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4 deaths, 100 cases reported Monday

Minnesota added four new COVID-19 deaths and 100 new cases in the Minnesota Department of Health’s report on Monday. These include five new cases in the St. Cloud counties that have had no new deaths. The deaths included a Martin County resident in their late 50s, a Hennepin County resident in their early 60s, a […]

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4 deaths, 100 cases reported Monday

Minnesota added four new COVID-19 deaths and 100 new cases in the Minnesota Department of Health’s report on Monday.

These include five new cases in the St. Cloud counties that have had no new deaths.

The deaths included a Martin County resident in their late 50s, a Hennepin County resident in their early 60s, a Scott County resident in their late 60s, and a Beltrami County resident in their late 70s, the daily report said.

The daily COVID-19 death rate in Minnesota has remained in the single digits for 10 days.

Benton County didn’t add a single COVID-19 case to Monday’s report or Sunday’s report. Stearns County added two cases and Sherburne County added three on Monday.

Here are the latest case and death numbers in the tri-border region:

As of Monday, Minnesota has reported 604,608 known cases of COVID-19 and 7,549 related deaths, according to MDH.

32,532 people have been hospitalized in the state since the pandemic began.

CONNECTED: Six new COVID cases in the St. Cloud area, five deaths reported in Minnesota

In Minnesota, 2.8 million people have completed their vaccine series and about 200,000 more have received a dose of the vaccine, according to the state’s vaccine dashboard.

People aged 12 and over are entitled to the vaccine. And 64% of eligible people across the state have at least started the vaccine. In Stearns County, 50% of eligible individuals have at least started the vaccine, along with 44% in Benton County and 47% in Sherburne County.

In Olmstead County, home of the Mayo Clinic, 78% of the eligible population have at least started the vaccine. In Hennepin County, home of Minneapolis, 75% of eligible people have at least started the vaccine. And in sparsely populated Cook County, 81% of eligible people have at least started vaccinating.

There are nearly 179 million cases of COVID-19 worldwide, including more than 33.5 million in the United States, according to the Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Research Center. Almost 3.9 million people have died from the infection worldwide, including nearly 602,000 people in the United States

Support local journalism. Subscribe to sctimes.com today.

The post 4 deaths, 100 cases reported Monday first appeared on Minnesota Minutes." } ["feedburner"]=> array(1) { ["origlink"]=> string(64) "https://minnesotaminutes.com/4-deaths-100-cases-reported-monday/" } ["summary"]=> string(1194) "
4 deaths, 100 cases reported Monday

Minnesota added four new COVID-19 deaths and 100 new cases in the Minnesota Department of Health’s report on Monday. These include five new cases in the St. Cloud counties that have had no new deaths. The deaths included a Martin County resident in their late 50s, a Hennepin County resident in their early 60s, a […]

The post 4 deaths, 100 cases reported Monday first appeared on Minnesota Minutes." ["atom_content"]=> string(3683) "
4 deaths, 100 cases reported Monday

Minnesota added four new COVID-19 deaths and 100 new cases in the Minnesota Department of Health’s report on Monday.

These include five new cases in the St. Cloud counties that have had no new deaths.

The deaths included a Martin County resident in their late 50s, a Hennepin County resident in their early 60s, a Scott County resident in their late 60s, and a Beltrami County resident in their late 70s, the daily report said.

The daily COVID-19 death rate in Minnesota has remained in the single digits for 10 days.

Benton County didn’t add a single COVID-19 case to Monday’s report or Sunday’s report. Stearns County added two cases and Sherburne County added three on Monday.

Here are the latest case and death numbers in the tri-border region:

As of Monday, Minnesota has reported 604,608 known cases of COVID-19 and 7,549 related deaths, according to MDH.

32,532 people have been hospitalized in the state since the pandemic began.

CONNECTED: Six new COVID cases in the St. Cloud area, five deaths reported in Minnesota

In Minnesota, 2.8 million people have completed their vaccine series and about 200,000 more have received a dose of the vaccine, according to the state’s vaccine dashboard.

People aged 12 and over are entitled to the vaccine. And 64% of eligible people across the state have at least started the vaccine. In Stearns County, 50% of eligible individuals have at least started the vaccine, along with 44% in Benton County and 47% in Sherburne County.

In Olmstead County, home of the Mayo Clinic, 78% of the eligible population have at least started the vaccine. In Hennepin County, home of Minneapolis, 75% of eligible people have at least started the vaccine. And in sparsely populated Cook County, 81% of eligible people have at least started vaccinating.

There are nearly 179 million cases of COVID-19 worldwide, including more than 33.5 million in the United States, according to the Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Research Center. Almost 3.9 million people have died from the infection worldwide, including nearly 602,000 people in the United States

Support local journalism. Subscribe to sctimes.com today.

The post 4 deaths, 100 cases reported Monday first appeared on Minnesota Minutes." ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1624304964) } [1]=> array(12) { ["title"]=> string(60) "These Are The Top Private High Schools In Minnesota For 2021" ["link"]=> string(65) "http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/minnesotanewsdaily/~3/LTfIzovCbfM/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(15) "Dexter Peterson" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Mon, 21 Jun 2021 18:18:37 +0000" ["category"]=> string(20) "Minneapolis-St. Paul" ["guid"]=> string(36) "https://minnesotaminutes.com/?p=6617" ["description"]=> string(1446) "
Patch News

TWIN CITIES, MN – In addition to its rugged public schools, Minneapolis-St. The Paul Metropolitan Area is home to one of the most competitive private school markets in the country. At the top of the list of private schools in Minnesota is Mounds Park Academy, according to Niche.com’s Best Private Schools 2021 Ranking. Niche’s rankings […]

The post These Are The Top Private High Schools In Minnesota For 2021 first appeared on Minnesota Minutes." ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(2842) "
Patch News

TWIN CITIES, MN – In addition to its rugged public schools, Minneapolis-St. The Paul Metropolitan Area is home to one of the most competitive private school markets in the country.

At the top of the list of private schools in Minnesota is Mounds Park Academy, according to Niche.com’s Best Private Schools 2021 Ranking. Niche’s rankings are based on SAT and ACT scores, the quality of colleges chosen by students, student-teacher ratios, and parental ratings.

Check out Niche’s 25 Best Private High Schools in Minnesota:

  1. Mounds Park Academy (St. Paul)
  2. The Minnesota International School (Eden Prarie)
  3. The Blake School (Hopkins)
  4. St. Paul Academy & Summit School (St. Paul)
  5. Breck School (Minneapolis)
  6. Saint John’s Preparatory School (Collegeville)
  7. Minnehaha Academy (Minneapolis)
  8. Providence Academy (Plymouth)
  9. Shattuck-St. Marienschule (Faribault)
  10. St. Thomas Academy (Mendota Heights)
  11. Visiting School (Mendota Heights)
  12. Trinity School in River Ridge (Eagan)
  13. Academy of Holy Angels (Richfield)
  14. DeLaSalle High School (Minneapolis)
  15. Benilde-St. Margaret’s School (St. Louis Park)
  16. Marshall School (Duluth)
  17. Cretin Derham Hall (St. Paul)
  18. Christian Academy of Maranatha (Brooklyn Park)
  19. Lourdes High School (Rochester)
  20. Catholic High School of the Holy Family (Victoria)
  21. Lutheran Academy of St. Croix (West St. Paul)
  22. Cotter Schools (Winona)
  23. Concordia Academy (Roseville)
  24. Southwest Christian High School (Chaska)
  25. New Life Academy (Woodbury)

See the full list here.

The post These Are The Top Private High Schools In Minnesota For 2021 first appeared on Minnesota Minutes." } ["feedburner"]=> array(1) { ["origlink"]=> string(90) "https://minnesotaminutes.com/these-are-the-top-private-high-schools-in-minnesota-for-2021/" } ["summary"]=> string(1446) "
Patch News

TWIN CITIES, MN – In addition to its rugged public schools, Minneapolis-St. The Paul Metropolitan Area is home to one of the most competitive private school markets in the country. At the top of the list of private schools in Minnesota is Mounds Park Academy, according to Niche.com’s Best Private Schools 2021 Ranking. Niche’s rankings […]

The post These Are The Top Private High Schools In Minnesota For 2021 first appeared on Minnesota Minutes." ["atom_content"]=> string(2842) "
Patch News

TWIN CITIES, MN – In addition to its rugged public schools, Minneapolis-St. The Paul Metropolitan Area is home to one of the most competitive private school markets in the country.

At the top of the list of private schools in Minnesota is Mounds Park Academy, according to Niche.com’s Best Private Schools 2021 Ranking. Niche’s rankings are based on SAT and ACT scores, the quality of colleges chosen by students, student-teacher ratios, and parental ratings.

Check out Niche’s 25 Best Private High Schools in Minnesota:

  1. Mounds Park Academy (St. Paul)
  2. The Minnesota International School (Eden Prarie)
  3. The Blake School (Hopkins)
  4. St. Paul Academy & Summit School (St. Paul)
  5. Breck School (Minneapolis)
  6. Saint John’s Preparatory School (Collegeville)
  7. Minnehaha Academy (Minneapolis)
  8. Providence Academy (Plymouth)
  9. Shattuck-St. Marienschule (Faribault)
  10. St. Thomas Academy (Mendota Heights)
  11. Visiting School (Mendota Heights)
  12. Trinity School in River Ridge (Eagan)
  13. Academy of Holy Angels (Richfield)
  14. DeLaSalle High School (Minneapolis)
  15. Benilde-St. Margaret’s School (St. Louis Park)
  16. Marshall School (Duluth)
  17. Cretin Derham Hall (St. Paul)
  18. Christian Academy of Maranatha (Brooklyn Park)
  19. Lourdes High School (Rochester)
  20. Catholic High School of the Holy Family (Victoria)
  21. Lutheran Academy of St. Croix (West St. Paul)
  22. Cotter Schools (Winona)
  23. Concordia Academy (Roseville)
  24. Southwest Christian High School (Chaska)
  25. New Life Academy (Woodbury)

See the full list here.

The post These Are The Top Private High Schools In Minnesota For 2021 first appeared on Minnesota Minutes." ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1624299517) } [2]=> array(12) { ["title"]=> string(81) "Former Canadian defense attorney Tom Kurvers dies of lung cancer at the age of 58" ["link"]=> string(65) "http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/minnesotanewsdaily/~3/EX4x1c-VbUQ/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(15) "Dexter Peterson" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Mon, 21 Jun 2021 17:48:07 +0000" ["category"]=> string(6) "Duluth" ["guid"]=> string(36) "https://minnesotaminutes.com/?p=6614" ["description"]=> string(1618) "
Former Canadian defense attorney Tom Kurvers dies of lung cancer at the age of 58

Links to the breadcrumb trail Sports NHL Montreal Canada Ice hockey from the inside out ice Hockey He won the Hobey Baker Award for Best Player in US College before joining the Habs and joining the Stanley Cup team in 1986. Author of the article: Stu Cowan • Montreal Gazette Defenseman Tom Kurvers was part […]

The post Former Canadian defense attorney Tom Kurvers dies of lung cancer at the age of 58 first appeared on Minnesota Minutes." ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(10623) "
Former Canadian defense attorney Tom Kurvers dies of lung cancer at the age of 58

Links to the breadcrumb trail

He won the Hobey Baker Award for Best Player in US College before joining the Habs and joining the Stanley Cup team in 1986.

Author of the article:

Stu Cowan Montreal Gazette Defenseman Tom Kurvers was part of the Canadiens' Stanley Cup team in 1986 before joining the Buffalo Sabers the next season.Defenseman Tom Kurvers was part of the Canadiens’ Stanley Cup team in 1986 before joining the Buffalo Sabers the next season. Montreal Gazette files

Article content

Former Canadian defender Tom Kurvers has died at the age of 58.

The University of Minnesota-Duluth announced on Monday. Kurvers was diagnosed with lung cancer in 2019.

Born in Minneapolis, he played four seasons at the University of Minnesota-Duluth and won the Hobey Baker Award for best player in US college hockey after scoring 18-58-76 in 43 games in the 1983-84 season. The next season he joined the Canadiens, who selected him in the seventh round (145th overall) of the 1981 NHL Draft.

Kurvers was part of the Canadiens team that won the 1986 Stanley Cup.

My timing in hockey was up large,“Kurvers told the late Ian MacDonald in a Montreal Gazette Where Are They Now feature in 2011.” I was lucky enough to be drafted from Montreal and we won a championship.

“I can still look back on that time and see how, if things are done right, you have a chance win, ”added Kurvers. “If they’re not done right, you have no chance of being successful in the NHL. “

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Article content

Kurvers played 62 regular season games with the Canadiens in 1985-86 and scored 7-23-30 totals but did not play in any playoff game. After playing just one game the next season, Kurvers refused to report to the Canadiens AHL farm team in Sherbrooke, and on November 18, 1986 he was traded to the Buffalo Sabers in exchange for a second-round draft pick, the left winger Martin St. Amour, who would only play one game in the NHL with the Ottawa Senators, was used for selection.

“There are a few disappointment, Naturally, because I’ve made so many friends here, ”said Kurvers after the deal. “But I can’t go with anyone bitterness . . . not the way I was treated (General Manager Serge Savard). He was Fair with me since joining the team, and no one could have treated me more fair than him since that event.

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Article content

Kurvers ended up playing 659 regular season games in the NHL with the Canadiens, Sabers, New Jersey Devils, Toronto Maple Leafs, Vancouver Canucks, New York Islanders and Anaheim Ducks.

A sad day for Bulldog Hockey as we lost one of the all-time greats, not just as a player, but as a person. TK was the epitome of a class act. You will miss TK very much. @ Duluth, Minnesota https://t.co/24plRO5j6b

– UMD men’s hockey (@UMDMensHockey) June 21, 2021

advertising

This ad hasn’t loaded yet, but your article continues below.

Article content

After his playing career ended in 1995, Kurvers moved as an assistant coach to the Phoenix Coyotes under former Canadiens teammate Bobby Smith, who was the team’s GM. After a season behind the bank, Kurvers switched to a scouting role and became director of the Coyotes’ player staff in 2005. Kurvers joined Tampa Bay Lightning in 2008 as Assistant GM before joining the Minnesota Wild in 2018, serving three seasons as Assistant GM for the Wild.

We apologize, but this video could not be loaded.

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Article content

When you are a young player, you don’t interact with the ownership and you don’t interact with the team president.“Kurvers said MacDonald in 2011.” But you are part of a team that will become your new family, and you react and interact with the coaching staff. It was all very high-quality with the Canadiens. (Bob) Gainey was the captain, and that’s all you could ask for.

“I got the chance to play with Larry Robinson,” added Kurvers. “These are the people in the game who inspire respect and have earned that respect. If you don’t learn to play with guys like that, you are missing out on the boat. It was an incredible experience to be part of this team in this city. It’s like the New York Yankees. It’s like the Dallas Cowboys. It’s a big time. It was then and it is now.

Kurvers earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in communications from the University of Minnesota-Duluth and began post-graduate degrees in the 1991 off-season before earning an MBA in sports management from the University of St. Thomas in 1997.

He leaves behind his wife, Heather, and their four children: daughters Madison and Rose and sons Weston and Roman.

scowan@postmedia.com

twitter.com/StuCowan1

Share this article on your social network

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Subscribe to receive daily headlines from the Montreal Gazette, a division of Postmedia Network Inc.

