next person in that position will think twice about speaking out against them.”

The move is part of a larger strategy to remove dissenting voices from prominent positions across the UNC System, the source said.

“The thinking is that if the board of governors makes these appointments, they would be stupid to continue appointing people who are going to be critical of decisions they are making for the UNC System as appointees of the North Carolina General Assembly,” the source said. “There was a time when these things were thought of as separate and not connected to the politics. But the way they’re looking at it now, they have no use for anyone who is going to be a critic to be in a prominent position if they can prevent that. It’s just ‘You want to criticise the people who are running this system now and how they’re doing it? You can do that, but you’re not going to do it from inside the tent. There are going to be consequences for that now.’”

Muller has been reluctant to speak on the board’s decision not to reappoint him. But on Monday he provided a written statement to Policy Watch.

“If there is a reason for singling me out in this unprecedented way, the System Board has not shared it with me or with the UNC Press Board,” Muller wrote. “I would hate to think it had something to do with my public commentary in recent years on matters of law, race, and history, such as the law on removal of Confederate monuments, the abortive $2.5 million legal settlement with the Sons of Confederate Veterans, the moratorium on renaming UNC buildings, or the removal of the portrait of slave-trading Judge Thomas Ruffin from the courtroom of our state’s highest court,” Muller wrote. “I would hate to think it had something to do with my focusing public attention on ways in which the law has ignored and harmed the interests of African Americans –and still does. These are matters within my expertise as a legal scholar and historian, the very stuff of the work I do as a university professor.”

“It would be an ominous sign for the values of a leading research university and of a celebrated academic press if our System’s Board of Governors were to single out faculty members for punishment for voicing their views on matters within their expertise and research,” Muller wrote. “Did they do that here? I’d like to hope not. But they knew nothing else about me. They never asked about my service as a Press Board member. They never asked about my leadership as Chair. So it’s hard to imagine a different reason.”

“Completely Illogical”

The UNC Board of Governors approves all appointments to the UNC Press Board of Governors. But until now, the board has followed the recommendations of the campus level nominating committee and the chancellor.

On March 24, UNC Chapel-Hill Chancellor Kevin Guskiewicz sent a letter to UNC System President Peter Hans approving the nominating committee’s recommendation for the  reappointment of Eric Muller, Linda Hanley-Bowdoin and Elizabeth  Engelhardt.

But on May 19 the UNC System office informed Guskiewicz and UNC Press Director John Sherer the University Governance Committee would only consider Engelhardt and Hanley-Bowdoin.

Powers, chair of the committee, said the board wanted to “change the membership on  some of these boards more frequently,” according to a system email obtained by Policy Watch.

David Powers, UNC Board of Governors

That explanation didn’t make sense to UNC Press board members or others directly involved in the appointment process. Muller was being appointed to a third term on the UNC Press board, but so was Hanley-Bowdoin. Englehardt was being appointed to a second full term. The committee expressed no problem with either of their appointments.

“It’s an explanation that makes no sense on its face,” a UNC System source close to the process told Policy Watch. “It is completely illogical. You cannot appoint one person to a third term and not another and then argue people shouldn’t be serving three terms.”

The University Governance Committee asked Guskiewicz to advance another name for the board, but not Muller. Guskiewicz declined to do so, but did not tell the UNC Press board or the director of the UNC press that he’d gotten this request.

The UNC Board of Governors and its committees met on May 26 and 27, approving Hanley-Bowdoin and Engelhardt but not taking up Muller’s appointment. That led Lisa Levenstein, vice chair of the UNC Press board, to write to Powers and UNC System President Peter Hans on June 2 to ask why Muller was not considered and suggest his reappointment be considered at the University Governance Committee’s next meeting.

Hans and Powers didn’t respond personally. Instead, UNC System General Counsel Andrew Tripp wrote a reply on Hans’s behalf in which he declined to “speculate” on the motives for the board approving two of the names forwarded for consideration but not Muller. The UNC System President’s role in the process is simply to forward names to the board of governors, Tripp wrote in an email obtained by Policy Watch.

Sherer, director of the UNC Board, asked for more information on the decision in his regular meeting with Hans but did not receive it.In early June Muller met with Guskiewicz to ask about the circumstances of the decision. Guskiewicz described the chain of events, including the request from Powers and his committee that he forward a name besides Muller’s for consideration. After consulting the board’s by-laws, Guskiewicz said, he declined to do so as they did not allow him to do that.

Policy Watch has requested documents from the UNC System related to Muller’s reappointment and requested interviews with Powers and UNC Board of Governors Chairman Randy Ramsey. As of Monday, Policy Watch has not received the documents it requested or any response from Powers or Ramsey.

“A target on his back”

A member of the UNC Board of Governors spoke with Policy Watch last week on the reappointment issue. They asked not to be identified so that they could speak to internal discussions of the board, including information from closed sessions.

“Muller has been on the radar of some of the board of governors members for a couple of years now,” the  board member said. “There was a lot of anger that there was a prominent UNC law professor talking about the deal with the Sons of Confederate Veterans and saying that it didn’t hold up legally. There were members who really felt like it is not the role of law professors at the university to comment on legal matters involving the university, that they’re supposed to be teaching classes and not making statements to the press about what we do.”

This member said they were not surprised to hear that Muller wasn’t reappointed.

“He has had a target on his back,” the board member said of Muller. “I don’t personally think it is a smart move to go targeting appointments based on someone’s speech or viewpoint, which is supposed to be protected by the First Amendment. I think it’s asking for another lawsuit if we start getting into that with every board that we have any control over. But we have seen that when it comes to politics, this board is fine facing lawsuits. We may not win them, we may see certain things invalidated like with the deal over Silent Sam, but we’ll go to court.”

But the board has been “pretty clever” in the way that they have dealt with withholding appointments, the board member said.

“You saw this with Nikole Hannah-Jones at Chapel Hill and you’re seeing it here,” the board member said. “They didn’t vote down an appointment or refuse to appoint, they just decided not to deal with it at all. They sort of killed it in committee. They didn’t take any action, so they can argue that their hands are clean. They didn’t do anything. It’s non-action. But it amounts to the same thing. It’s not going to happen because they’re not letting it happen. They’re standing in the way of the system and how it usually works.”



originally published at http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ncpolicywatch.com%2F2021%2F06%2F21%2Func-press-now-in-the-crosshairs-of-board-of-governors-which-is-refusing-to-re-appoint-professor-who-criticized-handling-of-silent-sam-moment%2F by Joe Killian

The post UNC Press now in the crosshairs of Board of Governors, which is refusing to re-appoint professor who criticized handling of Silent Sam monument first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1624300819) } [1]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(77) "The Curriculum: Guilford College Presidential Quest | Weblog: The curriculum" ["link"]=> string(105) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/the-curriculum-guilford-college-presidential-quest-weblog-the-curriculum/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Bill Moran" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Mon, 21 Jun 2021 18:38:47 +0000" ["category"]=> string(10) "Greensboro" ["guid"]=> string(39) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/?p=8750" ["description"]=> string(1513) "
The Curriculum: Guilford College Presidential Quest |  Blog: The curriculum

The UNCG trustees took a similar approach – they invited some people from outside the committee to meet the finalists, but swore to keep them secret – when they conducted the search in 2015 that led to the hiring of Frank Gilliam. I call it looking for a crack in the door: it’s a bit […]

The post The Curriculum: Guilford College Presidential Quest | Weblog: The curriculum first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(2412) "
The Curriculum: Guilford College Presidential Quest |  Blog: The curriculum

The UNCG trustees took a similar approach – they invited some people from outside the committee to meet the finalists, but swore to keep them secret – when they conducted the search in 2015 that led to the hiring of Frank Gilliam. I call it looking for a crack in the door: it’s a bit open, but not enough to really see anything from the outside.

