OK: Found an XML parser.
OK: Support for GZIP encoding.
OK: Support for character munging.

Notice: Undefined index: description in /home/morrisc/public_html/rep/rss/rss_parse.inc on line 402

Example Output

Channel: debatepost.com

RSS URL:

Parsed Results (var_dump'ed)

object(MagpieRSS)#4 (23) {
  ["parser"]=>
  resource(10) of type (Unknown)
  ["current_item"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["items"]=>
  array(10) {
    [0]=>
    array(11) {
      ["title"]=>
      string(42) "The best Christ of all time is … |  ICON"
      ["link"]=>
      string(59) "https://debatepost.com/the-best-christ-of-all-time-is-icon/"
      ["dc"]=>
      array(1) {
        ["creator"]=>
        string(10) "Susan Paul"
      }
      ["pubdate"]=>
      string(31) "Sat, 16 Oct 2021 20:16:38 +0000"
      ["category"]=>
      string(40) "Movie Production CompaniesChristICONTime"
      ["guid"]=>
      string(59) "https://debatepost.com/the-best-christ-of-all-time-is-icon/"
      ["description"]=>
      string(534) "Diogo Morgado in & # 039; Son of God & # 039 ;.CORDON The movie Noah, by Darren Aronofsky –of which a critic wrote “atheists will become Christians, even if it is to pray to God to save them from this one” -, the success of the miniseries The Bible And every public appearance of ... Read more"
      ["content"]=>
      array(1) {
        ["encoded"]=>
        string(12749) "
Diogo Morgado in & # 039; Son of God & # 039 ;.CORDON

The movie Noah, by Darren Aronofsky –of which a critic wrote “atheists will become Christians, even if it is to pray to God to save them from this one” -, the success of the miniseries The Bible And every public appearance of Jared Leto, who even joked on Twitter that he has the Messiah as a style icon, has once again put the question on the table: Who has what it takes to play the son of God in screen?

For many, the best renditions of Jesus Christ are the most allegorical, those that do not refer literally to the Bible but borrow from its imagery. Paul Newman is not called Jesus but Luke (apostle name) in The legend of the indomitableBut he looks like a perfect crucifixion at the end of the famous scene in which his fellow prisoners challenge him to eat 50 hard-boiled eggs. And you didn’t need to be a theologian, or very imaginative, to unravel the parallels between the last Superman, that of The man of steel by Zack Snyder, and El Salvador. The film’s producer, Christopher Nolan, acknowledged this, admitting that Superman “has the most extraordinary powers and ideals. It is very similar to God ”.

But only a handful of actors have faced that role, crown of thorns included. And not all have come out well. In fact, for many, that was the beginning of the end of their career. In times of contrition, we review the best Christs in audiovisual history.

Diogo Morgado. The Portuguese actor donned the tunic in The Bible and in its shortened version for cinemas, Son of God. His stripped hair, with tips as clean as Leto himself, earned him comparisons to a young Brad Pitt and his intense gaze evoked Marlon Brando. The History Channel’s broadcast of the series triggered the hashtag #HotJesus and led some to complain that Morgado is actually too much. hot, since the Lord should not go around inspiring impure acts (photo, on these lines).

Mel Gibson directs Jim Caviezel in 'The Passion of the Christ'.
Mel Gibson directs Jim Caviezel in ‘The Passion of the Christ’.Cordon.

– Jim Caviezel. The actor, a Catholic almost as devout as Mel Gibson, who directed him in Passion of Christ, it didn’t make much money out of the entire hour of footage spent being beaten, stoned, pounded, and, wow, crucified in the movie, certainly the most gore that the Passion has never been filmed. The film was a blockbuster thanks to clever marketing church-to-church that brought millions of Americans to the movies who never set foot on it but, despite that, his career never took off and he blames the role for having ruined his life. Today is what a typecast actor might say: his last big project was an audiobook of the Bible.