By clicking the registration button, you agree to receive the above-mentioned newsletter from Postmedia Network Inc. You can unsubscribe at any time by clicking the unsubscribe link at the bottom of our emails. Postmedia Network Inc. | 365 Bloor Street East, Toronto, Ontario, M4W 3L4 | 416-383-2300

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A welcome email is on the way. If you don’t see it, please check your Junk folder.

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Remarks

Postmedia advocates a lively but civil discussion forum and encourages all readers to share their thoughts on our articles. It can take up to an hour for comments to be moderated before they appear on the site. We ask that you keep your comments relevant and respectful. We turned email notifications on – you will now receive an email when you’ve received a reply to your comment, there’s an update on a comment thread you’re following, or when a user you follow follows comments . Check out our Community Guidelines for more information and details on how to customize your email settings.

The post Former Canadian defense attorney Tom Kurvers dies of lung cancer at the age of 58 first appeared on Minnesota Minutes." } ["feedburner"]=> array(1) { ["origlink"]=> string(111) "https://minnesotaminutes.com/former-canadian-defense-attorney-tom-kurvers-dies-of-lung-cancer-at-the-age-of-58/" } ["summary"]=> string(1618) "
Former Canadian defense attorney Tom Kurvers dies of lung cancer at the age of 58

Links to the breadcrumb trail Sports NHL Montreal Canada Ice hockey from the inside out ice Hockey He won the Hobey Baker Award for Best Player in US College before joining the Habs and joining the Stanley Cup team in 1986. Author of the article: Stu Cowan • Montreal Gazette Defenseman Tom Kurvers was part […]

The post Former Canadian defense attorney Tom Kurvers dies of lung cancer at the age of 58 first appeared on Minnesota Minutes." ["atom_content"]=> string(10623) "
Former Canadian defense attorney Tom Kurvers dies of lung cancer at the age of 58

Links to the breadcrumb trail

He won the Hobey Baker Award for Best Player in US College before joining the Habs and joining the Stanley Cup team in 1986.

Author of the article:

Stu Cowan Montreal Gazette Defenseman Tom Kurvers was part of the Canadiens' Stanley Cup team in 1986 before joining the Buffalo Sabers the next season.Defenseman Tom Kurvers was part of the Canadiens’ Stanley Cup team in 1986 before joining the Buffalo Sabers the next season. Montreal Gazette files

Article content

Former Canadian defender Tom Kurvers has died at the age of 58.

The University of Minnesota-Duluth announced on Monday. Kurvers was diagnosed with lung cancer in 2019.

Born in Minneapolis, he played four seasons at the University of Minnesota-Duluth and won the Hobey Baker Award for best player in US college hockey after scoring 18-58-76 in 43 games in the 1983-84 season. The next season he joined the Canadiens, who selected him in the seventh round (145th overall) of the 1981 NHL Draft.

Kurvers was part of the Canadiens team that won the 1986 Stanley Cup.

My timing in hockey was up large,“Kurvers told the late Ian MacDonald in a Montreal Gazette Where Are They Now feature in 2011.” I was lucky enough to be drafted from Montreal and we won a championship.

“I can still look back on that time and see how, if things are done right, you have a chance win, ”added Kurvers. “If they’re not done right, you have no chance of being successful in the NHL. “

advertising

This ad hasn’t loaded yet, but your article continues below.

Article content

Kurvers played 62 regular season games with the Canadiens in 1985-86 and scored 7-23-30 totals but did not play in any playoff game. After playing just one game the next season, Kurvers refused to report to the Canadiens AHL farm team in Sherbrooke, and on November 18, 1986 he was traded to the Buffalo Sabers in exchange for a second-round draft pick, the left winger Martin St. Amour, who would only play one game in the NHL with the Ottawa Senators, was used for selection.

“There are a few disappointment, Naturally, because I’ve made so many friends here, ”said Kurvers after the deal. “But I can’t go with anyone bitterness . . . not the way I was treated (General Manager Serge Savard). He was Fair with me since joining the team, and no one could have treated me more fair than him since that event.

advertising

This ad hasn’t loaded yet, but your article continues below.

Article content

Kurvers ended up playing 659 regular season games in the NHL with the Canadiens, Sabers, New Jersey Devils, Toronto Maple Leafs, Vancouver Canucks, New York Islanders and Anaheim Ducks.

A sad day for Bulldog Hockey as we lost one of the all-time greats, not just as a player, but as a person. TK was the epitome of a class act. You will miss TK very much. @ Duluth, Minnesota https://t.co/24plRO5j6b

– UMD men’s hockey (@UMDMensHockey) June 21, 2021

advertising

This ad hasn’t loaded yet, but your article continues below.

Article content

After his playing career ended in 1995, Kurvers moved as an assistant coach to the Phoenix Coyotes under former Canadiens teammate Bobby Smith, who was the team’s GM. After a season behind the bank, Kurvers switched to a scouting role and became director of the Coyotes’ player staff in 2005. Kurvers joined Tampa Bay Lightning in 2008 as Assistant GM before joining the Minnesota Wild in 2018, serving three seasons as Assistant GM for the Wild.

We apologize, but this video could not be loaded.

advertising

This ad hasn’t loaded yet, but your article continues below.

Article content

When you are a young player, you don’t interact with the ownership and you don’t interact with the team president.“Kurvers said MacDonald in 2011.” But you are part of a team that will become your new family, and you react and interact with the coaching staff. It was all very high-quality with the Canadiens. (Bob) Gainey was the captain, and that’s all you could ask for.

“I got the chance to play with Larry Robinson,” added Kurvers. “These are the people in the game who inspire respect and have earned that respect. If you don’t learn to play with guys like that, you are missing out on the boat. It was an incredible experience to be part of this team in this city. It’s like the New York Yankees. It’s like the Dallas Cowboys. It’s a big time. It was then and it is now.

Kurvers earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in communications from the University of Minnesota-Duluth and began post-graduate degrees in the 1991 off-season before earning an MBA in sports management from the University of St. Thomas in 1997.

He leaves behind his wife, Heather, and their four children: daughters Madison and Rose and sons Weston and Roman.

scowan@postmedia.com

twitter.com/StuCowan1

Share this article on your social network

advertising

This ad hasn’t loaded yet, but your article continues below.

Subscribe to receive daily headlines from the Montreal Gazette, a division of Postmedia Network Inc.

By clicking the registration button, you agree to receive the above-mentioned newsletter from Postmedia Network Inc. You can unsubscribe at any time by clicking the unsubscribe link at the bottom of our emails. Postmedia Network Inc. | 365 Bloor Street East, Toronto, Ontario, M4W 3L4 | 416-383-2300

Thanks for registering!

A welcome email is on the way. If you don’t see it, please check your Junk folder.

The next issue of the Montreal Gazette Headline News will be in your inbox soon.

Remarks

Postmedia advocates a lively but civil discussion forum and encourages all readers to share their thoughts on our articles. It can take up to an hour for comments to be moderated before they appear on the site. We ask that you keep your comments relevant and respectful. We turned email notifications on – you will now receive an email when you’ve received a reply to your comment, there’s an update on a comment thread you’re following, or when a user you follow follows comments . Check out our Community Guidelines for more information and details on how to customize your email settings.

The post Former Canadian defense attorney Tom Kurvers dies of lung cancer at the age of 58 first appeared on Minnesota Minutes." ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1624297687) } [3]=> array(12) { ["title"]=> string(58) "Minneapolis police workers’ comp claims have skyrocketed" ["link"]=> string(65) "http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/minnesotanewsdaily/~3/koavdaUCGOg/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(15) "Dexter Peterson" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Mon, 21 Jun 2021 17:24:36 +0000" ["category"]=> string(4) "News" ["guid"]=> string(36) "https://minnesotaminutes.com/?p=6611" ["description"]=> string(1769) "
Minneapolis police workers' comp claims have skyrocketed

Minneapolis Police guard the third precinct on May 27, before it was taken over by rioters. Photo by Max Nesterak/Minnesota Reformer. The city of Minneapolis could pay some $34 million or more in workers’ compensation claims filed by city employees since the murder of George Floyd by former police officer Derek Chauvin.  The Minneapolis City […]

The post Minneapolis police workers’ comp claims have skyrocketed first appeared on Minnesota Minutes." ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(9439) "
Minneapolis police workers' comp claims have skyrocketed

Minneapolis Police guard the third precinct on May 27, before it was taken over by rioters. Photo by Max Nesterak/Minnesota Reformer.

The city of Minneapolis could pay some $34 million or more in workers’ compensation claims filed by city employees since the murder of George Floyd by former police officer Derek Chauvin. 

The Minneapolis City Council has approved 16 workers’ comp settlements out of 756 claims filed by city employees since Floyd’s murder, for injuries to employees sustained last year. Payouts have ranged from a low of $90,000 to a high of $250,000, according figures provided by the city finance office. 

The number of claims jumped nearly 69% from 2019 to 2020, from 439 to 740 claims. City finance staff said that’s largely due to police officer claims, which rose significantly in the second half of last year, though the city did not respond to specific questions about the increase.

The city is self-insured, which means departments pay premiums into a fund to cover lawsuits and workers’ comp claims. In other words, Minneapolis residents cover the costs of these lawsuits through taxes and fees.

The city’s workers’ comp self-insurance fund currently has $32.5 million in cash available, according to the city finance office.

Because of the steep increase in payouts, the police department is paying more into the city’s self-insurance fund. Workers’ comp premiums have gone up more than 66% since 2016. Additionally, following a number of steep settlements for police brutality cases, department liability premiums jumped nearly 21% from 2019 to 2020.

Last year, workers’ comp claims and expenses cost the city self-insurance fund $11.7 million, less than the year prior and on par with 2017-2018, but lots of claims are still pending.

Those employees are also entitled to monthly disability leave payments through their retirement plan. 

Attorney Ronald Meuser Jr., who represents dozens of Minneapolis cops and firefighters, said the settlements are in the best interest of injured employees and the city, since they cost less than the city would have to pay if the cases went to trial and the city had to pay for lost wages and medical expenses for life.

“The attorneys for the city of Minneapolis recognize that the city has a great deal of exposure to liability,” Meuser said. “It’s not like they’re just throwing money at these guys. These are fair settlements.”

Meuser represents about 200 Minneapolis cops and firefighters who have filed workers’ comp claims since Floyd’s murder and the aftermath. Given the current average settlement of $169,000, the total cost of those 200 claims alone could reach $34 million.

The vast majority of the employees filing workers’ comp claims have left their jobs due to a disability, specifically post-traumatic stress disorder, Meuser said. While employees can continue working after filing a claim, the majority of his clients have been unable to do so because their symptoms are triggered when they’re exposed to traumatic situations, he said.

The disability claims are paradoxical: Many residents say the trauma of police brutality is exactly what motivated the explosive reaction after Floyd was murdered. 

Professor Thomas Coghlan is a retired New York Police Department detective and professor of clinical psychology at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, which is part of the City University of New York. After retiring from NYPD in 2018, he opened a private practice to treat police officers in multiple states.

He said police unions sometimes stage “sickouts,” or encourage cops to “go dead,” meaning they stop writing tickets and making arrests and take their time on calls. They do this to “discipline” the department or community, he said. 

“How long can you go to work being vilified for having shown up to work, through no fault of your own?” Coghlan said of the possible attitude of some Minneapolis police officers.

But he said there are likely many genuine cases of post-traumatic stress disorder among Minneapolis officers after the events of 2020.

“I think what we’re seeing are high levels of post-traumatic stress disorder and burnout but also compassion fatigue, (where) you no longer see (people) as being something worth putting yourself in harms’ way,” he said. “It’s far more dangerous than burnout.”

Meuser, the attorney, said post-traumatic stress among officers is not a trifling matter. “This is a very real and very serious condition that these individuals are suffering from.”

Last week, the City Council agreed to empty its $5 million reserve fund for police overtime, to help make up for the loss of 220 full-time police employees this year. 

As the pandemic worsened and then violent crime spiraled last year, police officers left the department in droves — retiring, resigning or taking disability leave. The department had 632 sworn officers as of May 31, compared to 845 around the same time last year. About 60 officers are also on disability leave, and are still being paid.

Minneapolis Police Chief Medaria Arradondo told the council that as of May 22, the police department had spent $5.2 million on overtime this year. Arradondo said there are no more “foot beats,” meaning neighborhood police beats. Officers are focused on responding to 911 calls, he said.

An officer who was granted anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to the media said after decades on the force — during which he says he doesn’t think he used a single sick day — he went on sick leave in late June 2020 due to post-traumatic stress. 

He was in the back of the Third Precinct police station for three days, until it was evacuated by police and burned. He said he was shot at while on Hiawatha Avenue.

“I was everywhere that bad things were happening,” he said. “The big issue with the riots was that we weren’t allowed to do our jobs. We were basically told to just stand in the back of the precinct and get (hit with) rocks and bottles and fireworks and shot at without any recourse or or being able to do our police job.”

He said officers don’t feel supported by anyone from the City Council to the governor.

“In the city of Minneapolis, they treat it like it’s a joke,” he said of PTSD. “They feel like they would rather throw a cop in jail before throwing a criminal in jail. So it’s sad. It’s a sad time.”


originally published in the minnesotareformer.com

The post Minneapolis police workers’ comp claims have skyrocketed first appeared on Minnesota Minutes." } ["feedburner"]=> array(1) { ["origlink"]=> string(85) "https://minnesotaminutes.com/minneapolis-police-workers-comp-claims-have-skyrocketed/" } ["summary"]=> string(1769) "
Minneapolis police workers' comp claims have skyrocketed

Minneapolis Police guard the third precinct on May 27, before it was taken over by rioters. Photo by Max Nesterak/Minnesota Reformer. The city of Minneapolis could pay some $34 million or more in workers’ compensation claims filed by city employees since the murder of George Floyd by former police officer Derek Chauvin.  The Minneapolis City […]

The post Minneapolis police workers’ comp claims have skyrocketed first appeared on Minnesota Minutes." ["atom_content"]=> string(9439) "
Minneapolis police workers' comp claims have skyrocketed

Minneapolis Police guard the third precinct on May 27, before it was taken over by rioters. Photo by Max Nesterak/Minnesota Reformer.

The city of Minneapolis could pay some $34 million or more in workers’ compensation claims filed by city employees since the murder of George Floyd by former police officer Derek Chauvin. 

The Minneapolis City Council has approved 16 workers’ comp settlements out of 756 claims filed by city employees since Floyd’s murder, for injuries to employees sustained last year. Payouts have ranged from a low of $90,000 to a high of $250,000, according figures provided by the city finance office. 

The number of claims jumped nearly 69% from 2019 to 2020, from 439 to 740 claims. City finance staff said that’s largely due to police officer claims, which rose significantly in the second half of last year, though the city did not respond to specific questions about the increase.

The city is self-insured, which means departments pay premiums into a fund to cover lawsuits and workers’ comp claims. In other words, Minneapolis residents cover the costs of these lawsuits through taxes and fees.

The city’s workers’ comp self-insurance fund currently has $32.5 million in cash available, according to the city finance office.

Because of the steep increase in payouts, the police department is paying more into the city’s self-insurance fund. Workers’ comp premiums have gone up more than 66% since 2016. Additionally, following a number of steep settlements for police brutality cases, department liability premiums jumped nearly 21% from 2019 to 2020.

Last year, workers’ comp claims and expenses cost the city self-insurance fund $11.7 million, less than the year prior and on par with 2017-2018, but lots of claims are still pending.

Those employees are also entitled to monthly disability leave payments through their retirement plan. 

Attorney Ronald Meuser Jr., who represents dozens of Minneapolis cops and firefighters, said the settlements are in the best interest of injured employees and the city, since they cost less than the city would have to pay if the cases went to trial and the city had to pay for lost wages and medical expenses for life.