Of course, Guilford is private and can go around looking for a new president pretty much at will. However, Guilford speaks more publicly about his search than many other schools.

In Friday’s update, the selection committee didn’t say when the college might appoint a new president. Winslow told me last month that he anticipates it will likely happen in August, even though the trustees have not set a deadline.

Guilford has, what is worth, the only active presidential election among the area’s colleges and universities. But two other triad schools are about to receive new leaders.

The Salem Academy and College announced their new president earlier this month. Summer McGee, founding dean of the School of Health Sciences at the University of New Haven, Connecticut, begins July 1.

The post The Curriculum: Guilford College Presidential Quest | Weblog: The curriculum first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" } ["summary"]=> string(1513) "
The Curriculum: Guilford College Presidential Quest |  Blog: The curriculum

The UNCG trustees took a similar approach – they invited some people from outside the committee to meet the finalists, but swore to keep them secret – when they conducted the search in 2015 that led to the hiring of Frank Gilliam. I call it looking for a crack in the door: it’s a bit […]

The post The Curriculum: Guilford College Presidential Quest | Weblog: The curriculum first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["atom_content"]=> string(2412) "
The Curriculum: Guilford College Presidential Quest |  Blog: The curriculum

The UNCG trustees took a similar approach – they invited some people from outside the committee to meet the finalists, but swore to keep them secret – when they conducted the search in 2015 that led to the hiring of Frank Gilliam. I call it looking for a crack in the door: it’s a bit open, but not enough to really see anything from the outside.

Of course, Guilford is private and can go around looking for a new president pretty much at will. However, Guilford speaks more publicly about his search than many other schools.

In Friday’s update, the selection committee didn’t say when the college might appoint a new president. Winslow told me last month that he anticipates it will likely happen in August, even though the trustees have not set a deadline.

Guilford has, what is worth, the only active presidential election among the area’s colleges and universities. But two other triad schools are about to receive new leaders.

The Salem Academy and College announced their new president earlier this month. Summer McGee, founding dean of the School of Health Sciences at the University of New Haven, Connecticut, begins July 1.

The post The Curriculum: Guilford College Presidential Quest | Weblog: The curriculum first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1624300727) } [2]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(42) "Amazon Future Engineer Teacher of the Year" ["link"]=> string(75) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/amazon-future-engineer-teacher-of-the-year/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Bill Moran" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Mon, 21 Jun 2021 17:18:47 +0000" ["category"]=> string(9) "Charlotte" ["guid"]=> string(39) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/?p=8747" ["description"]=> string(1581) "
Amazon Future Engineer Teacher of the Year

Pierce will receive a prize package worth more than $ 30,000, including $ 25,000, to expand computer science and / or robotics education at her school. CHARLOTTE, NC – Michelle Pierce, middle school computer science teacher at Mallard Creek STEM Academy, was selected from among thousands of qualified teachers to be the recipient of the […]

The post Amazon Future Engineer Teacher of the Year first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(4546) "
Amazon Future Engineer Teacher of the Year

Pierce will receive a prize package worth more than $ 30,000, including $ 25,000, to expand computer science and / or robotics education at her school.

CHARLOTTE, NC – Michelle Pierce, middle school computer science teacher at Mallard Creek STEM Academy, was selected from among thousands of qualified teachers to be the recipient of the Amazon Future Engineer Teacher of the Year 2021.

Pierce will receive a package worth more than $ 30,000 that includes $ 25,000 for expanding computer science and / or robotics education at their school, as well as a $ 5,000 award for teachers.

Mallard Creek STEM Academy plans to use the award to acquire more technology to improve their STEM, robotics, and computer science programs, as well as to help develop a competitive robotics team to give students the opportunity to innovate robotics designs experience.

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“I was shocked, but very excited, mostly because this was such a tough school year,” said Pierce. “This award will give us additional resources to reach more students and get more students, especially girls and color students, excited about computer science.”

“We are very honored to have Ms. Pierce as an employee here at MCSA. We are very grateful for their hard work and dedication in building our computer science program. If anyone deserves this award, it is definitely them, “said Raheem Roberts, assistant principal, Mallard Creek STEM Academy.

Pierce is a dedicated computer science teacher who designs the curriculum to be more inclusive for students of all skill levels. Her personal mission is to introduce students to the contributions of African Americans and women in STEM and computer science. Michelle is a member of the Computer Science Teacher Association, where she uses her voice to advocate for underrepresented populations.

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“It’s been a particularly difficult year for teachers, so we’re excited to recognize their hard work and dedication to the success of their students,” said Victor Reinoso, global director, Amazon Future Engineer, Amazon in the community. “Recipients of the Amazon Future Engineer Teacher of the Year Award work diligently to help students in underserved and underrepresented communities build life-changing skills to advance their future in computer science. We celebrate their relentless efforts to improve access to technology and computing skills in their classrooms and beyond. ”

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The post Amazon Future Engineer Teacher of the Year first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" } ["summary"]=> string(1581) "
Amazon Future Engineer Teacher of the Year

Pierce will receive a prize package worth more than $ 30,000, including $ 25,000, to expand computer science and / or robotics education at her school. CHARLOTTE, NC – Michelle Pierce, middle school computer science teacher at Mallard Creek STEM Academy, was selected from among thousands of qualified teachers to be the recipient of the […]

The post Amazon Future Engineer Teacher of the Year first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["atom_content"]=> string(4546) "
Amazon Future Engineer Teacher of the Year

Pierce will receive a prize package worth more than $ 30,000, including $ 25,000, to expand computer science and / or robotics education at her school.

CHARLOTTE, NC – Michelle Pierce, middle school computer science teacher at Mallard Creek STEM Academy, was selected from among thousands of qualified teachers to be the recipient of the Amazon Future Engineer Teacher of the Year 2021.

Pierce will receive a package worth more than $ 30,000 that includes $ 25,000 for expanding computer science and / or robotics education at their school, as well as a $ 5,000 award for teachers.

Mallard Creek STEM Academy plans to use the award to acquire more technology to improve their STEM, robotics, and computer science programs, as well as to help develop a competitive robotics team to give students the opportunity to innovate robotics designs experience.

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“I was shocked, but very excited, mostly because this was such a tough school year,” said Pierce. “This award will give us additional resources to reach more students and get more students, especially girls and color students, excited about computer science.”

“We are very honored to have Ms. Pierce as an employee here at MCSA. We are very grateful for their hard work and dedication in building our computer science program. If anyone deserves this award, it is definitely them, “said Raheem Roberts, assistant principal, Mallard Creek STEM Academy.

Pierce is a dedicated computer science teacher who designs the curriculum to be more inclusive for students of all skill levels. Her personal mission is to introduce students to the contributions of African Americans and women in STEM and computer science. Michelle is a member of the Computer Science Teacher Association, where she uses her voice to advocate for underrepresented populations.