Willem Dafoe.
Willem Dafoe.CORDON

– Willem Dafoe. Pick such a carnal actor and dangerous as Dafoe to play God’s son is surely the second most controversial decision Martin Scorsese made in the casting of The last temptation of Christ, considering that David Bowie plays Pontius Pilate. Always intense, it was said of him that he incarnated Jesus as if he had a restraining order. The fundamentalists who took a liking to him for the famous sex scene with Maria Magdalena (Barbara Hershey), which is actually a dream, surely did not ingratiate themselves with him when he filmed in 2009 Antichrist, con Lars von Trier.

– Max von Sydow. There are bearded Christs and bushy beard Christs, but only one with a little goatee. beatnik very of the time. Surely today no one would choose a blue-eyed Swede to play a native of Palestine, but in 1965, when it was filmed The greatest story ever told, no one blinked at a Norse Jesus. The director wanted an actor unknown to the American public and was seduced by the solemnity that Von Sydow emanated in Ingmar Bergman’s films, but critics were not convinced by his performance, which has made him go down in history as “the Christ giving yuyu”.

– Christian Bale. In his obituary, the actor will be remembered as Batman, as the boy from The Sun’s empire and like the guy who screamed like a madman on the famous YouTube in which he attacks a technician. But Bale also played the Messiah in the 1999 TV series. Mary, the mother of Jesus. The actor is famous for his level of pride and obsession: to shoot The Machinist He had to lose some weight and he fed for weeks only on coffee and apples and when he gave life to Batman he kept the Bruce Wayne accent even in the promotion, months after filming, giving the interviews with American leave, instead of his intonation natural british. So anyone knows what he did to prepare for the role of Jesus. It’s a detail, Christian, but you don’t have to turn Font Vella into Rioja.

Christian Bale.
Christian Bale.CORDON

– Robert Powell. Like other directors before and after him, Franco Zefirelli wanted a stranger to star in his epic miniseries Jesus of Nazareth. He found the cheekbones he was looking for on the face of British Robert Powell, who underwent something of a conversion to faith during filming. His face would remain associated with that of Christ for years in the popular imagination, perhaps thanks to the countless reruns of the series, almost always at Easter.

– Will Ferrell. When Jesus appears to adolescent Catholic Mary Katherine Gallagher, played by Molly Shannon, he does so with Will Ferrell’s face, body, permanent Infanta Elena style, and (a lot) of Will Ferrell’s chest hair. The comedian tackled the role in the 1999 sitcom Superstar, a spin-off of the program Saturday Night Live.

'Jesus Christ Superstar'.
‘Jesus Christ Superstar’.CORDON

– Ted Neeley. Legendary critic Roger Ebert said of the actor in Jesus Christ Superstar that he had managed to make a “human, strong and attainable” Jesus, but the general reception called him “too hippy”. Neeley, whose career was not exactly relaunched after the role, is surely the living actor who has made the most of Christ, since he has spent his life performing the musical with different companies, reaching more than 1,700 performances. The public forgave him with Christian charity that he looked quite over 33 years old.

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
The best Christ of all time is … | ICON

" } ["summary"]=> string(534) "Diogo Morgado in & # 039; Son of God & # 039 ;.CORDON The movie Noah, by Darren Aronofsky –of which a critic wrote “atheists will become Christians, even if it is to pray to God to save them from this one” -, the success of the miniseries The Bible And every public appearance of ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(12749) "
Diogo Morgado in & # 039; Son of God & # 039 ;.CORDON

The movie Noah, by Darren Aronofsky –of which a critic wrote “atheists will become Christians, even if it is to pray to God to save them from this one” -, the success of the miniseries The Bible And every public appearance of Jared Leto, who even joked on Twitter that he has the Messiah as a style icon, has once again put the question on the table: Who has what it takes to play the son of God in screen?