“The attorneys for the city of Minneapolis recognize that the city has a great deal of exposure to liability,” Meuser said. “It’s not like they’re just throwing money at these guys. These are fair settlements.”

Meuser represents about 200 Minneapolis cops and firefighters who have filed workers’ comp claims since Floyd’s murder and the aftermath. Given the current average settlement of $169,000, the total cost of those 200 claims alone could reach $34 million.

The vast majority of the employees filing workers’ comp claims have left their jobs due to a disability, specifically post-traumatic stress disorder, Meuser said. While employees can continue working after filing a claim, the majority of his clients have been unable to do so because their symptoms are triggered when they’re exposed to traumatic situations, he said.

The disability claims are paradoxical: Many residents say the trauma of police brutality is exactly what motivated the explosive reaction after Floyd was murdered. 

Professor Thomas Coghlan is a retired New York Police Department detective and professor of clinical psychology at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, which is part of the City University of New York. After retiring from NYPD in 2018, he opened a private practice to treat police officers in multiple states.

He said police unions sometimes stage “sickouts,” or encourage cops to “go dead,” meaning they stop writing tickets and making arrests and take their time on calls. They do this to “discipline” the department or community, he said. 

“How long can you go to work being vilified for having shown up to work, through no fault of your own?” Coghlan said of the possible attitude of some Minneapolis police officers.

But he said there are likely many genuine cases of post-traumatic stress disorder among Minneapolis officers after the events of 2020.

“I think what we’re seeing are high levels of post-traumatic stress disorder and burnout but also compassion fatigue, (where) you no longer see (people) as being something worth putting yourself in harms’ way,” he said. “It’s far more dangerous than burnout.”

Meuser, the attorney, said post-traumatic stress among officers is not a trifling matter. “This is a very real and very serious condition that these individuals are suffering from.”

Last week, the City Council agreed to empty its $5 million reserve fund for police overtime, to help make up for the loss of 220 full-time police employees this year. 

As the pandemic worsened and then violent crime spiraled last year, police officers left the department in droves — retiring, resigning or taking disability leave. The department had 632 sworn officers as of May 31, compared to 845 around the same time last year. About 60 officers are also on disability leave, and are still being paid.

Minneapolis Police Chief Medaria Arradondo told the council that as of May 22, the police department had spent $5.2 million on overtime this year. Arradondo said there are no more “foot beats,” meaning neighborhood police beats. Officers are focused on responding to 911 calls, he said.

An officer who was granted anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to the media said after decades on the force — during which he says he doesn’t think he used a single sick day — he went on sick leave in late June 2020 due to post-traumatic stress. 

He was in the back of the Third Precinct police station for three days, until it was evacuated by police and burned. He said he was shot at while on Hiawatha Avenue.

“I was everywhere that bad things were happening,” he said. “The big issue with the riots was that we weren’t allowed to do our jobs. We were basically told to just stand in the back of the precinct and get (hit with) rocks and bottles and fireworks and shot at without any recourse or or being able to do our police job.”

He said officers don’t feel supported by anyone from the City Council to the governor.

“In the city of Minneapolis, they treat it like it’s a joke,” he said of PTSD. “They feel like they would rather throw a cop in jail before throwing a criminal in jail. So it’s sad. It’s a sad time.”


originally published in the minnesotareformer.com

The post Minneapolis police workers’ comp claims have skyrocketed first appeared on Minnesota Minutes." ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1624296276) } [4]=> array(12) { ["title"]=> string(46) "Like Henry Ford, Minnesota must lead | Opinion" ["link"]=> string(65) "http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/minnesotanewsdaily/~3/KTi9g90MZD0/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(15) "Dexter Peterson" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Mon, 21 Jun 2021 15:23:02 +0000" ["category"]=> string(4) "News" ["guid"]=> string(36) "https://minnesotaminutes.com/?p=6608" ["description"]=> string(1550) "
Like Henry Ford, Minnesota must lead | Opinion

The F-150 Lightning electric pickup truck is unveiled in Michigan in May 2021. Photo by Michigan Advance. Gov. Tim Walz’s decision to adopt the vehicle emissions standards originally set by California and now adopted by 14 other states is right for Minnesota’s economy, citizens and future. Our economy is dependent upon respecting our past successes […]

The post Like Henry Ford, Minnesota must lead | Opinion first appeared on Minnesota Minutes." ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(5966) "
Like Henry Ford, Minnesota must lead | Opinion

The F-150 Lightning electric pickup truck is unveiled in Michigan in May 2021. Photo by Michigan Advance.

Gov. Tim Walz’s decision to adopt the vehicle emissions standards originally set by California and now adopted by 14 other states is right for Minnesota’s economy, citizens and future. Our economy is dependent upon respecting our past successes and challenges, but more so embracing our present and building a future that protects our environment and builds our economy. 

Like Henry Ford did in the early 1900s by first adopting a livable wage for his employees, Minnesota needs to commit to the Clean Cars Minnesota position of supporting electric vehicles (EVs) and the opportunities it will create for citizens, dealers and the economy. Like Ford Motor Company did in 2008-09 — when the company stood alone amongst the three domestic automotive manufacturers not needing a federal bailout, yet supported it for other automotive companies — we need to support the Clean Cars initiative and be leaders into the future. Like Ford did last year by being the only domestic automotive manufacturer supporting California’s position and opposing the short-lived federal rollback of stronger emissions standards, now is the time for our state to support the Clean Cars initiative. Minnesota is a state that leads. 

As a rural automotive dealer on the Canadian border, I recognize the challenges with EVs. But one argument that I strongly disagree with is that dealers will be swamped with unwanted EVs. I don’t believe it. We have over 50 reservations for the F-150 Lightning and I have more demand for the all-electric Mustang Mach-E than I can supply. Consumers want to buy EVs. I want to sell them.

Challenges aside, EVs have many advantages for consumers and dealers. While it’s true that upfront EV costs are more, charging costs are lower than using gasoline or diesel, and with significantly fewer moving parts they require less maintenance. The sticker price is more than offset by all these savings. 

The Clean Car standards will not substitute or ban any vehicles. Rather, it will complement internal combustion sales, along with providing more options. EVs are fun to drive, with incredible torque. Even my 90-year-old stepfather can’t wait to get his own F-150 Lightning. 

The longer we wait, the less choice consumers have, and the less opportunities Minnesota auto dealers will have. It is highly unlikely that EVs will be in stock at Minnesota dealerships until we are a Clean Cars state. Those vehicles will instead go to states that have adopted clean cars programs. Waiting to adopt Clean Cars will put us at a disadvantage for receiving the highly anticipated F-150 Lightning, as well as all EVs.

It would be shortsighted not to acknowledge that vehicle electrification is one of the best ways to reduce planet-warming greenhouse gas emissions. The younger generation is demanding this transition.

I realize change is hard. I grew up and continue to live in a farming community of 900 people. My best friends and neighbors are farmers. They face change more than most — farming is significantly different today than it was even five years ago. Without adapting to change, my friends would not be farming today.

The automotive world is adapting to survive, too. Manufacturers are heavily invested and committed to EVs. General Motors will be all electric by 2035. Within five years, Ford expects to sell over 1 million EVs. Government is changing with the new federal leadership and inclined to adopt policies that were previously in effect prior to 2017. Fourteen states have adopted low emission vehicle standards and zero emission standards aligned with California’s tougher rules. Most importantly, public opinion is changing. Consumers overwhelmingly support the option to purchase EVs. 

There is an argument that Minnesota should pump the brakes on this, but I would argue, like Henry Ford did in the 1900s and Ford did a century later, we should hit the accelerator and be leading instead of following. The economy supports the future of EVs. I am fully supportive of Minnesota’s efforts to increase EV sales. We must move forward smartly and effectively to set up Minnesota for success. 


originally published in the minnesotareformer.com

The post Like Henry Ford, Minnesota must lead | Opinion first appeared on Minnesota Minutes." } ["feedburner"]=> array(1) { ["origlink"]=> string(73) "https://minnesotaminutes.com/like-henry-ford-minnesota-must-lead-opinion/" } ["summary"]=> string(1550) "
Like Henry Ford, Minnesota must lead | Opinion

The F-150 Lightning electric pickup truck is unveiled in Michigan in May 2021. Photo by Michigan Advance. Gov. Tim Walz’s decision to adopt the vehicle emissions standards originally set by California and now adopted by 14 other states is right for Minnesota’s economy, citizens and future. Our economy is dependent upon respecting our past successes […]

The post Like Henry Ford, Minnesota must lead | Opinion first appeared on Minnesota Minutes." ["atom_content"]=> string(5966) "
Like Henry Ford, Minnesota must lead | Opinion

The F-150 Lightning electric pickup truck is unveiled in Michigan in May 2021. Photo by Michigan Advance.

Gov. Tim Walz’s decision to adopt the vehicle emissions standards originally set by California and now adopted by 14 other states is right for Minnesota’s economy, citizens and future. Our economy is dependent upon respecting our past successes and challenges, but more so embracing our present and building a future that protects our environment and builds our economy. 

Like Henry Ford did in the early 1900s by first adopting a livable wage for his employees, Minnesota needs to commit to the Clean Cars Minnesota position of supporting electric vehicles (EVs) and the opportunities it will create for citizens, dealers and the economy. Like Ford Motor Company did in 2008-09 — when the company stood alone amongst the three domestic automotive manufacturers not needing a federal bailout, yet supported it for other automotive companies — we need to support the Clean Cars initiative and be leaders into the future. Like Ford did last year by being the only domestic automotive manufacturer supporting California’s position and opposing the short-lived federal rollback of stronger emissions standards, now is the time for our state to support the Clean Cars initiative. Minnesota is a state that leads. 

As a rural automotive dealer on the Canadian border, I recognize the challenges with EVs. But one argument that I strongly disagree with is that dealers will be swamped with unwanted EVs. I don’t believe it. We have over 50 reservations for the F-150 Lightning and I have more demand for the all-electric Mustang Mach-E than I can supply. Consumers want to buy EVs. I want to sell them.

Challenges aside, EVs have many advantages for consumers and dealers. While it’s true that upfront EV costs are more, charging costs are lower than using gasoline or diesel, and with significantly fewer moving parts they require less maintenance. The sticker price is more than offset by all these savings. 

The Clean Car standards will not substitute or ban any vehicles. Rather, it will complement internal combustion sales, along with providing more options. EVs are fun to drive, with incredible torque. Even my 90-year-old stepfather can’t wait to get his own F-150 Lightning. 

The longer we wait, the less choice consumers have, and the less opportunities Minnesota auto dealers will have. It is highly unlikely that EVs will be in stock at Minnesota dealerships until we are a Clean Cars state. Those vehicles will instead go to states that have adopted clean cars programs. Waiting to adopt Clean Cars will put us at a disadvantage for receiving the highly anticipated F-150 Lightning, as well as all EVs.

It would be shortsighted not to acknowledge that vehicle electrification is one of the best ways to reduce planet-warming greenhouse gas emissions. The younger generation is demanding this transition.

I realize change is hard. I grew up and continue to live in a farming community of 900 people. My best friends and neighbors are farmers. They face change more than most — farming is significantly different today than it was even five years ago. Without adapting to change, my friends would not be farming today.

The automotive world is adapting to survive, too. Manufacturers are heavily invested and committed to EVs. General Motors will be all electric by 2035. Within five years, Ford expects to sell over 1 million EVs. Government is changing with the new federal leadership and inclined to adopt policies that were previously in effect prior to 2017. Fourteen states have adopted low emission vehicle standards and zero emission standards aligned with California’s tougher rules. Most importantly, public opinion is changing. Consumers overwhelmingly support the option to purchase EVs. 

There is an argument that Minnesota should pump the brakes on this, but I would argue, like Henry Ford did in the 1900s and Ford did a century later, we should hit the accelerator and be leading instead of following. The economy supports the future of EVs. I am fully supportive of Minnesota’s efforts to increase EV sales. We must move forward smartly and effectively to set up Minnesota for success. 


originally published in the minnesotareformer.com

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Settled into new homes, refugees in US say they are working for a better life for all

Violence, persecution and wars amid a global pandemic added to the growing number of displaced persons around the world last year. The United Nations reports that 11.2 million people were displaced from their homelands in 2020, bringing the total number of displaced persons in the world to 82.4 million.  Of those forced to flee their […]

The post Settled into new homes, refugees in US say they are working for a better life for all first appeared on Minnesota Minutes." ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(34872) "
Settled into new homes, refugees in US say they are working for a better life for all

Violence, persecution and wars amid a global pandemic added to the growing number of displaced persons around the world last year.

The United Nations reports that 11.2 million people were displaced from their homelands in 2020, bringing the total number of displaced persons in the world to 82.4 million. 

Of those forced to flee their homes, 1.4 million had to leave their country. According to the U.N., Turkey hosted the largest number of refugees in 2020, taking in just under 4 million people, the majority coming from Syria. Colombia was next, taking in more than 1.7 million displaced Venezuelans. Germany, Pakistan and Uganda also are in the top five hosting countries, with each resettling more than a million people.

The United States was far below those numbers, resettling 11,814 refugees last year.

President Joe Biden, who campaigned on promises of facilitating immigration and increasing admissions for refugees, recently, increased admissions from 15,000 to 62,500. Immigrant rights activists say more needs to be done.

Between October and May, the U.S. admitted 3,250 refugees, according to Department of State data

For World Refugee Day, reporters at States Newsroom spoke to several refugees who agreed to tell their stories.

Petronille Kabanga, 52, Democratic Republic of the Congo

Petronille Kabanga, a Phoenix resident, poses for a photo inside her store selling handmade crafts and decorations in north Phoenix on Friday, June 18, 2021. Kabanga fled Congo in 2003 and is one of the thousands of refugees who now call Arizona home. Photo by Laura Gómez/Arizona Mirror.

By Laura Gómez | Arizona Mirror

Petronille Kabanga’s husband worked as a journalist in the Democratic Republic of Congo. In 2003, he took a picture of a protest where the military killed nearly 100 people, Kabanga said. He was warned to not publish the photos because they contradicted the government’s account that a few people were killed. But he published the photos. 

Soldiers then came to their home, and took her husband. Kabanga went into hiding for a few days with their six children. But they weren’t safe anywhere. Her husband was released and came back with a message. 

“Run away, just go,” he was told. The family fled their home and country.

For 13 years, they lived in a refugee camp in Zimbabwe. They had their seventh child there. 

“Living in the camp is not easy. I didn’t know how to cook with the firewood, that was my first experience, go and do the garden, go fetch water, it was not easy,” Kabanga said. 

In May 2016, the family resettled in Arizona. Her children, now ages 25 through 15, adapted well to school, play sports and are going to college. She wants to teach other refugees to value school and encourage their children to get an education, before starting to work. 

“Maybe I’ll do a workshop with the parents to teach them the value of the school. It is for the benefit of their children and their parents,” she said. 

The couple recently opened an African imports store in north Phoenix where they sell handmade furniture, jewelry boxes made from wood, leather baskets and natural fiber decorations made in Congo. They also sell cooking ingredients and frozen food. 

Kabanga’s also aching to help young women and girls in the Kasai region where she’s from. The province is rich in minerals like diamonds, but also known for the armed groups that terrorize the area. The region, and the country, is experiencing food insecurity

“People are suffering,” Kabanga said. “It’s shameful …. my country, there’s too many things. I want to help women with the school, maybe we can buy a sewing machine for them.”