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“It’s been a particularly difficult year for teachers, so we’re excited to recognize their hard work and dedication to the success of their students,” said Victor Reinoso, global director, Amazon Future Engineer, Amazon in the community. “Recipients of the Amazon Future Engineer Teacher of the Year Award work diligently to help students in underserved and underrepresented communities build life-changing skills to advance their future in computer science. We celebrate their relentless efforts to improve access to technology and computing skills in their classrooms and beyond. ”

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The post Amazon Future Engineer Teacher of the Year first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1624295927) } [3]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(81) "New Report: Tech Openings Across NC – Raleigh 60% Up, Durham-Chapel Hill 30% Up" ["link"]=> string(106) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/new-report-tech-openings-across-nc-raleigh-60-up-durham-chapel-hill-30-up/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Bill Moran" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Mon, 21 Jun 2021 16:36:18 +0000" ["category"]=> string(7) "Raleigh" ["guid"]=> string(39) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/?p=8744" ["description"]=> string(1663) "
New Report: Tech Openings Across NC - Raleigh 60% Up, Durham-Chapel Hill 30% Up

RALEIGH – The number of high-tech job vacancies across North Carolina rose again in Mat, reaching nearly 37,000 as the state’s economy continued to recover from the pandemic. This is what it says in the current IT job trend report by the NC Technology Association. The new numbers reflect the continued growing demand for talent […]

The post New Report: Tech Openings Across NC - Raleigh 60% Up, Durham-Chapel Hill 30% Up first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(5569) "
New Report: Tech Openings Across NC - Raleigh 60% Up, Durham-Chapel Hill 30% Up

RALEIGH – The number of high-tech job vacancies across North Carolina rose again in Mat, reaching nearly 37,000 as the state’s economy continued to recover from the pandemic.

This is what it says in the current IT job trend report by the NC Technology Association.

The new numbers reflect the continued growing demand for talent across the state’s economy. For example, according to WRAL TechWire in its exclusive Job Report published every Monday, more than 40,000 jobs across the triangle are listed as open.

The number of jobs rose to 36,947 in May, up from 35,853 in April. The number of vacancies rose by more than 60% year-on-year. And in the RTP area, the attitude is particularly strong.

The vacancies in the triangle rose to more than 15,000. Raleigh positions increased 60% year over year to 10,831.

At Durham-Chapel Hill, openings rose nearly 30% to 4,024.

In the Charlotte Underground, advertised jobs rose almost 43% year-on-year to 11,713.

So what’s going on right now?

“As analysts and reports continue to signal a return to the country’s pandemic economy, employers are looking to invest in resources and skills that can help make up for last year of delayed progress and stunted innovation,” the report said.

The May total is the third highest since January, when the economic recovery took hold. Only the 40,482 in March and 38,777 in February were higher.

“This continues the recovery trend from the early economic impact of COVID as there was a hiring break in April and May of last year, while in April and May of this year, near-top jobs were achieved in the last 12 months,” said NC Brooks Raiford, TECH CEO.

Compared to May last year, the increase is astonishing, according to data from NC TECH and sponsors Clarkston Consulting and Momentum – 23,058 to 36,947.

Fayetteville, meanwhile, is one of the hottest job markets, with job openings up nearly 70% to 1,690.

NC TECH graphics

The breakdown by metro compared to May 2020:

Who is hiring?

It’s not just tech companies that are looking for jobs. Other companies need IT skills.

Here are the top 10 tech talents, according to the report:

More job headlines

Attention Job Seekers: Recruiting sites report up to 55,000 vacancies in Triangle

Large companies – IBM, Cisco, Cree, Fidelity, others – looking for talent in Triangle

The post New Report: Tech Openings Across NC - Raleigh 60% Up, Durham-Chapel Hill 30% Up first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" } ["summary"]=> string(1663) "
New Report: Tech Openings Across NC - Raleigh 60% Up, Durham-Chapel Hill 30% Up

RALEIGH – The number of high-tech job vacancies across North Carolina rose again in Mat, reaching nearly 37,000 as the state’s economy continued to recover from the pandemic. This is what it says in the current IT job trend report by the NC Technology Association. The new numbers reflect the continued growing demand for talent […]

The post New Report: Tech Openings Across NC - Raleigh 60% Up, Durham-Chapel Hill 30% Up first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["atom_content"]=> string(5569) "
New Report: Tech Openings Across NC - Raleigh 60% Up, Durham-Chapel Hill 30% Up

RALEIGH – The number of high-tech job vacancies across North Carolina rose again in Mat, reaching nearly 37,000 as the state’s economy continued to recover from the pandemic.

This is what it says in the current IT job trend report by the NC Technology Association.

The new numbers reflect the continued growing demand for talent across the state’s economy. For example, according to WRAL TechWire in its exclusive Job Report published every Monday, more than 40,000 jobs across the triangle are listed as open.

The number of jobs rose to 36,947 in May, up from 35,853 in April. The number of vacancies rose by more than 60% year-on-year. And in the RTP area, the attitude is particularly strong.

The vacancies in the triangle rose to more than 15,000. Raleigh positions increased 60% year over year to 10,831.

At Durham-Chapel Hill, openings rose nearly 30% to 4,024.

In the Charlotte Underground, advertised jobs rose almost 43% year-on-year to 11,713.

So what’s going on right now?

“As analysts and reports continue to signal a return to the country’s pandemic economy, employers are looking to invest in resources and skills that can help make up for last year of delayed progress and stunted innovation,” the report said.

The May total is the third highest since January, when the economic recovery took hold. Only the 40,482 in March and 38,777 in February were higher.

“This continues the recovery trend from the early economic impact of COVID as there was a hiring break in April and May of last year, while in April and May of this year, near-top jobs were achieved in the last 12 months,” said NC Brooks Raiford, TECH CEO.

Compared to May last year, the increase is astonishing, according to data from NC TECH and sponsors Clarkston Consulting and Momentum – 23,058 to 36,947.

Fayetteville, meanwhile, is one of the hottest job markets, with job openings up nearly 70% to 1,690.

NC TECH graphics

The breakdown by metro compared to May 2020:

Who is hiring?

It’s not just tech companies that are looking for jobs. Other companies need IT skills.

Here are the top 10 tech talents, according to the report:

More job headlines

Attention Job Seekers: Recruiting sites report up to 55,000 vacancies in Triangle

Large companies – IBM, Cisco, Cree, Fidelity, others – looking for talent in Triangle

The post New Report: Tech Openings Across NC - Raleigh 60% Up, Durham-Chapel Hill 30% Up first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1624293378) } [4]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(40) "Durham-Middlefield Area Events this week" ["link"]=> string(73) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/durham-middlefield-area-events-this-week/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Bill Moran" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Mon, 21 Jun 2021 16:34:06 +0000" ["category"]=> string(6) "Durham" ["guid"]=> string(39) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/?p=8741" ["description"]=> string(1186) "
Patch News

DURHAM-MIDDLEFIELD, CT – Looking for something to do this week? As more local businesses and venues reopen and it becomes safer to gather in small groups, don’t miss the news on your Durham-Middlefield Patch Community Calendar. Here are some of the events happening in town this week. Would you like to see your event in […]

The post Durham-Middlefield Area Events this week first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(6672) "
Patch News

DURHAM-MIDDLEFIELD, CT – Looking for something to do this week? As more local businesses and venues reopen and it becomes safer to gather in small groups, don’t miss the news on your Durham-Middlefield Patch Community Calendar. Here are some of the events happening in town this week.

Would you like to see your event in the next roundup? You can add it to the calendar using this form. As always, it’s free to post an event on your community. To reach more people, promote your event and share it nearby for $ 1 per day per community.

Meditation (becoming aware of yourself) in Durham-Middlefield

Hot Fingers STAR WARS Trivia @ 1741 Pub and Grill!

Recommended event: workshops at the middle school

Recommended Event: Middle School Workshops (Michelle Helmin)

Story time with Levi E. Coe Library in Lyman Orchards!

MixTape Match @ 1741 Pub & Grill

Envision Networking (online speed networking) in Durham-Middlefield

Live comedy night with Kerri Louise Cotter

Live music ~ John Ciambriello in the 1741 Pub and Grill!