For many, the best renditions of Jesus Christ are the most allegorical, those that do not refer literally to the Bible but borrow from its imagery. Paul Newman is not called Jesus but Luke (apostle name) in The legend of the indomitableBut he looks like a perfect crucifixion at the end of the famous scene in which his fellow prisoners challenge him to eat 50 hard-boiled eggs. And you didn’t need to be a theologian, or very imaginative, to unravel the parallels between the last Superman, that of The man of steel by Zack Snyder, and El Salvador. The film’s producer, Christopher Nolan, acknowledged this, admitting that Superman “has the most extraordinary powers and ideals. It is very similar to God ”.

But only a handful of actors have faced that role, crown of thorns included. And not all have come out well. In fact, for many, that was the beginning of the end of their career. In times of contrition, we review the best Christs in audiovisual history.

Diogo Morgado. The Portuguese actor donned the tunic in The Bible and in its shortened version for cinemas, Son of God. His stripped hair, with tips as clean as Leto himself, earned him comparisons to a young Brad Pitt and his intense gaze evoked Marlon Brando. The History Channel’s broadcast of the series triggered the hashtag #HotJesus and led some to complain that Morgado is actually too much. hot, since the Lord should not go around inspiring impure acts (photo, on these lines).

Mel Gibson directs Jim Caviezel in 'The Passion of the Christ'.
Mel Gibson directs Jim Caviezel in ‘The Passion of the Christ’.Cordon.

– Jim Caviezel. The actor, a Catholic almost as devout as Mel Gibson, who directed him in Passion of Christ, it didn’t make much money out of the entire hour of footage spent being beaten, stoned, pounded, and, wow, crucified in the movie, certainly the most gore that the Passion has never been filmed. The film was a blockbuster thanks to clever marketing church-to-church that brought millions of Americans to the movies who never set foot on it but, despite that, his career never took off and he blames the role for having ruined his life. Today is what a typecast actor might say: his last big project was an audiobook of the Bible.

Willem Dafoe.
Willem Dafoe.CORDON

– Willem Dafoe. Pick such a carnal actor and dangerous as Dafoe to play God’s son is surely the second most controversial decision Martin Scorsese made in the casting of The last temptation of Christ, considering that David Bowie plays Pontius Pilate. Always intense, it was said of him that he incarnated Jesus as if he had a restraining order. The fundamentalists who took a liking to him for the famous sex scene with Maria Magdalena (Barbara Hershey), which is actually a dream, surely did not ingratiate themselves with him when he filmed in 2009 Antichrist, con Lars von Trier.

– Max von Sydow. There are bearded Christs and bushy beard Christs, but only one with a little goatee. beatnik very of the time. Surely today no one would choose a blue-eyed Swede to play a native of Palestine, but in 1965, when it was filmed The greatest story ever told, no one blinked at a Norse Jesus. The director wanted an actor unknown to the American public and was seduced by the solemnity that Von Sydow emanated in Ingmar Bergman’s films, but critics were not convinced by his performance, which has made him go down in history as “the Christ giving yuyu”.

– Christian Bale. In his obituary, the actor will be remembered as Batman, as the boy from The Sun’s empire and like the guy who screamed like a madman on the famous YouTube in which he attacks a technician. But Bale also played the Messiah in the 1999 TV series. Mary, the mother of Jesus. The actor is famous for his level of pride and obsession: to shoot The Machinist He had to lose some weight and he fed for weeks only on coffee and apples and when he gave life to Batman he kept the Bruce Wayne accent even in the promotion, months after filming, giving the interviews with American leave, instead of his intonation natural british. So anyone knows what he did to prepare for the role of Jesus. It’s a detail, Christian, but you don’t have to turn Font Vella into Rioja.

Christian Bale.
Christian Bale.CORDON

– Robert Powell. Like other directors before and after him, Franco Zefirelli wanted a stranger to star in his epic miniseries Jesus of Nazareth. He found the cheekbones he was looking for on the face of British Robert Powell, who underwent something of a conversion to faith during filming. His face would remain associated with that of Christ for years in the popular imagination, perhaps thanks to the countless reruns of the series, almost always at Easter.