Jaime Enrique Ramirez Corredor, 65, Colombia

Jaime Enrique Ramirez Corredor, 65, is a refugee from Colombia forced to leave because right-wing paramilitary members threatened him. He looks at news websites from his laptop in a west Phoenix apartment where he lives. Photo by Laura Gómez/Arizona Mirror.

By Laura Gómez | Arizona Mirror

Jaime Enrique Ramirez Corredor was forced to leave Colombia in 2014. His business in a rural community of sugar cane growers was targeted by right-wing paramilitaries who threatened to burn down his house. He fled to neighboring Ecuador. Four years ago, Ramirez arrived in Arizona as a refugee. 

“It’s been seven years since I don’t see my family and my kids,” Ramirez said in Spanish. “And it hurts. Colombia hurts.”

Last year, out of the 58 refugees who arrived in Arizona, three of them were from Colombia, the state Department of Economic Security reported

In 2018, Ramirez worked in the tortilla-making section of El Super, a grocery store. A sack of flour he was lifting fell and he injured his right arm. He couldn’t work, and lost his income. Ramirez lived out of his car for six months. 

Since arriving in Arizona, he’s found it difficult to feel like he belongs. 

“I feel very alone here,” he said. 

Ramirez now works informally as a private driver. Recently, he’s been moved to tears after watching videos on his phone of police brutally responding to massive anti-government protests that began on April 28 in the South American country of 50 million people. 

“We, the older generation, were incapable of handing over a better country to our young people because of cowardice,” Ramirez said. 

Ramirez has attended gatherings from Colombians living in Arizona to bring awareness about the social upheaval that’s resulted in 68 deaths, most allegedly at the hands of police. 

He said he feels sad and powerless watching the deadly repression of protests. But he also speaks up against any government that keeps its people in poverty, in hunger. 

“I’ve never been someone who stays silent about injustices,” Ramirez said. “The crimes committed (abroad) by the U.S. government throughout the years are many. It is curious that the government that produces the most refugees is the U.S., and here is where refugees arrive from different places like Iraq and Afghanistan.”

Nejra Sumic, 34, Bosnia

Nejra Sumic, 34, arrived in Arizona as a refugee from Bosnia in 1995. She now works as national field manager at We Are All America, a national campaign advocating for refugees, people seeking asylum, those with Temporary Protected Status and immigrants. Photo by Laura Gómez/Arizona Mirror.

By Laura Gómez | Arizona Mirror

Nejra Sumic was 6 years old when a civil war forced the little girl and her mother to flee Bosnia and Herzegovina. They didn’t just leave their life behind. Nejra’s dad had gone missing. 

“I was 6, but I remember everything,” Sumic said. “We were separated from my father. We didn’t know his whereabouts for a year.” 

Sumic and her mother had fled to Croatia. There they found that the mine where her father worked was turned into a concentration camp, where he was held captive.  

A year later, thanks to a British journalist who uncovered her dad’s whereabouts, her dad was freed and they reunited in Croatia. The refugee family was then displaced to Spain on a military ship. They lived there for three years until they were resettled in the U.S. 

Sumic arrived in Arizona in 1995. That year, Arizona became the home of 445 refugees from Bosnia. Thousands more will follow in the years to come. 

Now, Sumic works as national field manager at We Are All America, a national campaign advocating at the local government and Congressional levels for refugees, people seeking asylum, those with Temporary Protected Status and immigrants. 

Sumic said she’s found solace in this work.  

“I think in a way it’s helped me heal from a lot of the trauma knowing what that experience is like,” Sumic said. “That journey allows me to be of service in a way that I feel is the best way I can be of service. I’m lucky to have that as a job.”

Sumic also advocates for more funds to help refugees resettle and thrive in their new communities. 

“With World Refugee Day coming up, it’s an opportunity for us all to reflect that there are other people around the world who are still suffering and experiencing war, famine, all sorts of things,” she said. “We cannot shut our doors. We need to continue to welcome people with open arms. Nobody deserves to live in a place where they are not safe, where they cannot raise their family.”

Mohamed Juma, 29, Sudan

Mohamed Juma arrived in Aurora, Colorado, in 2013 after spending eight years in a Kenyan refugee camp. Originally from Sudan, Juma now works as a community navigator, investment associate and public speaker. Photo courtesy of Robert Kalman for Colorado Newsline.

By Faith Miller | Colorado Newsline

After Mohamed Juma, his seven younger siblings and their parents escaped Sudan during a civil war and humanitarian crisis, they spent eight years waiting in a Kenyan refugee camp. They were finally accepted as U.S. refugees in 2013.

Juma now visits elementary and middle schools to talk to Colorado students. From personal experience, he speaks of the challenges that “refugees and immigrants face when they come to the United States.”

On top of the trauma of war and displacement, Juma’s family faced plenty of challenges. 

When they first arrived in Aurora, Colorado, it was April and snowing — not at all like Kenya. They didn’t speak English, and didn’t know anyone except for Juma’s uncle, who’d arrived from the same refugee camp a couple of months earlier. Making friends was difficult.

“People in the U.S. are not friendly like back where we came from,” Juma reflected. “You cannot go and just knock on somebody’s door.”

But case workers and other refugees in Aurora helped the family with housing, job applications and transportation. 

Juma, now 29, speaks Swahili, Arabic and English, among other languages. He works as a community navigator to help new arrivals feel safe and welcome. As an investment associate, Juma also supports community members who want to start their own businesses.

Juma wants people from the U.S. to understand that immigrants and refugees are human beings, and “not here to, for example, take your jobs.”

“They’re just families trying to help their children to have a better life,” Juma said, adding: “So just forget the hate … let’s just spread love and see how we can learn from each other.”

Naquetta Ricks, 54, Liberia

Colorado state Rep. Naquetta Ricks, a Democrat who represents the diverse community of Aurora, fled to the U.S. in 1980 from Liberia. Several years later, her family was granted a pathway to citizenship under legislation signed by then-President Ronald Reagan. Photo courtesy of Rep. Naquetta Ricks for Colorado Newsline.

By Faith Miller | Colorado Newsline

After a firing squad executed her fiance in Liberia’s 1980 military coup, Naquetta Ricks’ mother secured a medical leave of absence from work and fled with her children to Chicago. 

The family moved to Colorado a few months later. Without a lawyer, their attempts to gain asylum status were at first fruitless. Then in 1986, a path to citizenship opened up when then-President Ronald Reagan signed legislation granting amnesty to millions of undocumented immigrants. 

Today, Ricks represents her Aurora community in the Colorado House of Representatives.

After losing races for the University of Colorado Board of Regents and Aurora City Council, Ricks contemplated staying out of politics — until Donald Trump was elected president, and she noticed increasing negative rhetoric about immigrants.

Last year, 717 refugees, asylees and Special Immigrant Visa holders arrived in Colorado, according to the Colorado Refugee Services Program. Most were originally from Afghanistan, Cuba or the Democratic Republic of Congo.

“We really need people who are going to talk about the contributions of immigrants,” she said. “They are underrepresented. They are underserved when it comes to politics, and so I think it was important to have some different voices to bring the true reflection of immigrants to the table.”

As a Democratic state representative, Ricks draws on her experience as a business leader — having served as president of the African Chamber of Commerce of Colorado — a refugee, a single mother, small business owner and mortgage broker. She’s passionate about helping community members achieve home ownership. 

But just like adjusting to a new country far from home, winning an election took a lot of work, she adds. 

“It was a seven-year journey,” she said. 

Nga Vương-Sandoval, Việt Nam

Nga Vương-Sandoval is a Denver resident and an accomplished former refugee who fled war in Việt Nam. Photo courtesy of Nga Vương-Sandoval.

By Laura Gómez | Arizona Mirror

Nga Vương-Sandoval left in fear, running, fleeing war in Việt Nam. She was 3. 

“We hastily ran and boarded a rickety old cargo ship that was not intended for human passengers,” Vương-Sandoval said in a November 2020 TED talk. “As our ship leisurely drifted away from the land, we gazed in horror. At that moment we became refugees.”

Vương-Sandoval was first displaced to Guam, and then resettled in the U.S. She lived in Arkansas and Alabama before settling in Colorado. 

She is a Denver resident and an accomplished leader and advocate for refugees. Vương-Sandoval works with state legislatures and advocates in Congress for the U.S. to welcome more refugees and address the core problems that cause displacement. 

“Human beings will not need to flee their homes if there was peace, if there wasn’t instability,” she told Arizona Mirror. 

Vương-Sandoval remembers when earlier this year, President Joe Biden broke his campaign promise to reverse the previous administration’s historically low refugee admission numbers. After backlash for keeping the 15,000 yearly admissions from the Trump years, the Biden administration changed course and raised the refugee cap to around 62,500 — still below the expected 125,000 target.  

“You need to keep your promise because every number represents a human being,” Vương-Sandoval said. 

Globally she thinks addressing displaced, stateless people needs to be a priority. 

“We have 26 million refugees in the world, and yet it is something that is not even in the forefront,” Vương-Sandoval said. 

 Basma Alawee, 35, Iraq

Basma Alawee, a Jacksonville resident, arrived under a Special Immigrant Visa in the U.S. in 2010. She is now an organizer with We Are All America working to empower refugee communities nationally to share their own stories. Photo courtesy of Basma Alawee.

By Laura Gómez | Arizona Mirror

Basma Alawee and her family lived in Baghdad. She had a material engineering degree and worked in the oil industry. Her husband worked with American troops as an interpreter. But they were threatened and Alawee, her husband and their 1-year-old daughter were forced to leave. 

When the three were resettled in the U.S. in 2010, Alawee was eager to share her skills and knowledge. She struggled to validate her degree in the U.S. and instead taught math and science to middle and high school students. 

“I felt for a time that my skills were wasted,” said Alawee of Jacksonville. “I started teaching math and science, but always felt like there are so many wasted skills from refugees when they come.”

She helped create and translate materials for GED and citizenship classes. Alawee then learned that many other highly-skilled refugees and immigrants faced similar challenges to her. 

“That is what activated me,” Alawee said. “I started understating that our struggles as refugees are connected with the struggles of immigrant communities and minorities communities that are Americans themselves.”

She joined the Florida Immigrant Coalition to advocate for different refugee and immigrant communities. 

“The U.S. and other countries are part of the root cause of why we forcibly migrated,” Alawee said. 

Now, she works for a national campaign at We Are All America in leadership training and advocacy for the refugee community because everyone has their own truth to tell.   

“My truth is not going to be the truth as others. I cannot represent the woman from Congo who lived all her life in a refugee camp, or the mother from Central America, or even represent the struggle of the LGBTQ community,” Alawee said. “We need to shift from being advocates to organizers. Instead of me going to represent them, I am training and empowering my community so we can go together and represent, not speak on behalf of one another.”

Halima Hamud, 22, Somalia

Halima Hamud has been awarded the prestigious Harry S. Truman Scholarship for her tremendous academic success and leadership accomplishments. Hamud will graduate with a Bachelor of Science in Political Science degree in May 2022 and is Boise State’s fifth Truman scholar, Photo by Priscilla Grover

By Audrey Dutton | Idaho Capitol Sun

Halima Hamud’s family fled the Somali Civil War in the early 1990s and spent almost 20 years in a refugee camp in Kenya. That’s where she was born.

Hamud remembers crying when her family left the only home she knew to come to the U.S. in 2009. Her family was among 98 refugees from Somalia to resettle in Boise, Idaho, that year — and hundreds more Somali refugees have since resettled since the mid-2000s.

Hamud started school in Boise as a fourth grader at Whitney Elementary and took several years to learn English.

“I didn’t even know how to do math — adding and subtracting — because I was so focused on the environment,” she said. “I was being bullied, sometimes I was the only girl wearing a hijab in the class. … Kids are ruthless sometimes.”

She began to wear jeans and take off her hijab at school.

“I did fit in, but it was at a very high cost, because it wasn’t me,” she says. “I was doing something that deep in my heart I didn’t want to do, just to fit in.”

The harassment didn’t end with childhood; the bullies just got older. Recently, someone called her the “N word” while she was shopping.

“Being a Black Muslim woman in Idaho is just very difficult,” she said, but chose to focus instead on “what this city and this community can do for you.”

She pointed to Idaho’s refugee-focused nonprofits and Boise’s large refugee community. She credited them, and two teachers (“Miss Robin” and “Miss Rowe”) with helping her find her place.

Hamud plans to graduate from Boise State University next May. This year, she was the fifth BSU student to win the prestigious Harry S. Truman Scholarship.

Arnobia Bernal Ramirez, 57, Colombia

Alone and afraid of being followed by a dangerous Colombian group, Arnobia Bernal Ramirez isolated herself from the world when she arrived in Baltimore in 2019. She’s since found community with other refugees through Asylee Women Enterprise. Photo by Hannah Gaskill/Maryland Matters.

By Hannah Gaskill | Maryland Matters

Maryland was home to 763 refugees in 2019, and one of them was Arnobia Bernal Ramirez, 57. 

Bernal Ramirez fled Colombia to Ecuador with her son, who has a cognitive disability, in 2016 after she was exploited and threatened by a local group. Unable to escape the danger, Bernal Ramirez applied for asylum in the U.S.

As a Spanish speaker, she spoke to Maryland Matters through Andrea Sanchez, an intern at Asylee Women Enterprise, a Baltimore organization that helps asylum seekers.

“She did live a bit of a calm life [in Ecuador] for a while, but [the harassers] ended up following her there,” Sanchez said. 

Through tears, Bernal Ramirez said she felt alone when she arrived in Baltimore and was constantly paranoid that she and her son would be discovered.

“She was constantly living in fear that one day those people would find her, recognize her and her son on the street and kill [them],” said Sanchez.

Unable to speak English or communicate with her 35-year-old nonverbal son, Andres Bernal Ramirez hid from the world for months until she connected with Asylee Women Enterprise (AWE), where she found support and a job.

“At first she was very reluctant,” said Sanchez. “She felt as if she wasn’t worthy of getting help or any resources.”

But Bernal Ramirez said crossing the threshold at AWE felt like learning “what it was to live again.” 

And while some people can be “hateful,” Bernal Ramirez admires the community she’s found.

“She doesn’t really even think the stereotypes [of immigrants] matter just because of the sheer amount of people that do actually care … and think that immigrants are worthy of being here,” Sanchez said.

Alex Mutabazi, 45, Democratic Republic of Congo


Alex Mutabazi and his family came to Tennessee to escape the violence in Central Africa. He has since started a church to help other refugees. Photo by John Partipilo/Tennessee Lookout.

By Dulce Torres | Tennessee Lookout

Alex Mutabazi, 45, lost everything during the yearslong violence that spread through much of Central Africa.
After the 1994 Rwandan genocide that killed millions, millions more fled to the Democratic Republic of Congo in order to escape. Among the refugees were rebel groups, which prompted an invasion of Congo, resulting in widespread destruction.

Among the chaos, Mutabazi, his wife, seven children and extended family struggled to survive. Among the victims of the war was his mother, and after losing his property and livestock, the family had nowhere to go. 

“I could not eat when my family could not eat and were dying,” he said. 

A peace treaty was signed in 2003, but conflicts continued into the next decade. In 2016, Mutabazi and his family migrated to Tennessee into the political turmoil that comes from changing presidential administrations. 

Mutabazi’s family was one of 2,051 that migrated that year to Tennessee, most being from Congo, Iraq, Syria and Somalia. Advocates helped them resettle, but refugees still struggled with discrimination due to language barriers and limited knowledge about local laws.