Adoption event of the Meriden Humane Society in Lyman Orchards!

Touch A Fire Truck @ Lyman Orchards

Check out more great local events or add your own to the Durham-Middlefield Patch Community Calendar.

Editor’s note: This article was automatically generated based on event information provided primarily by community members. Patch has not independently verified most of this information, always check with the organizers to make sure the announced events go as planned. Click on any event in the list for more information. You can also contact content@patch.com if you have any questions or other feedback on this article.

The post Durham-Middlefield Area Events this week first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" } ["summary"]=> string(1186) "
Patch News

DURHAM-MIDDLEFIELD, CT – Looking for something to do this week? As more local businesses and venues reopen and it becomes safer to gather in small groups, don’t miss the news on your Durham-Middlefield Patch Community Calendar. Here are some of the events happening in town this week. Would you like to see your event in […]

The post Durham-Middlefield Area Events this week first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["atom_content"]=> string(6672) "
Patch News

DURHAM-MIDDLEFIELD, CT – Looking for something to do this week? As more local businesses and venues reopen and it becomes safer to gather in small groups, don’t miss the news on your Durham-Middlefield Patch Community Calendar. Here are some of the events happening in town this week.

Would you like to see your event in the next roundup? You can add it to the calendar using this form. As always, it’s free to post an event on your community. To reach more people, promote your event and share it nearby for $ 1 per day per community.

Meditation (becoming aware of yourself) in Durham-Middlefield

Hot Fingers STAR WARS Trivia @ 1741 Pub and Grill!

Recommended event: workshops at the middle school

Recommended Event: Middle School Workshops (Michelle Helmin)

Story time with Levi E. Coe Library in Lyman Orchards!

MixTape Match @ 1741 Pub & Grill

Envision Networking (online speed networking) in Durham-Middlefield

Live comedy night with Kerri Louise Cotter

Live music ~ John Ciambriello in the 1741 Pub and Grill!

Adoption event of the Meriden Humane Society in Lyman Orchards!

Touch A Fire Truck @ Lyman Orchards

Check out more great local events or add your own to the Durham-Middlefield Patch Community Calendar.

Editor’s note: This article was automatically generated based on event information provided primarily by community members. Patch has not independently verified most of this information, always check with the organizers to make sure the announced events go as planned. Click on any event in the list for more information. You can also contact content@patch.com if you have any questions or other feedback on this article.

The post Durham-Middlefield Area Events this week first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1624293246) } [5]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(136) "NC failed to meet court-ordered deadlines for moving people with mental illnesses out of adult care homes. But it got another extension." ["link"]=> string(167) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/nc-failed-to-meet-court-ordered-deadlines-for-moving-people-with-mental-illnesses-out-of-adult-care-homes-but-it-got-another-extension/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Bill Moran" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Mon, 21 Jun 2021 15:31:17 +0000" ["category"]=> string(4) "News" ["guid"]=> string(39) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/?p=8738" ["description"]=> string(1662) "
NC failed to meet court-ordered deadlines for moving people with mental illnesses out of adult care homes. But it got another extension.

Image: Adobe Stock Service gaps, lack of central control over regional offices, COVID-19 pandemic contribute to “mission drift” North Carolina had eight years under a 2012 court order to move 2,000 people with mental illnesses out of adult care homes and into houses or apartments. A few years ago, the state received an extension to […]

The post NC failed to meet court-ordered deadlines for moving people with mental illnesses out of adult care homes. But it got another extension. first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(18010) "
NC failed to meet court-ordered deadlines for moving people with mental illnesses out of adult care homes. But it got another extension.

Image: Adobe Stock

Service gaps, lack of central control over regional offices, COVID-19 pandemic contribute to “mission drift”

North Carolina had eight years under a 2012 court order to move 2,000 people with mental illnesses out of adult care homes and into houses or apartments. A few years ago, the state received an extension to this July. It won’t make that deadline, either.

The U.S. Department of Justice and North Carolina negotiated the original court order after a federal investigation found that the state was using adult care homes to warehouse people with severe mental illnesses in violation of the U.S. Supreme Court’s Olmstead decision. Under the Americans with Disabilities Act, people “have the right to receive services in the most integrated settings possible,” the Justice Department said then.  

The court settlement required the state to find and help pay for 3,000 housing units for people with severe mental illnesses and to move 2,000 people from adult care homes into community housing by July 2020.  

The state found ways to get the required number of affordable apartments and houses, but missed other major targets. It has not reached the goal of moving people from adult care homes, which was central to the court agreement. It continues to fall short of providing community mental health services that would help people leaving those homes to successfully live on their own, and in supporting people with severe mental illnesses who want jobs.  

The agreement has been modified four times since 2012. A federal court judge signed the latest change in March. It gives the states another two years, until July 1, 2023, to reach the housing goal. In the next two years, the state must help another 840 people leave adult care homes. It must also continue to work to keep people from going into adult care homes in the first place, and help people leaving psychiatric hospitals find housing.  

People who were diverted from adult care home placements are occupying most of the nearly 3,000 housing slots.  

Corye Dunn, Disability Rights NC

Corye Dunn, director of public policy at Disability Rights NC, said the results of the community housing effort are an example of “mission drift,” evidence that the state Department of Health and Human Services does not have enough control over the regional mental health offices that oversee county community services. Those regional mental health offices are called Local Management Entities/Managed Care Organizations.  

The state contracts with the LMEs, which receive federal, state, and local money. LMEs pay the mental health providers who work with residents.  

“With the lack of centralized authority, sometimes ineffective practices go relatively unchecked,” Dunn said. “If they’re not cultivating providers, ensuring fidelity to an evidence-based model, and if you’re not ensuring adequate training and adequate payment to retain them in those services, you’re going to get those patchy, inconsistent results.” 

The state needs to focus on building a network of mental health service providers, Dunn said.  

“That’s going to take active management. It’s not going to happen just organically,” she said. “We can’t pretend that our network as it exists is adequate. It’s not.” 

Martha Knisley is an independent reviewer who monitors the state’s progress toward the goals set out in the court order and files reports each year. Those reports are based on document reviews and interviews with dozens of people: current and former residents of adult care homes, as well as people in psychiatric hospitals, service providers, staff from regional mental health offices, and state staff.  

The most recent report is for fiscal year 2020, which ended in June 2020, but focuses on information and trends from the last six months of 2020.  

In the report, Knisley applauded the state for finding ways to increase housing available for people with mental illnesses and for likely reaching the 3,000-unit goal by July 1. But North Carolina has fallen “far short” of meeting goals for moving people out of adult care homes and for “providing access to the array, frequency, and intensity of individualized recovery-based services and supports necessary to enable individuals to transition to and live in community-based settings.” 

She also noted in the latest review that the state hadn’t made progress in transitioning people out of nursing homes over the previous year, and had actually slipped a little. 

Sam Hedrick, senior advisor for the ADA and the Olmstead Act

Sam Hedrick, senior advisor for the ADA and the Olmstead Act at the state Department of Health and Human Services, had a brighter assessment. There is room for improvement, she said, but the state is closer to meeting the 2,000-person goal than it was when Knisley finished her latest review.  

By the end of March, 1,630 people who had been living in nursing home were in supported housing, Hedrick said. Considering that people who are moving are older and many have complex physical needs, the LMEs are doing well, she said.  

The regional agencies are working to make sure that older people with mental illnesses leaving adult care homes have primary care providers and any necessary home health or personal care services in place when they move out, she said. 