– Will Ferrell. When Jesus appears to adolescent Catholic Mary Katherine Gallagher, played by Molly Shannon, he does so with Will Ferrell’s face, body, permanent Infanta Elena style, and (a lot) of Will Ferrell’s chest hair. The comedian tackled the role in the 1999 sitcom Superstar, a spin-off of the program Saturday Night Live.

'Jesus Christ Superstar'.
‘Jesus Christ Superstar’.CORDON

– Ted Neeley. Legendary critic Roger Ebert said of the actor in Jesus Christ Superstar that he had managed to make a “human, strong and attainable” Jesus, but the general reception called him “too hippy”. Neeley, whose career was not exactly relaunched after the role, is surely the living actor who has made the most of Christ, since he has spent his life performing the musical with different companies, reaching more than 1,700 performances. The public forgave him with Christian charity that he looked quite over 33 years old.

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
The best Christ of all time is … | ICON

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1634415398) } [1]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(71) "Daniela Villa and Alexia Ulbarri, the designers who closed Fashion Week" ["link"]=> string(94) "https://debatepost.com/daniela-villa-and-alexia-ulbarri-the-designers-who-closed-fashion-week/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Susan Paul" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Sat, 16 Oct 2021 20:15:30 +0000" ["category"]=> string(77) "Movie Production CompaniesAlexiaclosedDanieladesignersFashionUlbarriVillaweek" ["guid"]=> string(94) "https://debatepost.com/daniela-villa-and-alexia-ulbarri-the-designers-who-closed-fashion-week/" ["description"]=> string(637) "Fashion week came to an end this Friday and the designers who closed the celebration of the XV anniversary of Mercedes Benz Fashion Week México, They were Daniela Villa and Alexia Ulibarri, in one of the beautiful balconies of the Four Seasons hotel in Mexico City. One of the main hallmarks of Daniela Villa’s brand ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(14000) "

Fashion week came to an end this Friday and the designers who closed the celebration of the XV anniversary of Mercedes Benz Fashion Week México, They were Daniela Villa and Alexia Ulibarri, in one of the beautiful balconies of the Four Seasons hotel in Mexico City.

One of the main hallmarks of Daniela Villa’s brand are hats Photo: Rosario Servin

Around 7:00 at night, on the balcony of the luxurious hotel, the “Mexiterránea” runway by Daniela Villa began, as many of the designers present at fashion week make a brand of her name. This catwalk is inspired by emblematic places, such as the landscapes and tides of the Mediterranean that the designer has been able to witness, not leaving aside her love for the bohemian and to transmit it in her garments collection after collection.

In this catwalk he showed us proposals with large decorative knots that are also known as macramé and textiles made in Oaxaca that make his collection even richer, culturally and visually speaking.

Details in macramé Photo: Rosario Servin

All the proposals we saw were with silk, cotton and natural handmade fabrics, we saw a range of neutral colors such as beige, sand, white, to go to black with silver, blue and yellow flashes. This collection was the only one that presented clothing for both sexes, even some pieces can be classified as androgynous because there were proposals that can be used by men or women, such as the robes / kimono that men modeled.

Photo: Rosario Servin

One of the peculiarities of the Daniela Villa brand is that it always proposes large beach hats that make the woman’s face mysterious, maintaining the touch of sensuality, this time it maintained its constancy of offering hats and in some of the outings it was the star accessory .

Daniela Villa at Mercedes Benz Fashion Week Mexico Photo: Rosario Servin

The details in her pieces are the icing on the cake. In the necklines of the dresses we saw bows that cross the back and in some others, we saw camisoles that on the cuffs are adorned with bows that make them fit your measure; In the pieces that are to be used on the beach, the striking thing is the shiny ribbons that ran along the length of the body and some waistbands that accentuate the silhouette of the woman, made with macramé.