Seeing this, Mutabazi founded a church, called His Grace Christian Life Church, so the community could gather, worship in their own language and discuss the problems affecting them in their daily lives. 

By August of this year, Mutabazi and his family will have been in the U.S. for five years and hope they will soon be able to start the process of becoming American citizens. Mutabazi has founded two churches in Nashville and Knoxville and has 155 members. 

With another child on the way, Mutabazi knows the struggles of being a refugee hundreds of miles away from their homeland and hopes Joe Biden’s administration will fulfill his campaign promises to facilitate admission to the U.S.

“Life in Africa is so tough because of many reasons. Right now, in my country, they are having a war,” said Mutabazi.  “I wish my four brothers will be able to join us here, because where they are now, they are not safe.”

Manasse Matala, 19, Zimbabwe

By Noah Taborda | Kansas Reflector

Manasse Matala, 19, endeavors each day to ensure he does not waste the educational opportunities available to him in the United States.

Matala and his family resettled in Wichita, one of an estimated 3.4 million Zimbabweans who have fled their home country to escape violence and killings. Kansas’s culture came as quite a shock, especially for someone whose English was shaky.

Through his studies, Matala said he overcame many of those language barriers. Still, the lack of fluency did affect his French-speaking family.

“My mom didn’t know how to speak English and it would be very hard for her to communicate or to find something like a job,” he said.

Now, Matala is hoping to bring inspiration and hope to more refugees through, of all things, speaking. He graduated from Southeast High School in May, and while he plans to pursue a degree in pre-medicine, he also wants to be a motivational speaker.

His message is a tried and true one — hard work pays off. Matala channels his own personal experience from things as difficult as overcoming language barriers to learning piano or playing soccer to demonstrate this.

He has also considered physical therapy as a possible career path. Whatever directions he takes, he wants to dispel misconceptions that refugees are a burden on their new country.

“I asked some of my friends about what you think about refugees, and everyone is telling me this bad stuff. I didn’t show my sadness, but it did break my heart a little,” Matala said. “We can’t just come in and start acting without even knowing the culture. We don’t even know what is going on.”

Minnesota Reformer is part of States Newsroom, a network of news outlets supported by grants and a coalition of donors as a 501c(3) public charity. Minnesota Reformer maintains editorial independence. Contact Editor Patrick Coolican for questions: info@minnesotareformer.com. Follow Minnesota Reformer on Facebook and Twitter.


originally published in the minnesotareformer.com

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Settled into new homes, refugees in US say they are working for a better life for all

Violence, persecution and wars amid a global pandemic added to the growing number of displaced persons around the world last year. The United Nations reports that 11.2 million people were displaced from their homelands in 2020, bringing the total number of displaced persons in the world to 82.4 million.  Of those forced to flee their […]

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Settled into new homes, refugees in US say they are working for a better life for all

Violence, persecution and wars amid a global pandemic added to the growing number of displaced persons around the world last year.

The United Nations reports that 11.2 million people were displaced from their homelands in 2020, bringing the total number of displaced persons in the world to 82.4 million. 

Of those forced to flee their homes, 1.4 million had to leave their country. According to the U.N., Turkey hosted the largest number of refugees in 2020, taking in just under 4 million people, the majority coming from Syria. Colombia was next, taking in more than 1.7 million displaced Venezuelans. Germany, Pakistan and Uganda also are in the top five hosting countries, with each resettling more than a million people.

The United States was far below those numbers, resettling 11,814 refugees last year.

President Joe Biden, who campaigned on promises of facilitating immigration and increasing admissions for refugees, recently, increased admissions from 15,000 to 62,500. Immigrant rights activists say more needs to be done.

Between October and May, the U.S. admitted 3,250 refugees, according to Department of State data

For World Refugee Day, reporters at States Newsroom spoke to several refugees who agreed to tell their stories.

Petronille Kabanga, 52, Democratic Republic of the Congo

Petronille Kabanga, a Phoenix resident, poses for a photo inside her store selling handmade crafts and decorations in north Phoenix on Friday, June 18, 2021. Kabanga fled Congo in 2003 and is one of the thousands of refugees who now call Arizona home. Photo by Laura Gómez/Arizona Mirror.

By Laura Gómez | Arizona Mirror

Petronille Kabanga’s husband worked as a journalist in the Democratic Republic of Congo. In 2003, he took a picture of a protest where the military killed nearly 100 people, Kabanga said. He was warned to not publish the photos because they contradicted the government’s account that a few people were killed. But he published the photos. 

Soldiers then came to their home, and took her husband. Kabanga went into hiding for a few days with their six children. But they weren’t safe anywhere. Her husband was released and came back with a message. 

“Run away, just go,” he was told. The family fled their home and country.

For 13 years, they lived in a refugee camp in Zimbabwe. They had their seventh child there. 

“Living in the camp is not easy. I didn’t know how to cook with the firewood, that was my first experience, go and do the garden, go fetch water, it was not easy,” Kabanga said. 

In May 2016, the family resettled in Arizona. Her children, now ages 25 through 15, adapted well to school, play sports and are going to college. She wants to teach other refugees to value school and encourage their children to get an education, before starting to work. 

“Maybe I’ll do a workshop with the parents to teach them the value of the school. It is for the benefit of their children and their parents,” she said. 

The couple recently opened an African imports store in north Phoenix where they sell handmade furniture, jewelry boxes made from wood, leather baskets and natural fiber decorations made in Congo. They also sell cooking ingredients and frozen food. 

Kabanga’s also aching to help young women and girls in the Kasai region where she’s from. The province is rich in minerals like diamonds, but also known for the armed groups that terrorize the area. The region, and the country, is experiencing food insecurity

“People are suffering,” Kabanga said. “It’s shameful …. my country, there’s too many things. I want to help women with the school, maybe we can buy a sewing machine for them.”

Jaime Enrique Ramirez Corredor, 65, Colombia

Jaime Enrique Ramirez Corredor, 65, is a refugee from Colombia forced to leave because right-wing paramilitary members threatened him. He looks at news websites from his laptop in a west Phoenix apartment where he lives. Photo by Laura Gómez/Arizona Mirror.

By Laura Gómez | Arizona Mirror

Jaime Enrique Ramirez Corredor was forced to leave Colombia in 2014. His business in a rural community of sugar cane growers was targeted by right-wing paramilitaries who threatened to burn down his house. He fled to neighboring Ecuador. Four years ago, Ramirez arrived in Arizona as a refugee. 

“It’s been seven years since I don’t see my family and my kids,” Ramirez said in Spanish. “And it hurts. Colombia hurts.”

Last year, out of the 58 refugees who arrived in Arizona, three of them were from Colombia, the state Department of Economic Security reported

In 2018, Ramirez worked in the tortilla-making section of El Super, a grocery store. A sack of flour he was lifting fell and he injured his right arm. He couldn’t work, and lost his income. Ramirez lived out of his car for six months. 

Since arriving in Arizona, he’s found it difficult to feel like he belongs. 

“I feel very alone here,” he said. 

Ramirez now works informally as a private driver. Recently, he’s been moved to tears after watching videos on his phone of police brutally responding to massive anti-government protests that began on April 28 in the South American country of 50 million people. 

“We, the older generation, were incapable of handing over a better country to our young people because of cowardice,” Ramirez said. 

Ramirez has attended gatherings from Colombians living in Arizona to bring awareness about the social upheaval that’s resulted in 68 deaths, most allegedly at the hands of police. 

He said he feels sad and powerless watching the deadly repression of protests. But he also speaks up against any government that keeps its people in poverty, in hunger. 

“I’ve never been someone who stays silent about injustices,” Ramirez said. “The crimes committed (abroad) by the U.S. government throughout the years are many. It is curious that the government that produces the most refugees is the U.S., and here is where refugees arrive from different places like Iraq and Afghanistan.”

Nejra Sumic, 34, Bosnia

Nejra Sumic, 34, arrived in Arizona as a refugee from Bosnia in 1995. She now works as national field manager at We Are All America, a national campaign advocating for refugees, people seeking asylum, those with Temporary Protected Status and immigrants. Photo by Laura Gómez/Arizona Mirror.

By Laura Gómez | Arizona Mirror

Nejra Sumic was 6 years old when a civil war forced the little girl and her mother to flee Bosnia and Herzegovina. They didn’t just leave their life behind. Nejra’s dad had gone missing. 

“I was 6, but I remember everything,” Sumic said. “We were separated from my father. We didn’t know his whereabouts for a year.” 

Sumic and her mother had fled to Croatia. There they found that the mine where her father worked was turned into a concentration camp, where he was held captive.  

A year later, thanks to a British journalist who uncovered her dad’s whereabouts, her dad was freed and they reunited in Croatia. The refugee family was then displaced to Spain on a military ship. They lived there for three years until they were resettled in the U.S. 

Sumic arrived in Arizona in 1995. That year, Arizona became the home of 445 refugees from Bosnia. Thousands more will follow in the years to come. 

Now, Sumic works as national field manager at We Are All America, a national campaign advocating at the local government and Congressional levels for refugees, people seeking asylum, those with Temporary Protected Status and immigrants. 

Sumic said she’s found solace in this work.  

“I think in a way it’s helped me heal from a lot of the trauma knowing what that experience is like,” Sumic said. “That journey allows me to be of service in a way that I feel is the best way I can be of service. I’m lucky to have that as a job.”

Sumic also advocates for more funds to help refugees resettle and thrive in their new communities. 

“With World Refugee Day coming up, it’s an opportunity for us all to reflect that there are other people around the world who are still suffering and experiencing war, famine, all sorts of things,” she said. “We cannot shut our doors. We need to continue to welcome people with open arms. Nobody deserves to live in a place where they are not safe, where they cannot raise their family.”

Mohamed Juma, 29, Sudan

Mohamed Juma arrived in Aurora, Colorado, in 2013 after spending eight years in a Kenyan refugee camp. Originally from Sudan, Juma now works as a community navigator, investment associate and public speaker. Photo courtesy of Robert Kalman for Colorado Newsline.

By Faith Miller | Colorado Newsline

After Mohamed Juma, his seven younger siblings and their parents escaped Sudan during a civil war and humanitarian crisis, they spent eight years waiting in a Kenyan refugee camp. They were finally accepted as U.S. refugees in 2013.

Juma now visits elementary and middle schools to talk to Colorado students. From personal experience, he speaks of the challenges that “refugees and immigrants face when they come to the United States.”

On top of the trauma of war and displacement, Juma’s family faced plenty of challenges. 

When they first arrived in Aurora, Colorado, it was April and snowing — not at all like Kenya. They didn’t speak English, and didn’t know anyone except for Juma’s uncle, who’d arrived from the same refugee camp a couple of months earlier. Making friends was difficult.

“People in the U.S. are not friendly like back where we came from,” Juma reflected. “You cannot go and just knock on somebody’s door.”

But case workers and other refugees in Aurora helped the family with housing, job applications and transportation. 

Juma, now 29, speaks Swahili, Arabic and English, among other languages. He works as a community navigator to help new arrivals feel safe and welcome. As an investment associate, Juma also supports community members who want to start their own businesses.

Juma wants people from the U.S. to understand that immigrants and refugees are human beings, and “not here to, for example, take your jobs.”

“They’re just families trying to help their children to have a better life,” Juma said, adding: “So just forget the hate … let’s just spread love and see how we can learn from each other.”

Naquetta Ricks, 54, Liberia

Colorado state Rep. Naquetta Ricks, a Democrat who represents the diverse community of Aurora, fled to the U.S. in 1980 from Liberia. Several years later, her family was granted a pathway to citizenship under legislation signed by then-President Ronald Reagan. Photo courtesy of Rep. Naquetta Ricks for Colorado Newsline.

By Faith Miller | Colorado Newsline

After a firing squad executed her fiance in Liberia’s 1980 military coup, Naquetta Ricks’ mother secured a medical leave of absence from work and fled with her children to Chicago. 

The family moved to Colorado a few months later. Without a lawyer, their attempts to gain asylum status were at first fruitless. Then in 1986, a path to citizenship opened up when then-President Ronald Reagan signed legislation granting amnesty to millions of undocumented immigrants. 

Today, Ricks represents her Aurora community in the Colorado House of Representatives.

After losing races for the University of Colorado Board of Regents and Aurora City Council, Ricks contemplated staying out of politics — until Donald Trump was elected president, and she noticed increasing negative rhetoric about immigrants.

Last year, 717 refugees, asylees and Special Immigrant Visa holders arrived in Colorado, according to the Colorado Refugee Services Program. Most were originally from Afghanistan, Cuba or the Democratic Republic of Congo.

“We really need people who are going to talk about the contributions of immigrants,” she said. “They are underrepresented. They are underserved when it comes to politics, and so I think it was important to have some different voices to bring the true reflection of immigrants to the table.”

As a Democratic state representative, Ricks draws on her experience as a business leader — having served as president of the African Chamber of Commerce of Colorado — a refugee, a single mother, small business owner and mortgage broker. She’s passionate about helping community members achieve home ownership. 

But just like adjusting to a new country far from home, winning an election took a lot of work, she adds. 

“It was a seven-year journey,” she said. 

Nga Vương-Sandoval, Việt Nam

Nga Vương-Sandoval is a Denver resident and an accomplished former refugee who fled war in Việt Nam. Photo courtesy of Nga Vương-Sandoval.

By Laura Gómez | Arizona Mirror

Nga Vương-Sandoval left in fear, running, fleeing war in Việt Nam. She was 3. 

“We hastily ran and boarded a rickety old cargo ship that was not intended for human passengers,” Vương-Sandoval said in a November 2020 TED talk. “As our ship leisurely drifted away from the land, we gazed in horror. At that moment we became refugees.”

Vương-Sandoval was first displaced to Guam, and then resettled in the U.S. She lived in Arkansas and Alabama before settling in Colorado. 

She is a Denver resident and an accomplished leader and advocate for refugees. Vương-Sandoval works with state legislatures and advocates in Congress for the U.S. to welcome more refugees and address the core problems that cause displacement. 

“Human beings will not need to flee their homes if there was peace, if there wasn’t instability,” she told Arizona Mirror. 

Vương-Sandoval remembers when earlier this year, President Joe Biden broke his campaign promise to reverse the previous administration’s historically low refugee admission numbers. After backlash for keeping the 15,000 yearly admissions from the Trump years, the Biden administration changed course and raised the refugee cap to around 62,500 — still below the expected 125,000 target.  

“You need to keep your promise because every number represents a human being,” Vương-Sandoval said. 

Globally she thinks addressing displaced, stateless people needs to be a priority. 

“We have 26 million refugees in the world, and yet it is something that is not even in the forefront,” Vương-Sandoval said. 

 Basma Alawee, 35, Iraq

Basma Alawee, a Jacksonville resident, arrived under a Special Immigrant Visa in the U.S. in 2010. She is now an organizer with We Are All America working to empower refugee communities nationally to share their own stories. Photo courtesy of Basma Alawee.

By Laura Gómez | Arizona Mirror

Basma Alawee and her family lived in Baghdad. She had a material engineering degree and worked in the oil industry. Her husband worked with American troops as an interpreter. But they were threatened and Alawee, her husband and their 1-year-old daughter were forced to leave. 

When the three were resettled in the U.S. in 2010, Alawee was eager to share her skills and knowledge. She struggled to validate her degree in the U.S. and instead taught math and science to middle and high school students. 

“I felt for a time that my skills were wasted,” said Alawee of Jacksonville. “I started teaching math and science, but always felt like there are so many wasted skills from refugees when they come.”