COVID-19 slowed some of the effort because workers couldn’t get into adult care homes to talk to people, Hedrick said. They made some modifications using technology or by meeting with people outside. The work is getting back on track, she said, and the state will definitely meet the settlement goals by 2023.  

“We have spent a lot of time laser-focused on adult care homes as a priority population,” Hedrick said. “We had a really good plan. Unfortunately, COVID took the wind out of our sails last year.” 

People in adult care homes say follow-up is lacking

As part of their work, Knisley and her team go into adult care homes to interview people living there. Knisley told Policy Watch this week that “gaps in time” are a problem.

If people are presented with the idea that they can move out of an adult care home, but there’s no timely follow-up, reluctance can set in, Knisley said. “People would express their interest in housing and employment, and it didn’t happen.” 

One person living in an adult care home said that community living is “a hoax,” because someone talked to her about moving but she never got the chance to leave, Knisley said. 

Some who moved into community housing said they did not get timely connections to mental health workers.  

There were “gaps in providers not meeting with people early on,” Knisley said. If there’s no relationship between the provider and the individual, “services break down and were not effective,” she said.  

Few people who they wanted to work actually received help preparing for or finding jobs, the review found.  

Some were told that they would lose their benefits if they got jobs, but were not offered counseling to determine how much they could earn and keep their benefits. Others were told that, for various reasons, they weren’t ready to work.  

Sometimes it’s hard for guardians or counselors to believe that people with severe mental illnesses can work, Knisley said in the interview. “It’s our hesitance about people going to work that sometimes gets in the way,” she said.  

One woman wanted to learn to use a laptop so she could search for part-time work and connect with people, Knisley said. One man wanted to get his high school diploma. Another started a business.  

Hedrick said COVID stopped the plan to improve supported employment, but it’s picking up speed again. “We’re going to see some improvement this year,” she said.  

In her report, Knisley said state contracts with the LMEs don’t clearly detail the obligations the regional offices have under the court settlement.  

“The State has failed to spell out obligations clearly for specific requirements in contracts and to monitor the effectiveness of their guidance and requirements over time,” she wrote. “This has led to the State’s failure to meet the services obligations in this Agreement.” 

In an interview, Knisley said the state is moving in the right direction. Next year, as part of the move to managed care for state Medicaid, people who have severe mental illnesses or developmental disabilities can enroll in what the state calls “tailored plans,” or souped-up health plans that will include both mental and physical health care. With the first contracts, only existing LME/MCOs are allowed to offer tailored plans.  

The state has made the court settlement requirements part of the tailored plan requirements, Knisley said.  

“I do think you’ll see more improvements in services,” she said.  

Hedrick agreed that the move to tailored plans will help. “We can actually set expectations and outcomes we want to see,” she said.  

Dunn of Disability Rights NC, however, anticipates even more problems will arise when regional mental health organizations add physical heath to their responsibilities.  

The regional mental health agencies haven’t been able to meet the court settlement requirements, work that required a lot of coordination. It’s hard to imagine things will get better when they are in charge of coordinating physical health care too, she said.  

“I hope it will improve with the move to Medicaid managed care,” Dunn said. “It can’t get worse.” 

How did the state get 3,000 affordable houses and apartments for people with mental illnesses?
In the first few years after the state agreed to find 3,000 affordable rental units for people with mental illnesses, it didn’t look like it was going to hit the target.

Eventually, the state developed a plan, and DHHS, the NC Housing Finance Agency, and the LMEs started working together to find new money and use it effectively. The NC Justice Center and Disability Rights NC helped, Knisley said. (NC Policy Watch is a project of the NC Justice Center.)

“The state has done, I think, a very good job at standing up a supported housing system in TCL (Transitions to Community Living), and I hope they can use this model for all people with disabilities,” she said.  



originally published at http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ncpolicywatch.com%2F2021%2F06%2F10%2Fnc-failed-to-meet-court-ordered-deadlines-for-moving-people-with-mental-illnesses-out-of-adult-care-homes-but-it-got-another-extension%2F by Lynn Bonner

The post NC failed to meet court-ordered deadlines for moving people with mental illnesses out of adult care homes. But it got another extension. first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" } ["summary"]=> string(1662) "
NC failed to meet court-ordered deadlines for moving people with mental illnesses out of adult care homes. But it got another extension.

Image: Adobe Stock Service gaps, lack of central control over regional offices, COVID-19 pandemic contribute to “mission drift” North Carolina had eight years under a 2012 court order to move 2,000 people with mental illnesses out of adult care homes and into houses or apartments. A few years ago, the state received an extension to […]

The post NC failed to meet court-ordered deadlines for moving people with mental illnesses out of adult care homes. But it got another extension. first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["atom_content"]=> string(18010) "
NC failed to meet court-ordered deadlines for moving people with mental illnesses out of adult care homes. But it got another extension.

Image: Adobe Stock

Service gaps, lack of central control over regional offices, COVID-19 pandemic contribute to “mission drift”

North Carolina had eight years under a 2012 court order to move 2,000 people with mental illnesses out of adult care homes and into houses or apartments. A few years ago, the state received an extension to this July. It won’t make that deadline, either.

The U.S. Department of Justice and North Carolina negotiated the original court order after a federal investigation found that the state was using adult care homes to warehouse people with severe mental illnesses in violation of the U.S. Supreme Court’s Olmstead decision. Under the Americans with Disabilities Act, people “have the right to receive services in the most integrated settings possible,” the Justice Department said then.  

The court settlement required the state to find and help pay for 3,000 housing units for people with severe mental illnesses and to move 2,000 people from adult care homes into community housing by July 2020.  

The state found ways to get the required number of affordable apartments and houses, but missed other major targets. It has not reached the goal of moving people from adult care homes, which was central to the court agreement. It continues to fall short of providing community mental health services that would help people leaving those homes to successfully live on their own, and in supporting people with severe mental illnesses who want jobs.  

The agreement has been modified four times since 2012. A federal court judge signed the latest change in March. It gives the states another two years, until July 1, 2023, to reach the housing goal. In the next two years, the state must help another 840 people leave adult care homes. It must also continue to work to keep people from going into adult care homes in the first place, and help people leaving psychiatric hospitals find housing.  

People who were diverted from adult care home placements are occupying most of the nearly 3,000 housing slots.  

Corye Dunn, Disability Rights NC

Corye Dunn, director of public policy at Disability Rights NC, said the results of the community housing effort are an example of “mission drift,” evidence that the state Department of Health and Human Services does not have enough control over the regional mental health offices that oversee county community services. Those regional mental health offices are called Local Management Entities/Managed Care Organizations.  

The state contracts with the LMEs, which receive federal, state, and local money. LMEs pay the mental health providers who work with residents.  

“With the lack of centralized authority, sometimes ineffective practices go relatively unchecked,” Dunn said. “If they’re not cultivating providers, ensuring fidelity to an evidence-based model, and if you’re not ensuring adequate training and adequate payment to retain them in those services, you’re going to get those patchy, inconsistent results.” 

The state needs to focus on building a network of mental health service providers, Dunn said.  

“That’s going to take active management. It’s not going to happen just organically,” she said. “We can’t pretend that our network as it exists is adequate. It’s not.” 

Martha Knisley is an independent reviewer who monitors the state’s progress toward the goals set out in the court order and files reports each year. Those reports are based on document reviews and interviews with dozens of people: current and former residents of adult care homes, as well as people in psychiatric hospitals, service providers, staff from regional mental health offices, and state staff.  

The most recent report is for fiscal year 2020, which ended in June 2020, but focuses on information and trends from the last six months of 2020.  

In the report, Knisley applauded the state for finding ways to increase housing available for people with mental illnesses and for likely reaching the 3,000-unit goal by July 1. But North Carolina has fallen “far short” of meeting goals for moving people out of adult care homes and for “providing access to the array, frequency, and intensity of individualized recovery-based services and supports necessary to enable individuals to transition to and live in community-based settings.” 

She also noted in the latest review that the state hadn’t made progress in transitioning people out of nursing homes over the previous year, and had actually slipped a little. 

Sam Hedrick, senior advisor for the ADA and the Olmstead Act

Sam Hedrick, senior advisor for the ADA and the Olmstead Act at the state Department of Health and Human Services, had a brighter assessment. There is room for improvement, she said, but the state is closer to meeting the 2,000-person goal than it was when Knisley finished her latest review.  

By the end of March, 1,630 people who had been living in nursing home were in supported housing, Hedrick said. Considering that people who are moving are older and many have complex physical needs, the LMEs are doing well, she said.  

The regional agencies are working to make sure that older people with mental illnesses leaving adult care homes have primary care providers and any necessary home health or personal care services in place when they move out, she said. 

COVID-19 slowed some of the effort because workers couldn’t get into adult care homes to talk to people, Hedrick said. They made some modifications using technology or by meeting with people outside. The work is getting back on track, she said, and the state will definitely meet the settlement goals by 2023.  

“We have spent a lot of time laser-focused on adult care homes as a priority population,” Hedrick said. “We had a really good plan. Unfortunately, COVID took the wind out of our sails last year.” 

People in adult care homes say follow-up is lacking

As part of their work, Knisley and her team go into adult care homes to interview people living there. Knisley told Policy Watch this week that “gaps in time” are a problem.

If people are presented with the idea that they can move out of an adult care home, but there’s no timely follow-up, reluctance can set in, Knisley said. “People would express their interest in housing and employment, and it didn’t happen.” 

One person living in an adult care home said that community living is “a hoax,” because someone talked to her about moving but she never got the chance to leave, Knisley said. 

Some who moved into community housing said they did not get timely connections to mental health workers.  

There were “gaps in providers not meeting with people early on,” Knisley said. If there’s no relationship between the provider and the individual, “services break down and were not effective,” she said.  

Few people who they wanted to work actually received help preparing for or finding jobs, the review found.  

Some were told that they would lose their benefits if they got jobs, but were not offered counseling to determine how much they could earn and keep their benefits. Others were told that, for various reasons, they weren’t ready to work.  

Sometimes it’s hard for guardians or counselors to believe that people with severe mental illnesses can work, Knisley said in the interview. “It’s our hesitance about people going to work that sometimes gets in the way,” she said.  

One woman wanted to learn to use a laptop so she could search for part-time work and connect with people, Knisley said. One man wanted to get his high school diploma. Another started a business.  

Hedrick said COVID stopped the plan to improve supported employment, but it’s picking up speed again. “We’re going to see some improvement this year,” she said.  

In her report, Knisley said state contracts with the LMEs don’t clearly detail the obligations the regional offices have under the court settlement.  

“The State has failed to spell out obligations clearly for specific requirements in contracts and to monitor the effectiveness of their guidance and requirements over time,” she wrote. “This has led to the State’s failure to meet the services obligations in this Agreement.” 

In an interview, Knisley said the state is moving in the right direction. Next year, as part of the move to managed care for state Medicaid, people who have severe mental illnesses or developmental disabilities can enroll in what the state calls “tailored plans,” or souped-up health plans that will include both mental and physical health care. With the first contracts, only existing LME/MCOs are allowed to offer tailored plans.  

The state has made the court settlement requirements part of the tailored plan requirements, Knisley said.  

“I do think you’ll see more improvements in services,” she said.  

Hedrick agreed that the move to tailored plans will help. “We can actually set expectations and outcomes we want to see,” she said.  

Dunn of Disability Rights NC, however, anticipates even more problems will arise when regional mental health organizations add physical heath to their responsibilities.  

The regional mental health agencies haven’t been able to meet the court settlement requirements, work that required a lot of coordination. It’s hard to imagine things will get better when they are in charge of coordinating physical health care too, she said.  

“I hope it will improve with the move to Medicaid managed care,” Dunn said. “It can’t get worse.” 

How did the state get 3,000 affordable houses and apartments for people with mental illnesses?
In the first few years after the state agreed to find 3,000 affordable rental units for people with mental illnesses, it didn’t look like it was going to hit the target.

Eventually, the state developed a plan, and DHHS, the NC Housing Finance Agency, and the LMEs started working together to find new money and use it effectively. The NC Justice Center and Disability Rights NC helped, Knisley said. (NC Policy Watch is a project of the NC Justice Center.)

“The state has done, I think, a very good job at standing up a supported housing system in TCL (Transitions to Community Living), and I hope they can use this model for all people with disabilities,” she said.  



originally published at http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ncpolicywatch.com%2F2021%2F06%2F10%2Fnc-failed-to-meet-court-ordered-deadlines-for-moving-people-with-mental-illnesses-out-of-adult-care-homes-but-it-got-another-extension%2F by Lynn Bonner

The post NC failed to meet court-ordered deadlines for moving people with mental illnesses out of adult care homes. But it got another extension. first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1624289477) } [6]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(84) "Here is today’s weather forecast for June 21, 2021 in Winston-Salem, NC | Weather" ["link"]=> string(109) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/here-is-todays-weather-forecast-for-june-21-2021-in-winston-salem-nc-weather/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Bill Moran" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Mon, 21 Jun 2021 15:06:38 +0000" ["category"]=> string(13) "Winston-Salem" ["guid"]=> string(39) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/?p=8735" ["description"]=> string(1026) "
Here is today's weather forecast for June 21, 2021 in Winston-Salem, NC |  Weather

The Winston Salem area can expect a very hot day. Temperatures are forecast to be a hot day today, with temperatures hitting a high of 93, though it will feel even hotter at 96. The lowest temperature forecast today is 73 degrees. We will see a mixture of sun and clouds. High UV indices are […]

The post Here is today's weather forecast for June 21, 2021 in Winston-Salem, NC | Weather first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(1449) "
Here is today's weather forecast for June 21, 2021 in Winston-Salem, NC |  Weather

The Winston Salem area can expect a very hot day. Temperatures are forecast to be a hot day today, with temperatures hitting a high of 93, though it will feel even hotter at 96. The lowest temperature forecast today is 73 degrees. We will see a mixture of sun and clouds. High UV indices are expected. The sun rays will be intense. If possible, stay in the shade. Wear sunglasses, a hat, and sunscreen when in sunlight. A light breeze should be blowing in the Winston Salem area, with forecast models showing only 20 mph wind conditions from the southwest. This report is automatically generated using weather data provided by TownNews.com. Stay up to date. Visit journalnow.com for local news and weather.

The post Here is today's weather forecast for June 21, 2021 in Winston-Salem, NC | Weather first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" } ["summary"]=> string(1026) "
Here is today's weather forecast for June 21, 2021 in Winston-Salem, NC |  Weather

The Winston Salem area can expect a very hot day. Temperatures are forecast to be a hot day today, with temperatures hitting a high of 93, though it will feel even hotter at 96. The lowest temperature forecast today is 73 degrees. We will see a mixture of sun and clouds. High UV indices are […]

The post Here is today's weather forecast for June 21, 2021 in Winston-Salem, NC | Weather first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["atom_content"]=> string(1449) "
Here is today's weather forecast for June 21, 2021 in Winston-Salem, NC |  Weather

The Winston Salem area can expect a very hot day. Temperatures are forecast to be a hot day today, with temperatures hitting a high of 93, though it will feel even hotter at 96. The lowest temperature forecast today is 73 degrees. We will see a mixture of sun and clouds. High UV indices are expected. The sun rays will be intense. If possible, stay in the shade. Wear sunglasses, a hat, and sunscreen when in sunlight. A light breeze should be blowing in the Winston Salem area, with forecast models showing only 20 mph wind conditions from the southwest. This report is automatically generated using weather data provided by TownNews.com. Stay up to date. Visit journalnow.com for local news and weather.