She helped create and translate materials for GED and citizenship classes. Alawee then learned that many other highly-skilled refugees and immigrants faced similar challenges to her. 

“That is what activated me,” Alawee said. “I started understating that our struggles as refugees are connected with the struggles of immigrant communities and minorities communities that are Americans themselves.”

She joined the Florida Immigrant Coalition to advocate for different refugee and immigrant communities. 

“The U.S. and other countries are part of the root cause of why we forcibly migrated,” Alawee said. 

Now, she works for a national campaign at We Are All America in leadership training and advocacy for the refugee community because everyone has their own truth to tell.   

“My truth is not going to be the truth as others. I cannot represent the woman from Congo who lived all her life in a refugee camp, or the mother from Central America, or even represent the struggle of the LGBTQ community,” Alawee said. “We need to shift from being advocates to organizers. Instead of me going to represent them, I am training and empowering my community so we can go together and represent, not speak on behalf of one another.”

Halima Hamud, 22, Somalia

Halima Hamud has been awarded the prestigious Harry S. Truman Scholarship for her tremendous academic success and leadership accomplishments. Hamud will graduate with a Bachelor of Science in Political Science degree in May 2022 and is Boise State’s fifth Truman scholar, Photo by Priscilla Grover

By Audrey Dutton | Idaho Capitol Sun

Halima Hamud’s family fled the Somali Civil War in the early 1990s and spent almost 20 years in a refugee camp in Kenya. That’s where she was born.

Hamud remembers crying when her family left the only home she knew to come to the U.S. in 2009. Her family was among 98 refugees from Somalia to resettle in Boise, Idaho, that year — and hundreds more Somali refugees have since resettled since the mid-2000s.

Hamud started school in Boise as a fourth grader at Whitney Elementary and took several years to learn English.

“I didn’t even know how to do math — adding and subtracting — because I was so focused on the environment,” she said. “I was being bullied, sometimes I was the only girl wearing a hijab in the class. … Kids are ruthless sometimes.”

She began to wear jeans and take off her hijab at school.

“I did fit in, but it was at a very high cost, because it wasn’t me,” she says. “I was doing something that deep in my heart I didn’t want to do, just to fit in.”

The harassment didn’t end with childhood; the bullies just got older. Recently, someone called her the “N word” while she was shopping.

“Being a Black Muslim woman in Idaho is just very difficult,” she said, but chose to focus instead on “what this city and this community can do for you.”

She pointed to Idaho’s refugee-focused nonprofits and Boise’s large refugee community. She credited them, and two teachers (“Miss Robin” and “Miss Rowe”) with helping her find her place.

Hamud plans to graduate from Boise State University next May. This year, she was the fifth BSU student to win the prestigious Harry S. Truman Scholarship.

Arnobia Bernal Ramirez, 57, Colombia

Alone and afraid of being followed by a dangerous Colombian group, Arnobia Bernal Ramirez isolated herself from the world when she arrived in Baltimore in 2019. She’s since found community with other refugees through Asylee Women Enterprise. Photo by Hannah Gaskill/Maryland Matters.

By Hannah Gaskill | Maryland Matters

Maryland was home to 763 refugees in 2019, and one of them was Arnobia Bernal Ramirez, 57. 

Bernal Ramirez fled Colombia to Ecuador with her son, who has a cognitive disability, in 2016 after she was exploited and threatened by a local group. Unable to escape the danger, Bernal Ramirez applied for asylum in the U.S.

As a Spanish speaker, she spoke to Maryland Matters through Andrea Sanchez, an intern at Asylee Women Enterprise, a Baltimore organization that helps asylum seekers.

“She did live a bit of a calm life [in Ecuador] for a while, but [the harassers] ended up following her there,” Sanchez said. 

Through tears, Bernal Ramirez said she felt alone when she arrived in Baltimore and was constantly paranoid that she and her son would be discovered.

“She was constantly living in fear that one day those people would find her, recognize her and her son on the street and kill [them],” said Sanchez.

Unable to speak English or communicate with her 35-year-old nonverbal son, Andres Bernal Ramirez hid from the world for months until she connected with Asylee Women Enterprise (AWE), where she found support and a job.

“At first she was very reluctant,” said Sanchez. “She felt as if she wasn’t worthy of getting help or any resources.”

But Bernal Ramirez said crossing the threshold at AWE felt like learning “what it was to live again.” 

And while some people can be “hateful,” Bernal Ramirez admires the community she’s found.

“She doesn’t really even think the stereotypes [of immigrants] matter just because of the sheer amount of people that do actually care … and think that immigrants are worthy of being here,” Sanchez said.

Alex Mutabazi, 45, Democratic Republic of Congo


Alex Mutabazi and his family came to Tennessee to escape the violence in Central Africa. He has since started a church to help other refugees. Photo by John Partipilo/Tennessee Lookout.

By Dulce Torres | Tennessee Lookout

Alex Mutabazi, 45, lost everything during the yearslong violence that spread through much of Central Africa.
After the 1994 Rwandan genocide that killed millions, millions more fled to the Democratic Republic of Congo in order to escape. Among the refugees were rebel groups, which prompted an invasion of Congo, resulting in widespread destruction.

Among the chaos, Mutabazi, his wife, seven children and extended family struggled to survive. Among the victims of the war was his mother, and after losing his property and livestock, the family had nowhere to go. 

“I could not eat when my family could not eat and were dying,” he said. 

A peace treaty was signed in 2003, but conflicts continued into the next decade. In 2016, Mutabazi and his family migrated to Tennessee into the political turmoil that comes from changing presidential administrations. 

Mutabazi’s family was one of 2,051 that migrated that year to Tennessee, most being from Congo, Iraq, Syria and Somalia. Advocates helped them resettle, but refugees still struggled with discrimination due to language barriers and limited knowledge about local laws.

Seeing this, Mutabazi founded a church, called His Grace Christian Life Church, so the community could gather, worship in their own language and discuss the problems affecting them in their daily lives. 

By August of this year, Mutabazi and his family will have been in the U.S. for five years and hope they will soon be able to start the process of becoming American citizens. Mutabazi has founded two churches in Nashville and Knoxville and has 155 members. 

With another child on the way, Mutabazi knows the struggles of being a refugee hundreds of miles away from their homeland and hopes Joe Biden’s administration will fulfill his campaign promises to facilitate admission to the U.S.

“Life in Africa is so tough because of many reasons. Right now, in my country, they are having a war,” said Mutabazi.  “I wish my four brothers will be able to join us here, because where they are now, they are not safe.”

Manasse Matala, 19, Zimbabwe

By Noah Taborda | Kansas Reflector

Manasse Matala, 19, endeavors each day to ensure he does not waste the educational opportunities available to him in the United States.

Matala and his family resettled in Wichita, one of an estimated 3.4 million Zimbabweans who have fled their home country to escape violence and killings. Kansas’s culture came as quite a shock, especially for someone whose English was shaky.

Through his studies, Matala said he overcame many of those language barriers. Still, the lack of fluency did affect his French-speaking family.

“My mom didn’t know how to speak English and it would be very hard for her to communicate or to find something like a job,” he said.

Now, Matala is hoping to bring inspiration and hope to more refugees through, of all things, speaking. He graduated from Southeast High School in May, and while he plans to pursue a degree in pre-medicine, he also wants to be a motivational speaker.

His message is a tried and true one — hard work pays off. Matala channels his own personal experience from things as difficult as overcoming language barriers to learning piano or playing soccer to demonstrate this.

He has also considered physical therapy as a possible career path. Whatever directions he takes, he wants to dispel misconceptions that refugees are a burden on their new country.

“I asked some of my friends about what you think about refugees, and everyone is telling me this bad stuff. I didn’t show my sadness, but it did break my heart a little,” Matala said. “We can’t just come in and start acting without even knowing the culture. We don’t even know what is going on.”

Minnesota Reformer is part of States Newsroom, a network of news outlets supported by grants and a coalition of donors as a 501c(3) public charity. Minnesota Reformer maintains editorial independence. Contact Editor Patrick Coolican for questions: info@minnesotareformer.com. Follow Minnesota Reformer on Facebook and Twitter.


originally published in the minnesotareformer.com

The post Settled into new homes, refugees in US say they are working for a better life for all first appeared on Minnesota Minutes." ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1624281750) } [6]=> array(12) { ["title"]=> string(75) "Monday Informer: Nicollet County offers walk-in vaccinations | Mankato News" ["link"]=> string(65) "http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/minnesotanewsdaily/~3/JKO2CfU2QZc/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(15) "Dexter Peterson" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Mon, 21 Jun 2021 13:10:51 +0000" ["category"]=> string(7) "Mankato" ["guid"]=> string(36) "https://minnesotaminutes.com/?p=6602" ["description"]=> string(1488) "
Monday Informer: Nicollet County offers walk-in vaccinations | Mankato News

The free press Nicollet County’s Health and Social Services will begin offering regular visiting hours at the clinic to make it easier for people to get vaccinated against COVID-19. Starting today, people aged 18 and over can visit the St. Peter HHS building, 622 S. Front St. No appointments are required for the walk-in clinics, […]

The post Monday Informer: Nicollet County offers walk-in vaccinations | Mankato News first appeared on Minnesota Minutes." ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(4123) "
Monday Informer: Nicollet County offers walk-in vaccinations | Mankato News

The free press

Nicollet County’s Health and Social Services will begin offering regular visiting hours at the clinic to make it easier for people to get vaccinated against COVID-19.

Starting today, people aged 18 and over can visit the St. Peter HHS building, 622 S. Front St.

No appointments are required for the walk-in clinics, which are available until July 31. The recordings are free.

“We want everyone to get vaccinated as quickly and conveniently as possible. Because of this, we’re giving our community a recurring vaccination opportunity, ”said Kate Albrecht, public health nurse, in a HHS press release.

Discussing Hispanic Outreach

An outreach program to support the Hispanic community is the topic of the next VINE Faith in Action community meeting, Tuesday at 2 p.m. at the community center, 421 E. Hickory St.

A representative of VINE’s diversity program, Lourdes Menjivar, will discuss services that help members of the local Hispanic community navigate American culture.

To sign up or for more information call 387-1666.

Other activities this week at the VINE Adult Community Center include a presentation by Mapleton author Jason Lee Willis at 2pm today. His recently self-published novel is entitled “The Alchemist’s Card”. Registration is required.

A new art exhibition by 14 VINE members is on view in the Fifth Floor Gallery in the center through July 28th. Admission is free. The exhibition times are on weekdays from 7.30 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Auto show in Mankato. planned

Mankato Area Meets and Cruises Autoshow cruise 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday at Wickersham Health Campus, 1421 Premier Drive, is a perk for ECHO Food Shelf and BENCHS Animal Shelter.

Visitors can view a variety of makes and models of classic and modern automobiles, articulated trucks, motorcycles, and trucks. The $ 10 entry fee should be tied to a non-perishable food item that will be donated to the grocery shelf.

Live music and giveaways are planned during the show.

Tickets can be bought at the gate and online at: eventbrite.com/e/mankato-area-meets-and-cruises-independence-day-show-tickets-151974567021.

Art scholarship offers

The Prairie Lakes Regional Arts Council provides nine-county grants for artists, as well as nonprofit arts organizations, community groups, and schools that sponsor arts-related activities.

Art disciplines eligible for the scholarships include dance, literature, media art, music, theater, visual arts, folk art, and traditional art.

The next application deadlines are: July 1st: Small Arts Community Project, School Arts Project; August 1: Art and Heritage Scholarship; September 1: artist grant.

Further information or workshop videos can be found at: www.plrac.org. For more information, call 800-298-1254 or email an inquiry to: plrac@hickorytech.net.

The post Monday Informer: Nicollet County offers walk-in vaccinations | Mankato News first appeared on Minnesota Minutes." } ["feedburner"]=> array(1) { ["origlink"]=> string(102) "https://minnesotaminutes.com/monday-informer-nicollet-county-offers-walk-in-vaccinations-mankato-news/" } ["summary"]=> string(1488) "
Monday Informer: Nicollet County offers walk-in vaccinations | Mankato News

The free press Nicollet County’s Health and Social Services will begin offering regular visiting hours at the clinic to make it easier for people to get vaccinated against COVID-19. Starting today, people aged 18 and over can visit the St. Peter HHS building, 622 S. Front St. No appointments are required for the walk-in clinics, […]

The post Monday Informer: Nicollet County offers walk-in vaccinations | Mankato News first appeared on Minnesota Minutes." ["atom_content"]=> string(4123) "
Monday Informer: Nicollet County offers walk-in vaccinations | Mankato News

The free press

Nicollet County’s Health and Social Services will begin offering regular visiting hours at the clinic to make it easier for people to get vaccinated against COVID-19.

Starting today, people aged 18 and over can visit the St. Peter HHS building, 622 S. Front St.

No appointments are required for the walk-in clinics, which are available until July 31. The recordings are free.

“We want everyone to get vaccinated as quickly and conveniently as possible. Because of this, we’re giving our community a recurring vaccination opportunity, ”said Kate Albrecht, public health nurse, in a HHS press release.

Discussing Hispanic Outreach

An outreach program to support the Hispanic community is the topic of the next VINE Faith in Action community meeting, Tuesday at 2 p.m. at the community center, 421 E. Hickory St.

A representative of VINE’s diversity program, Lourdes Menjivar, will discuss services that help members of the local Hispanic community navigate American culture.

To sign up or for more information call 387-1666.

Other activities this week at the VINE Adult Community Center include a presentation by Mapleton author Jason Lee Willis at 2pm today. His recently self-published novel is entitled “The Alchemist’s Card”. Registration is required.

A new art exhibition by 14 VINE members is on view in the Fifth Floor Gallery in the center through July 28th. Admission is free. The exhibition times are on weekdays from 7.30 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Auto show in Mankato. planned

Mankato Area Meets and Cruises Autoshow cruise 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday at Wickersham Health Campus, 1421 Premier Drive, is a perk for ECHO Food Shelf and BENCHS Animal Shelter.

Visitors can view a variety of makes and models of classic and modern automobiles, articulated trucks, motorcycles, and trucks. The $ 10 entry fee should be tied to a non-perishable food item that will be donated to the grocery shelf.

Live music and giveaways are planned during the show.

Tickets can be bought at the gate and online at: eventbrite.com/e/mankato-area-meets-and-cruises-independence-day-show-tickets-151974567021.

Art scholarship offers

The Prairie Lakes Regional Arts Council provides nine-county grants for artists, as well as nonprofit arts organizations, community groups, and schools that sponsor arts-related activities.

Art disciplines eligible for the scholarships include dance, literature, media art, music, theater, visual arts, folk art, and traditional art.

The next application deadlines are: July 1st: Small Arts Community Project, School Arts Project; August 1: Art and Heritage Scholarship; September 1: artist grant.

Further information or workshop videos can be found at: www.plrac.org. For more information, call 800-298-1254 or email an inquiry to: plrac@hickorytech.net.