The post Here is today's weather forecast for June 21, 2021 in Winston-Salem, NC | Weather first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1624287998) } [7]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(63) "1 useless, 1 injured after wreckage on Greensboro Avenue Sunday" ["link"]=> string(95) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/1-useless-1-injured-after-wreckage-on-greensboro-avenue-sunday/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Bill Moran" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Mon, 21 Jun 2021 14:38:05 +0000" ["category"]=> string(10) "Greensboro" ["guid"]=> string(39) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/?p=8731" ["description"]=> string(1572) "
1 dead, 1 injured after wreckage on Greensboro Avenue Sunday

A woman was killed and another was hospitalized in a two-vehicle accident on Greensboro Avenue Sunday night. The crash occurred at 7:25 pm on Greensboro Avenue and 43rd Street, near Academy Sports on Skyland Boulevard. The slain driver was driving south on Greensboro and turning left on 43rd Street as her vehicle drove a limousine […]

The post 1 useless, 1 injured after wreckage on Greensboro Avenue Sunday first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(2133) "
1 dead, 1 injured after wreckage on Greensboro Avenue Sunday

A woman was killed and another was hospitalized in a two-vehicle accident on Greensboro Avenue Sunday night.

The crash occurred at 7:25 pm on Greensboro Avenue and 43rd Street, near Academy Sports on Skyland Boulevard.

The slain driver was driving south on Greensboro and turning left on 43rd Street as her vehicle drove a limousine north on Greensboro.

The woman in the SUV, who was in her late 40s, was pronounced dead at the scene. Her name has not yet been published.

Paramedics from the Tuscaloosa Fire and Rescue Service freed the 26-year-old victim from the limousine before an ambulance took him to the DCH Regional Medical Center. Her injuries are severe but do not appear to be life threatening.

Members of the Tuscaloosa Police Accident Reconstruction Department are conducting a follow-up investigation to determine the circumstances of the crash.

The post 1 useless, 1 injured after wreckage on Greensboro Avenue Sunday first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" } ["summary"]=> string(1572) "
1 dead, 1 injured after wreckage on Greensboro Avenue Sunday

A woman was killed and another was hospitalized in a two-vehicle accident on Greensboro Avenue Sunday night. The crash occurred at 7:25 pm on Greensboro Avenue and 43rd Street, near Academy Sports on Skyland Boulevard. The slain driver was driving south on Greensboro and turning left on 43rd Street as her vehicle drove a limousine […]

The post 1 useless, 1 injured after wreckage on Greensboro Avenue Sunday first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["atom_content"]=> string(2133) "
1 dead, 1 injured after wreckage on Greensboro Avenue Sunday

A woman was killed and another was hospitalized in a two-vehicle accident on Greensboro Avenue Sunday night.

The crash occurred at 7:25 pm on Greensboro Avenue and 43rd Street, near Academy Sports on Skyland Boulevard.

The slain driver was driving south on Greensboro and turning left on 43rd Street as her vehicle drove a limousine north on Greensboro.

The woman in the SUV, who was in her late 40s, was pronounced dead at the scene. Her name has not yet been published.

Paramedics from the Tuscaloosa Fire and Rescue Service freed the 26-year-old victim from the limousine before an ambulance took him to the DCH Regional Medical Center. Her injuries are severe but do not appear to be life threatening.

Members of the Tuscaloosa Police Accident Reconstruction Department are conducting a follow-up investigation to determine the circumstances of the crash.

The post 1 useless, 1 injured after wreckage on Greensboro Avenue Sunday first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1624286285) } [8]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(106) "Monday numbers: New study on death penalty shows it’s expensive, racially disproportionate and unpopular" ["link"]=> string(134) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/monday-numbers-new-study-on-death-penalty-shows-its-expensive-racially-disproportionate-and-unpopular/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Bill Moran" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Mon, 21 Jun 2021 12:29:21 +0000" ["category"]=> string(4) "News" ["guid"]=> string(39) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/?p=8729" ["description"]=> string(1117) "
Monday numbers: Mapping urban heat islands to blunt the health risks of climate change

The death penalty is more expensive and no more effective at deterring crimes than alternative punishments such as life imprisonment, according to a report by Appalachian State University professor of government and judicial studies Matthew Robinson. In the report published earlier this month, Robinson examined data to answer the question of whether death penalty should […]

The post Monday numbers: New study on death penalty shows it's expensive, racially disproportionate and unpopular first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(5924) "
Monday numbers: Mapping urban heat islands to blunt the health risks of climate change

The death penalty is more expensive and no more effective at deterring crimes than alternative punishments such as life imprisonment, according to a report by Appalachian State University professor of government and judicial studies Matthew Robinson.

In the report published earlier this month, Robinson examined data to answer the question of whether death penalty should still be maintained as a state policy. North Carolina has not executed a person on death row in nearly 15 years; however, it is still legal. Under state law, an individual can be sentenced to death if they are convicted of first-degree murder and found to meet at least one of 11 aggravating circumstances.

The report highlights the arbitrariness and disparities in the harshest sentence in North Carolina, which has resulted in innocent people dying because of wrongful convictions.

These findings, coupled with a new report from the U.S. DOJ Bureau of Justice Statistics, show that North Carolina, a leading state in the number of people on death row, is facing consequences from maintaining the death penalty system.

Expensive, disproportionate and unpopular

136 — number of people on death row in June 2021

2006 — the last year North Carolina performed an execution 

23.5% — rate of death sentences identified as excessive, in a review of 361 cases that resulted in capital punishment from 1990 to 2010

44% — percentage of respondents in North Carolina favor the death penalty over the alternative of life without parole, according to a 2019 poll

$2 million — extra cost of each execution compared with other sentences

$11 million — cost that the state could have saved each year if it did not maintain death penalty. The state pays out large sums each year for defense cost, payment to jurors, post-conviction cost, resentencing hearings and payment to the prison system.

Racial disparities

54% — percentage of death row prisoners who are Black, whereas the group only comprised 22% of the state’s total population

47.3% — percentage of those convicted of killing white victims who were sentenced to death between 1977 and 2005

40.3% — percentage of those convicted of killing Black victims who were sentenced to death over the same time period

44% — percentage of the 1,272 jury decisions that led to death sentences between 1977 and 2005

45.8% — rate of white defendants to receive a death sentence among between 1977 and 2005

42.4% — rate of Black defendants to be sentenced to death during the same time period

14 times — likelihood of Black people who killed whites to be sentenced to death compared with whites who killed Black people between 1999 and 2006

North Carolina a leading state in death penalty population

 2,570 — number of people on death row in 29 states and the Federal Bureau of Prisons

5th — North Carolina’s in terms of number of people on death row in 2019, after California (724), Florida (340), Texas (216) and Alabama (175)

41% — percentage of Black death row prisoners nationwide

56% — percentage of white death row prisoners nationwide

32 — states and the federal government that still authorize the death penalty in 2019

7 — states carried out death penalty execution in 2019. 

31 — number of people who received a death sentence in 2019 nationwide

3 — number of people who received the death sentence in North Carolina in 2019

Sources: The Death Penalty in North Carolina, 2021: A Summary of the Data and Scientific Studies, U.S. Department of Justice Bureau of Justice Statistics



originally published at http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ncpolicywatch.com%2F2021%2F06%2F21%2Fmonday-numbers-new-study-on-death-penalty-shows-its-expensive-racially-disproportionate-and-unpopular%2F by Yanqi Xu

The post Monday numbers: New study on death penalty shows it's expensive, racially disproportionate and unpopular first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" } ["summary"]=> string(1117) "
Monday numbers: Mapping urban heat islands to blunt the health risks of climate change

The death penalty is more expensive and no more effective at deterring crimes than alternative punishments such as life imprisonment, according to a report by Appalachian State University professor of government and judicial studies Matthew Robinson. In the report published earlier this month, Robinson examined data to answer the question of whether death penalty should […]

The post Monday numbers: New study on death penalty shows it's expensive, racially disproportionate and unpopular first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["atom_content"]=> string(5924) "
Monday numbers: Mapping urban heat islands to blunt the health risks of climate change

The death penalty is more expensive and no more effective at deterring crimes than alternative punishments such as life imprisonment, according to a report by Appalachian State University professor of government and judicial studies Matthew Robinson.

In the report published earlier this month, Robinson examined data to answer the question of whether death penalty should still be maintained as a state policy. North Carolina has not executed a person on death row in nearly 15 years; however, it is still legal. Under state law, an individual can be sentenced to death if they are convicted of first-degree murder and found to meet at least one of 11 aggravating circumstances.

The report highlights the arbitrariness and disparities in the harshest sentence in North Carolina, which has resulted in innocent people dying because of wrongful convictions.

These findings, coupled with a new report from the U.S. DOJ Bureau of Justice Statistics, show that North Carolina, a leading state in the number of people on death row, is facing consequences from maintaining the death penalty system.

Expensive, disproportionate and unpopular

136 — number of people on death row in June 2021

2006 — the last year North Carolina performed an execution 

23.5% — rate of death sentences identified as excessive, in a review of 361 cases that resulted in capital punishment from 1990 to 2010

44% — percentage of respondents in North Carolina favor the death penalty over the alternative of life without parole, according to a 2019 poll

$2 million — extra cost of each execution compared with other sentences

$11 million — cost that the state could have saved each year if it did not maintain death penalty. The state pays out large sums each year for defense cost, payment to jurors, post-conviction cost, resentencing hearings and payment to the prison system.

Racial disparities

54% — percentage of death row prisoners who are Black, whereas the group only comprised 22% of the state’s total population

47.3% — percentage of those convicted of killing white victims who were sentenced to death between 1977 and 2005

40.3% — percentage of those convicted of killing Black victims who were sentenced to death over the same time period

44% — percentage of the 1,272 jury decisions that led to death sentences between 1977 and 2005

45.8% — rate of white defendants to receive a death sentence among between 1977 and 2005

42.4% — rate of Black defendants to be sentenced to death during the same time period

14 times — likelihood of Black people who killed whites to be sentenced to death compared with whites who killed Black people between 1999 and 2006

North Carolina a leading state in death penalty population

 2,570 — number of people on death row in 29 states and the Federal Bureau of Prisons

5th — North Carolina’s in terms of number of people on death row in 2019, after California (724), Florida (340), Texas (216) and Alabama (175)

41% — percentage of Black death row prisoners nationwide

56% — percentage of white death row prisoners nationwide

32 — states and the federal government that still authorize the death penalty in 2019

7 — states carried out death penalty execution in 2019. 

31 — number of people who received a death sentence in 2019 nationwide

3 — number of people who received the death sentence in North Carolina in 2019

Sources: The Death Penalty in North Carolina, 2021: A Summary of the Data and Scientific Studies, U.S. Department of Justice Bureau of Justice Statistics



originally published at http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ncpolicywatch.com%2F2021%2F06%2F21%2Fmonday-numbers-new-study-on-death-penalty-shows-its-expensive-racially-disproportionate-and-unpopular%2F by Yanqi Xu

The post Monday numbers: New study on death penalty shows it's expensive, racially disproportionate and unpopular first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1624278561) } [9]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(94) "The historic magnolia house in Greensboro is slated to open as a bed and breakfast in the fall" ["link"]=> string(129) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/the-historic-magnolia-house-in-greensboro-is-slated-to-open-as-a-bed-and-breakfast-in-the-fall-2/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Bill Moran" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Mon, 21 Jun 2021 10:36:10 +0000" ["category"]=> string(10) "Greensboro" ["guid"]=> string(39) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/?p=8727" ["description"]=> string(1409) "
The historic magnolia house in Greensboro is slated to open as a bed and breakfast in the fall

GREENSBORO, NC (WGHP) – Ever wanted to stay in a piece of history for a night? In the fall, you may have the option to make a reservation to stay at the Historic Magnolia House in Greensboro. In the 1950s, Magnolia House was home to African Americans and some of the most famous people to […]

The post The historic magnolia house in Greensboro is slated to open as a bed and breakfast in the fall first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(2190) "
The historic magnolia house in Greensboro is slated to open as a bed and breakfast in the fall

GREENSBORO, NC (WGHP) – Ever wanted to stay in a piece of history for a night?

In the fall, you may have the option to make a reservation to stay at the Historic Magnolia House in Greensboro.

In the 1950s, Magnolia House was home to African Americans and some of the most famous people to have come through the Triad.

In the 1940s and 1950s, the house appeared in the Green Book, a guide for African Americans to staying safely overnight while traveling.

The Magnolia House will soon have four hotel rooms based on icons who have stayed in the houses’ rooms, such as Ike and Tina Turner, Ray Charles and James Brown, and more.

The newly renovated hotel rooms will also have a concierge lounge on the second floor.

There is also a virtual reality tour created with the UNCG’s Department of Interior Architecture for Creative Greensboro’s Catalyzing Creativity Fellowship.

As visitors experience the VR tour, they are stepped back in time to see what the interior of Magnolia House looked like in the 1950s.

The post The historic magnolia house in Greensboro is slated to open as a bed and breakfast in the fall first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" } ["summary"]=> string(1409) "
The historic magnolia house in Greensboro is slated to open as a bed and breakfast in the fall

GREENSBORO, NC (WGHP) – Ever wanted to stay in a piece of history for a night? In the fall, you may have the option to make a reservation to stay at the Historic Magnolia House in Greensboro. In the 1950s, Magnolia House was home to African Americans and some of the most famous people to […]

The post The historic magnolia house in Greensboro is slated to open as a bed and breakfast in the fall first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["atom_content"]=> string(2190) "
The historic magnolia house in Greensboro is slated to open as a bed and breakfast in the fall

GREENSBORO, NC (WGHP) – Ever wanted to stay in a piece of history for a night?

In the fall, you may have the option to make a reservation to stay at the Historic Magnolia House in Greensboro.

In the 1950s, Magnolia House was home to African Americans and some of the most famous people to have come through the Triad.

In the 1940s and 1950s, the house appeared in the Green Book, a guide for African Americans to staying safely overnight while traveling.

The Magnolia House will soon have four hotel rooms based on icons who have stayed in the houses’ rooms, such as Ike and Tina Turner, Ray Charles and James Brown, and more.

The newly renovated hotel rooms will also have a concierge lounge on the second floor.

There is also a virtual reality tour created with the UNCG’s Department of Interior Architecture for Creative Greensboro’s Catalyzing Creativity Fellowship.

As visitors experience the VR tour, they are stepped back in time to see what the interior of Magnolia House looked like in the 1950s.

The post The historic magnolia house in Greensboro is slated to open as a bed and breakfast in the fall first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

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