The post Monday Informer: Nicollet County offers walk-in vaccinations | Mankato News first appeared on Minnesota Minutes." ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1624281051) } [7]=> array(12) { ["title"]=> string(83) "SWP’s practical turning point work benefits from the region | News, sports, jobs" ["link"]=> string(65) "http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/minnesotanewsdaily/~3/jaxAXhFtQq0/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(15) "Dexter Peterson" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Mon, 21 Jun 2021 12:46:33 +0000" ["category"]=> string(6) "Duluth" ["guid"]=> string(36) "https://minnesotaminutes.com/?p=6599" ["description"]=> string(1425) "
SWP's practical turning point work benefits from the region |  News, sports, jobs

There’s nothing like listening to the waters of Lake Superior on an early summer morning. However, the gentle sound of the waves of the large lake is only a small part of what our region has to offer. It is a treasure that we appreciate because it offers fresh water, living space, beauty, leisure opportunities […]

The post SWP’s practical turning point work benefits from the region | News, sports, jobs first appeared on Minnesota Minutes." ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(4377) "
SWP's practical turning point work benefits from the region |  News, sports, jobs

There’s nothing like listening to the waters of Lake Superior on an early summer morning. However, the gentle sound of the waves of the large lake is only a small part of what our region has to offer. It is a treasure that we appreciate because it offers fresh water, living space, beauty, leisure opportunities and much more.

In addition, the well-being of the Lake Superior watershed is inextricably and inextricably linked to the well-being of the people, plants, animals, ecosystems, and societies surrounding its waters. This results in an enormous responsibility for everyone who lives in these waters, and right here in Marquette we have an organization that has taken on this enormous task again and again, the Superior Watershed Partnership.

SWP, a Marquette-based nonprofit, received the Lake Superior Magazine 2020 Achievement Award during a ceremony in Marquette in Presque Isle Park, overlooking Lake Superior.

Awarded by Konnie LeMay, editor of Duluth, Minnesota-based magazine, the award has been presented annually since 1994 to individuals or organizations who have made significant contributions to the well-being of Lake Superior and its people.

“They are the Swiss Army Knife of the organizations because they have mastered so many different areas, handle them well and with practical functionality.” LeMay said about the SWP.

The SWP has benefited the Marquette community, she noted, but it has also helped the Lake Superior community expand its scope to other Great Lakes.

We totally agree. The scope of the work of the SWP impresses us again and again here in the journal, because the 22-year-old SWP cooperates on projects on all four banks of Lake Superior as well as on Lakes Michigan and Huron. His projects focused on the protection and restoration of habitats such as planting beach grass and milkweed near the lake shore, protecting the environment, planning and implementing adaptation to climate change, removal and prevention of invasive species, and water quality rainwater management. It has helped low-income families with energy bills and is running fundraising campaigns to restore the Stannard Rock Lighthouse, among other things.

The scope of the SGP’s efforts – and most importantly its practical approach to carrying out the “real work” in the area’s watershed – make this organization an invaluable part of our community, our watershed and our region.

The SWP is an amazing example of how a single, dedicated, nonprofit organization can benefit so many lives – humans, plants and animals – by protecting our watersheds and ecosystems through a wide range of interconnected and complementary approaches. We commend the SWP and all of its staff, volunteers and crew for making a real difference every day in many lives in many watersheds.

We hope readers will consider volunteering, donating, or otherwise supporting this organization as it is a shining example of how people protect and give something to the land and waters that have sustained us for generations can return.

Get the latest news and more in your inbox

The post SWP’s practical turning point work benefits from the region | News, sports, jobs first appeared on Minnesota Minutes." } ["feedburner"]=> array(1) { ["origlink"]=> string(105) "https://minnesotaminutes.com/swps-practical-turning-point-work-benefits-from-the-region-news-sports-jobs/" } ["summary"]=> string(1425) "
SWP's practical turning point work benefits from the region |  News, sports, jobs

There’s nothing like listening to the waters of Lake Superior on an early summer morning. However, the gentle sound of the waves of the large lake is only a small part of what our region has to offer. It is a treasure that we appreciate because it offers fresh water, living space, beauty, leisure opportunities […]

The post SWP’s practical turning point work benefits from the region | News, sports, jobs first appeared on Minnesota Minutes." ["atom_content"]=> string(4377) "
SWP's practical turning point work benefits from the region |  News, sports, jobs

There’s nothing like listening to the waters of Lake Superior on an early summer morning. However, the gentle sound of the waves of the large lake is only a small part of what our region has to offer. It is a treasure that we appreciate because it offers fresh water, living space, beauty, leisure opportunities and much more.

In addition, the well-being of the Lake Superior watershed is inextricably and inextricably linked to the well-being of the people, plants, animals, ecosystems, and societies surrounding its waters. This results in an enormous responsibility for everyone who lives in these waters, and right here in Marquette we have an organization that has taken on this enormous task again and again, the Superior Watershed Partnership.

SWP, a Marquette-based nonprofit, received the Lake Superior Magazine 2020 Achievement Award during a ceremony in Marquette in Presque Isle Park, overlooking Lake Superior.

Awarded by Konnie LeMay, editor of Duluth, Minnesota-based magazine, the award has been presented annually since 1994 to individuals or organizations who have made significant contributions to the well-being of Lake Superior and its people.

“They are the Swiss Army Knife of the organizations because they have mastered so many different areas, handle them well and with practical functionality.” LeMay said about the SWP.

The SWP has benefited the Marquette community, she noted, but it has also helped the Lake Superior community expand its scope to other Great Lakes.

We totally agree. The scope of the work of the SWP impresses us again and again here in the journal, because the 22-year-old SWP cooperates on projects on all four banks of Lake Superior as well as on Lakes Michigan and Huron. His projects focused on the protection and restoration of habitats such as planting beach grass and milkweed near the lake shore, protecting the environment, planning and implementing adaptation to climate change, removal and prevention of invasive species, and water quality rainwater management. It has helped low-income families with energy bills and is running fundraising campaigns to restore the Stannard Rock Lighthouse, among other things.

The scope of the SGP’s efforts – and most importantly its practical approach to carrying out the “real work” in the area’s watershed – make this organization an invaluable part of our community, our watershed and our region.

The SWP is an amazing example of how a single, dedicated, nonprofit organization can benefit so many lives – humans, plants and animals – by protecting our watersheds and ecosystems through a wide range of interconnected and complementary approaches. We commend the SWP and all of its staff, volunteers and crew for making a real difference every day in many lives in many watersheds.

We hope readers will consider volunteering, donating, or otherwise supporting this organization as it is a shining example of how people protect and give something to the land and waters that have sustained us for generations can return.

Get the latest news and more in your inbox

The post SWP’s practical turning point work benefits from the region | News, sports, jobs first appeared on Minnesota Minutes." ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1624279593) } [8]=> array(12) { ["title"]=> string(66) "St. Cloud homeowners killed in “accidental” attack, police say" ["link"]=> string(65) "http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/minnesotanewsdaily/~3/05ZzgX3HQNk/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(15) "Dexter Peterson" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Mon, 21 Jun 2021 11:02:44 +0000" ["category"]=> string(9) "St. Cloud" ["guid"]=> string(36) "https://minnesotaminutes.com/?p=6596" ["description"]=> string(1667) "
St. Cloud homeowners killed in "accidental" attack, police say

04:30 weather reportMeteorologist Riley O’Connor says Monday will be breezy and cool, with temperatures only hitting the top 60s (3:40). WCCO this morning – June 21, 2021 50 minutes ago WCCO Digital Update: Tomorrow June 21, 2021Here are the latest headlines from Minnesota (1:00 am). WCCO 4 News – June 21, 2021 53 minutes ago […]

The post St. Cloud homeowners killed in “accidental” attack, police say first appeared on Minnesota Minutes." ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(12910) "
St. Cloud homeowners killed in "accidental" attack, police say

04:30 weather reportMeteorologist Riley O’Connor says Monday will be breezy and cool, with temperatures only hitting the top 60s (3:40). WCCO this morning – June 21, 2021

50 minutes ago

WCCO Digital Update: Tomorrow June 21, 2021Here are the latest headlines from Minnesota (1:00 am). WCCO 4 News – June 21, 2021

53 minutes ago

Epimonia partners with Minnesota UnitedTwo entrepreneurs have partnered with Minnesota United Football Club to co-brand apparel to help refugees living here in Minnesota, reports Norman Seawright (3:27). WCCO 4 News from June 10th to 20th, 2021

7 hours ago

10 p.m. weather reportGet ready to cool off, reports Lisa Meadows (3:18). WCCO 4 News from June 10th to 20th, 2021

7 hours ago

How brands increase their representation in marketingRepresentation in marketing has always been a hot topic, but perhaps now more than ever. Not just in the Pride month of June, but some companies are completely changing their strategies. Jeff Wagner talks to local marketer Giselle Ugarte about how these brands are doing (6:39). WCCO 4 News from June 10th to 20th, 2021

7 hours ago

Possible Approaches to Shutting Down the Minnesota GovernmentThe Minnesota Legislature has 10 days to do all 15 household bills or the state government closes. And unlike previous closings, this one would be more severe because agencies that were allowed to get funding cannot, reports Esme Murphy (2:01). WCCO 4 News from June 10th to 20th, 2021

7 hours ago

Minnesota Vixen is gearing up for playoffsThe Minnesota Vixen have just finished their Women’s Football Alliance schedule unbeaten, reports Norman Seawright (2:27). WCCO 4 News from June 10th to 20th, 2021

7 hours ago

Runners finished Grandma’s marathon months after the transplantA man from Minneapolis did a remarkable job this weekend in Duluth, reports David Schuman (2:09). WCCO 4 News from June 10th to 20th, 2021

7 hours ago

Pedestrian, 21, killed in Brooklyn ParkWe now also know the name of the young man who was killed while walking in Brooklyn Park (0:12). WCCO 4 News from June 10th to 20th, 2021

7 hours ago

Man who died in Mtka. Water tower ID’dInvestigators reveal what happened in a water tower just before a man died (0:17). WCCO 4 News from June 10th to 20th, 2021

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St. Cloud homeowners killed in “accidental” attack, police saySt. Cloud Police believe that a man accidentally killed someone in a house on Sunday morning (12:31 am). WCCO 4 News from June 10th to 20th, 2021

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Digital update on the WCCO evening: June 20, 2021Jeff Wagner has your latest headlines (1:34). WCCO 4 News – June 20, 2021

12 hours ago

Woman survives encounter with Alaskan bearsLauren Maxwell tells the story that made people across Alaska hope for a miracle (2:15). WCCO 4 News at 5:30 am – June 20, 2021

12 hours ago

5:30 p.m. weather reportHeavy storms sweep through southeast Minnesota and west Wisconsin Sunday night, Lisa Meadows reported (3:54). WCCO 4 News at 5:30 am – June 20, 2021

12 hours ago

Clay target shooters prepare for the state meetingThis week, the state high school sand target meeting is due, a sport that demands a little more from its competitors, reports Norman Seawright (2:42). WCCO 4 News at 5:30 am – June 20, 2021

12 hours ago

Ugly Father’s Day 5K Tie in Mpls.Hundreds of people in the Twin Cities have started their Father’s Day off! (1:24) WCCO 4 News at 5:30 am – June 20, 2021

12 hours ago

Twin Cities Pride Homestay Fun DayComo Park in St. Paul hosted a day of music, food, fun and pride on Sunday (0:45 am). WCCO 4 News at 5:30 am – June 20, 2021

12 hours ago

10 days left in the special sessionThe Minnesota House eventually passed three budget laws (0:42). WCCO 4 News at 5:30 am – June 20, 2021

12 hours ago

George Floyd Square, Uptown Intersection reopened to trafficTwo Minneapolis intersections that have been the center of gatherings and protests are currently open to traffic again (1:23). WCCO 4 News at 5:30 am – June 20, 2021

12 hours ago

Fire breaks out at St. Paul’s Sanneh FoundationEarly on Sunday morning (12:24 a.m.) the building of a non-profit organization owned by Twin Cities burned down. WCCO 4 News at 5:30 am – June 20, 2021

12 hours ago

Stone Arch Bridge Festival returns in post-mask mandate Mpls.Marielle Mohs explains why the return of one of Minneapolis’ biggest festivals makes sense (1:44). WCCO 4 News at 5:30 am – June 20, 2021

12 hours ago

11 a.m. weather reportThere is an increasing risk of severe weather in southern Minnesota on Sunday afternoon, reports Mike Augustyniak (4:05 a.m.). WCCO Sunday morning – June 20, 2021

19 hours ago

Interview: Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey on civil unrestEsme Murphy spoke to Mayor Jacob Frey as the city continues to deal with civil unrest (6:20). WCCO Sunday morning – June 20, 2021

19 hours ago

Interview: Kurt Daudt, parliamentary group leader of the House of Representatives, on the progress of the special sessionsEsme Murphy spoke to Rep. Kurt Daudt while lawmakers continued to work on the state budget (5:13). WCCO Sunday morning – June 20, 2021

19 hours ago

The post St. Cloud homeowners killed in “accidental” attack, police say first appeared on Minnesota Minutes." } ["feedburner"]=> array(1) { ["origlink"]=> string(88) "https://minnesotaminutes.com/st-cloud-homeowners-killed-in-accidental-attack-police-say/" } ["summary"]=> string(1667) "
St. Cloud homeowners killed in "accidental" attack, police say

04:30 weather reportMeteorologist Riley O’Connor says Monday will be breezy and cool, with temperatures only hitting the top 60s (3:40). WCCO this morning – June 21, 2021 50 minutes ago WCCO Digital Update: Tomorrow June 21, 2021Here are the latest headlines from Minnesota (1:00 am). WCCO 4 News – June 21, 2021 53 minutes ago […]

The post St. Cloud homeowners killed in “accidental” attack, police say first appeared on Minnesota Minutes." ["atom_content"]=> string(12910) "
St. Cloud homeowners killed in "accidental" attack, police say

04:30 weather reportMeteorologist Riley O’Connor says Monday will be breezy and cool, with temperatures only hitting the top 60s (3:40). WCCO this morning – June 21, 2021

50 minutes ago

WCCO Digital Update: Tomorrow June 21, 2021Here are the latest headlines from Minnesota (1:00 am). WCCO 4 News – June 21, 2021

53 minutes ago

Epimonia partners with Minnesota UnitedTwo entrepreneurs have partnered with Minnesota United Football Club to co-brand apparel to help refugees living here in Minnesota, reports Norman Seawright (3:27). WCCO 4 News from June 10th to 20th, 2021

7 hours ago

10 p.m. weather reportGet ready to cool off, reports Lisa Meadows (3:18). WCCO 4 News from June 10th to 20th, 2021

7 hours ago

How brands increase their representation in marketingRepresentation in marketing has always been a hot topic, but perhaps now more than ever. Not just in the Pride month of June, but some companies are completely changing their strategies. Jeff Wagner talks to local marketer Giselle Ugarte about how these brands are doing (6:39). WCCO 4 News from June 10th to 20th, 2021

7 hours ago

Possible Approaches to Shutting Down the Minnesota GovernmentThe Minnesota Legislature has 10 days to do all 15 household bills or the state government closes. And unlike previous closings, this one would be more severe because agencies that were allowed to get funding cannot, reports Esme Murphy (2:01). WCCO 4 News from June 10th to 20th, 2021

7 hours ago

Minnesota Vixen is gearing up for playoffsThe Minnesota Vixen have just finished their Women’s Football Alliance schedule unbeaten, reports Norman Seawright (2:27). WCCO 4 News from June 10th to 20th, 2021

7 hours ago

Runners finished Grandma’s marathon months after the transplantA man from Minneapolis did a remarkable job this weekend in Duluth, reports David Schuman (2:09). WCCO 4 News from June 10th to 20th, 2021

7 hours ago

Pedestrian, 21, killed in Brooklyn ParkWe now also know the name of the young man who was killed while walking in Brooklyn Park (0:12). WCCO 4 News from June 10th to 20th, 2021

7 hours ago

Man who died in Mtka. Water tower ID’dInvestigators reveal what happened in a water tower just before a man died (0:17). WCCO 4 News from June 10th to 20th, 2021

7 hours ago

St. Cloud homeowners killed in “accidental” attack, police saySt. Cloud Police believe that a man accidentally killed someone in a house on Sunday morning (12:31 am). WCCO 4 News from June 10th to 20th, 2021

7 hours ago

Digital update on the WCCO evening: June 20, 2021Jeff Wagner has your latest headlines (1:34). WCCO 4 News – June 20, 2021

12 hours ago

Woman survives encounter with Alaskan bearsLauren Maxwell tells the story that made people across Alaska hope for a miracle (2:15). WCCO 4 News at 5:30 am – June 20, 2021

12 hours ago

5:30 p.m. weather reportHeavy storms sweep through southeast Minnesota and west Wisconsin Sunday night, Lisa Meadows reported (3:54). WCCO 4 News at 5:30 am – June 20, 2021

12 hours ago

Clay target shooters prepare for the state meetingThis week, the state high school sand target meeting is due, a sport that demands a little more from its competitors, reports Norman Seawright (2:42). WCCO 4 News at 5:30 am – June 20, 2021

12 hours ago

Ugly Father’s Day 5K Tie in Mpls.Hundreds of people in the Twin Cities have started their Father’s Day off! (1:24) WCCO 4 News at 5:30 am – June 20, 2021

12 hours ago

Twin Cities Pride Homestay Fun DayComo Park in St. Paul hosted a day of music, food, fun and pride on Sunday (0:45 am). WCCO 4 News at 5:30 am – June 20, 2021

12 hours ago

10 days left in the special sessionThe Minnesota House eventually passed three budget laws (0:42). WCCO 4 News at 5:30 am – June 20, 2021

12 hours ago

George Floyd Square, Uptown Intersection reopened to trafficTwo Minneapolis intersections that have been the center of gatherings and protests are currently open to traffic again (1:23). WCCO 4 News at 5:30 am – June 20, 2021

12 hours ago

Fire breaks out at St. Paul’s Sanneh FoundationEarly on Sunday morning (12:24 a.m.) the building of a non-profit organization owned by Twin Cities burned down. WCCO 4 News at 5:30 am – June 20, 2021

12 hours ago

Stone Arch Bridge Festival returns in post-mask mandate Mpls.Marielle Mohs explains why the return of one of Minneapolis’ biggest festivals makes sense (1:44). WCCO 4 News at 5:30 am – June 20, 2021

12 hours ago

11 a.m. weather reportThere is an increasing risk of severe weather in southern Minnesota on Sunday afternoon, reports Mike Augustyniak (4:05 a.m.). WCCO Sunday morning – June 20, 2021

19 hours ago

Interview: Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey on civil unrestEsme Murphy spoke to Mayor Jacob Frey as the city continues to deal with civil unrest (6:20). WCCO Sunday morning – June 20, 2021

19 hours ago

Interview: Kurt Daudt, parliamentary group leader of the House of Representatives, on the progress of the special sessionsEsme Murphy spoke to Rep. Kurt Daudt while lawmakers continued to work on the state budget (5:13). WCCO Sunday morning – June 20, 2021

19 hours ago

The post St. Cloud homeowners killed in “accidental” attack, police say first appeared on Minnesota Minutes." ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1624273364) } [9]=> array(12) { ["title"]=> string(70) "Stanford’s New Open-Source Software for Designing Sustainable Cities" ["link"]=> string(65) "http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/minnesotanewsdaily/~3/Qxohe736PwU/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(15) "Dexter Peterson" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Mon, 21 Jun 2021 10:16:15 +0000" ["category"]=> string(20) "Minneapolis-St. Paul" ["guid"]=> string(36) "https://minnesotaminutes.com/?p=6593" ["description"]=> string(1533) "
Big City Park

New technologies could help cities around the world improve people’s lives while saving billions of dollars. The free, open source software developed by the Stanford Natural Capital Project creates maps to visualize the connections between nature and human wellbeing. Urban planners and builders can use the software to visualize where investing in nature, such as […]

The post Stanford’s New Open-Source Software for Designing Sustainable Cities first appeared on Minnesota Minutes." ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(9097) "
Big City Park

New technologies could help cities around the world improve people’s lives while saving billions of dollars. The free, open source software developed by the Stanford Natural Capital Project creates maps to visualize the connections between nature and human wellbeing. Urban planners and builders can use the software to visualize where investing in nature, such as parks and marshland, can maximize benefits for people, e.g. B. Protection from floods and improved health.

“This software helps design cities that are better for both people and nature,” said Anne Guerry, chief strategy officer and lead scientist at the Natural Capital Project. “Urban nature is a multitasking benefactor – the trees in your street can bring the temperature down, making your home cooler on hot summer days. At the same time, they soak up the carbon emissions that cause climate change, create a free, accessible place to stay healthy through physical activity, and simply make your city more enjoyable. “


Urban InVEST is free, open source software that creates maps to show city planners and developers where investing in nature can maximize benefits for people. The software was developed by the Natural Capital Project. Photo credits: Video: Talia K. Trepte, Footage: Pexels.com, Music: “Stay with me” by Michael Ramir C.

By 2050, experts expect that over 70 percent of the world’s population will live in cities – in the USA this is already more than 80 percent. As the global community becomes more urban, builders and city planners are increasingly interested in green infrastructure such as tree-lined paths and community gardens that offer people a stream of benefits. But if planners don’t have detailed information about where a pathway will encourage most people to exercise, or how a community garden will protect a neighborhood from flood risks while helping people relax mentally, they cannot invest strategically in nature.

“With this software we answer three crucial questions: Where in a city does nature offer what benefits for people, how much of each benefit does it bring and who receives these benefits?” Said Perrine Hamel, lead author of a new article about the software that was published at the time of research in the Stanford Natural Capital Project’s Urban Sustainability and Livable Cities Program.

The software called Urban InVEST is the first of its kind for cities and enables the combination of environmental data such as temperature patterns with social demographics and economic data such as income levels. Users can enter their city’s records into the software or access a variety of open global data sources, from NASA satellites to local weather stations. The new software complements the existing InVEST software suite of the Natural Capital Project, a set of tools developed for experts to map and model the benefits of nature for humans.

To test Urban InVEST, the team deployed the software in several cities around the world: Paris, France; Lausanne, Switzerland; Shenzhen and Guangzhou, China; and several US cities, including San Francisco and Minneapolis. In many cases, they worked with local partners to understand priority issues – in Paris, candidates for a local election campaigned for the need for urban greening, while in Minneapolis, planners decided to recycle unused golf course land.

Let the numbers run

In Shenzhen, China, the researchers used Urban InVEST to calculate how natural infrastructures such as parks, grassland and forests would reduce damage in the event of a severe storm that occurs only once in a hundred years. They found that the city’s nature would help prevent $ 25 billion in damage by sucking up rain and diverting floods. They also showed that natural infrastructure – like trees and parks – lowered the daily air temperature in Shenzhen by 5.4 degrees Fahrenheit (3 degrees Celsius) on hot summer days, giving the city $ 71,000 a day in benefits.

Alignment with imbalances

Nature is often unevenly distributed across cities – which puts people on low incomes at a disadvantage. The data shows that low-income and marginalized urban communities often have less access to nature, meaning they are unable to reap the benefits nature offers to wealthier populations, such as improved mental and physical health.

In Paris, the researchers examined neighborhoods with no access to natural areas and overlaid income and economic data to understand who benefits from nature. The software helped determine where investing in more green spaces – like parks and bike lanes – could be most effective in promoting health and wellbeing in an equitable manner.

Planning for a greener future

In Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota region, golf revenues are declining. The downturn has created an attractive opportunity for private golf courses to sell their land for development. But should developers create a new park or build a new neighborhood? Urban InVEST showed how compared to golf courses new parks can increase urban cooling, keep river water clean, support bee pollinators and preserve dwindling biodiversity. New housing developments, on the other hand, would raise temperatures, pollute fresh water and reduce the habitat for bees and other biodiversity.

Healthy urban ecosystems

Urban InVEST is already being used outside a research setting – it recently contributed to an assessment of how nature could contribute to carbon storage and lower temperatures in 775 European cities.

“Cities are designed by people more than any other ecosystem. Why not think about how we design the places where most of us spend our time? ”Said Guerry, also a writer on paper. “With Urban InVEST, city administrations can offer residents and visitors all the advantages of nature. They can eliminate inequalities and build more resilient cities, which leads to better long-term outcomes for people and nature. “

Reference: June 21, 2021, Urban Sustainability.
DOI: 10.1038 / s42949-021-00027-9

Anne Guerry is also a Senior Research Associate at the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment. Gretchen Daily, Bing Professor of Environmental Science at Stanford School of Humanities and Sciences, Senior Fellow at Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment, and co-founder of the Stanford Natural Capital Project, is lead author of the article. Other Stanford Natural Capital authors at the time of research include James Douglass, Roy Remme, and Richard Sharp. Remme is now at Leiden University and Sharp leads the Spring Research Innovation Network Group. Perrine Hamel is now at Nanyang Technological University’s Asian School of Environment.

Other authors come from the University of Minnesota Institute on the Environment, Stellenbosch University, Stockholm Resilience Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, AgroParisTech, The Nature Conservancy, INRAE ​​and CIRED.

This work was supported by the Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the LuEsther Mertz Charitable Trust, the Winslow Foundation, the United States Golf Association, the World Bank, FORMAS, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the French Ministry, Nanyang Technological University and individual donors to the Stanford Natural Capital Project and the Center for Conservation Biology.

The post Stanford’s New Open-Source Software for Designing Sustainable Cities first appeared on Minnesota Minutes." } ["feedburner"]=> array(1) { ["origlink"]=> string(97) "https://minnesotaminutes.com/stanfords-new-open-source-software-for-designing-sustainable-cities/" } ["summary"]=> string(1533) "
Big City Park

New technologies could help cities around the world improve people’s lives while saving billions of dollars. The free, open source software developed by the Stanford Natural Capital Project creates maps to visualize the connections between nature and human wellbeing. Urban planners and builders can use the software to visualize where investing in nature, such as […]

The post Stanford’s New Open-Source Software for Designing Sustainable Cities first appeared on Minnesota Minutes." ["atom_content"]=> string(9097) "
Big City Park

New technologies could help cities around the world improve people’s lives while saving billions of dollars. The free, open source software developed by the Stanford Natural Capital Project creates maps to visualize the connections between nature and human wellbeing. Urban planners and builders can use the software to visualize where investing in nature, such as parks and marshland, can maximize benefits for people, e.g. B. Protection from floods and improved health.

“This software helps design cities that are better for both people and nature,” said Anne Guerry, chief strategy officer and lead scientist at the Natural Capital Project. “Urban nature is a multitasking benefactor – the trees in your street can bring the temperature down, making your home cooler on hot summer days. At the same time, they soak up the carbon emissions that cause climate change, create a free, accessible place to stay healthy through physical activity, and simply make your city more enjoyable. “


Urban InVEST is free, open source software that creates maps to show city planners and developers where investing in nature can maximize benefits for people. The software was developed by the Natural Capital Project. Photo credits: Video: Talia K. Trepte, Footage: Pexels.com, Music: “Stay with me” by Michael Ramir C.

By 2050, experts expect that over 70 percent of the world’s population will live in cities – in the USA this is already more than 80 percent. As the global community becomes more urban, builders and city planners are increasingly interested in green infrastructure such as tree-lined paths and community gardens that offer people a stream of benefits. But if planners don’t have detailed information about where a pathway will encourage most people to exercise, or how a community garden will protect a neighborhood from flood risks while helping people relax mentally, they cannot invest strategically in nature.

“With this software we answer three crucial questions: Where in a city does nature offer what benefits for people, how much of each benefit does it bring and who receives these benefits?” Said Perrine Hamel, lead author of a new article about the software that was published at the time of research in the Stanford Natural Capital Project’s Urban Sustainability and Livable Cities Program.

The software called Urban InVEST is the first of its kind for cities and enables the combination of environmental data such as temperature patterns with social demographics and economic data such as income levels. Users can enter their city’s records into the software or access a variety of open global data sources, from NASA satellites to local weather stations. The new software complements the existing InVEST software suite of the Natural Capital Project, a set of tools developed for experts to map and model the benefits of nature for humans.

To test Urban InVEST, the team deployed the software in several cities around the world: Paris, France; Lausanne, Switzerland; Shenzhen and Guangzhou, China; and several US cities, including San Francisco and Minneapolis. In many cases, they worked with local partners to understand priority issues – in Paris, candidates for a local election campaigned for the need for urban greening, while in Minneapolis, planners decided to recycle unused golf course land.

Let the numbers run

In Shenzhen, China, the researchers used Urban InVEST to calculate how natural infrastructures such as parks, grassland and forests would reduce damage in the event of a severe storm that occurs only once in a hundred years. They found that the city’s nature would help prevent $ 25 billion in damage by sucking up rain and diverting floods. They also showed that natural infrastructure – like trees and parks – lowered the daily air temperature in Shenzhen by 5.4 degrees Fahrenheit (3 degrees Celsius) on hot summer days, giving the city $ 71,000 a day in benefits.

Alignment with imbalances

Nature is often unevenly distributed across cities – which puts people on low incomes at a disadvantage. The data shows that low-income and marginalized urban communities often have less access to nature, meaning they are unable to reap the benefits nature offers to wealthier populations, such as improved mental and physical health.

In Paris, the researchers examined neighborhoods with no access to natural areas and overlaid income and economic data to understand who benefits from nature. The software helped determine where investing in more green spaces – like parks and bike lanes – could be most effective in promoting health and wellbeing in an equitable manner.

Planning for a greener future

In Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota region, golf revenues are declining. The downturn has created an attractive opportunity for private golf courses to sell their land for development. But should developers create a new park or build a new neighborhood? Urban InVEST showed how compared to golf courses new parks can increase urban cooling, keep river water clean, support bee pollinators and preserve dwindling biodiversity. New housing developments, on the other hand, would raise temperatures, pollute fresh water and reduce the habitat for bees and other biodiversity.

Healthy urban ecosystems

Urban InVEST is already being used outside a research setting – it recently contributed to an assessment of how nature could contribute to carbon storage and lower temperatures in 775 European cities.

“Cities are designed by people more than any other ecosystem. Why not think about how we design the places where most of us spend our time? ”Said Guerry, also a writer on paper. “With Urban InVEST, city administrations can offer residents and visitors all the advantages of nature. They can eliminate inequalities and build more resilient cities, which leads to better long-term outcomes for people and nature. “

Reference: June 21, 2021, Urban Sustainability.
DOI: 10.1038 / s42949-021-00027-9

Anne Guerry is also a Senior Research Associate at the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment. Gretchen Daily, Bing Professor of Environmental Science at Stanford School of Humanities and Sciences, Senior Fellow at Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment, and co-founder of the Stanford Natural Capital Project, is lead author of the article. Other Stanford Natural Capital authors at the time of research include James Douglass, Roy Remme, and Richard Sharp. Remme is now at Leiden University and Sharp leads the Spring Research Innovation Network Group. Perrine Hamel is now at Nanyang Technological University’s Asian School of Environment.

Other authors come from the University of Minnesota Institute on the Environment, Stellenbosch University, Stockholm Resilience Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, AgroParisTech, The Nature Conservancy, INRAE ​​and CIRED.

This work was supported by the Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the LuEsther Mertz Charitable Trust, the Winslow Foundation, the United States Golf Association, the World Bank, FORMAS, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the French Ministry, Nanyang Technological University and individual donors to the Stanford Natural Capital Project and the Center for Conservation Biology.

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