The wide and fluffy sleeves make one think of the foam that the sea leaves behind and they are the most elegant touch and what most stylizes the silhouette of the people who are about to wear any of the pieces that Daniela Villa presented to us.

Fluffy sleeves that make us think of the waves of the sea Photo: Rosario Servin

It was a timeless collection that reflects the soul and essence of the Boho-Chic style. This style is characterized by being comfortable because it is loose and bohemian, it is made up of many elements such as beads, shells, even feathers—.

Photo: Rosario Servin

fair

Alexia Ulibarri He showed us a collection that he called “Fiera”, a name that reflects the feminine strength, sexuality and sensuality of women.

Fiera by Alexia Ulibarri Photo: Rosario Servin

Ulibarri is one of the designers who has stood out in the world of fashion for her eponymous brand, recently she made a collection inspired by the villain Cruella in collaboration with Disney, the London touches are perfectly studied since her preparation to venture into the world of fashion he did at The London College of Fashion, at the Marangoni Institute in London and at Central Saint Martins.

Photo: Rosario Servin

Throughout her career that began in 2010, she has dressed great celebrities such as: Alessandra Ambrosio, actress and iconic Brazilian model of the nineties, known for being one of the Angels of the Victoria Secret lingerie brand; Emma Roberts, an American actress who played the character of Chanel Oberlin in the horror comedy series FOX Scream Queens, and on the national side has dressed Ximena Navarrete, a Mexican model who has won beauty titles such as “Nuestra Belleza Jalisco y Mexico ”in 2009, and was“ Miss Universe ”in 2010 as well as the pop singer Belinda, to name a few.

“Fiera” is full of fitted dresses with metal pieces with the silhouette of a leopard, metallic pants and skirts in green, dresses with iridescent beards, raincoats, tailored suits, and corsets with ruffled skirts that make us gaze fixedly on the movement and the way in which the pleating of the pieces looks.

Pleats as a detail Photo: Rosario Servin

The colors that we saw in this collection were from purple, blue, orange, green, black and leopard prints, each and every one of the pieces finished off with a detail; either with a metal piece or with some olán, opening or transparency.

Transparencies and purple tones stood out from this collection Photo: Rosario Servin

This catwalk that stands out for the versatility that the designer applies in the use of colors and that she always maintains herself in making haute couture garments, tells us about the essence of the brand that is ultra-feminine, fun and for all women who use it they feel comfortable with the necklines that the silhouettes bring.

Photo: Rosario Servin

Fashion Week

The tour that took place in fashion week began on Monday with the Francisco Cancino catwalk, a parade of poetic proposals, followed by the Pink Magnolia catwalk, an urban clothing catwalk that proposes and breaks stereotypes full of color. The next day that of Alfredo Martínez, who stood out for his elegance and waste of sensuality to continue with the Carla Fernández catwalk, a catwalk that puts in the foreground that fashion is a social manifestation beyond glamor, Daniela Villa, with her catwalk that makes us lovers of the details that in each of his outings he showed us and finally the catwalk of Alexia Ulibarri, which we enjoy so much with his proposals in litmus color and his dresses that are finished in metallic accessories in the shape of a leopard, alluding to to name the collection.

Pink Magnolia Photo: Rosario Servin

This fashion week that began on Monday, October 11, concluded with various proposals that we have to use in the seasons of the coming year, the reason for these catwalks to exist is to prepare us to know how to dress and to know what colors, silhouettes even What is the message of the clothes that we will be wearing in the following seasons of the year.

Cancun catwalk Photo: Rosario Servin

Fashion Week It is celebrated twice a year and goes around the world, it is designed so that the proposals of the most prominent designers of the moment or the most iconic designers of the moment are known. In Mexico, the fashion week began in 2006 under the Mercedes Benz brand in order to be Mercedes Benz Fashion Week México and little by little the national fashion industry has been exalted that although fashion, all of society makes it.

With this fashion week and the celebration for the 15 XV years of Fashion Week, we can see that fashion in Mexico continues to take more successful steps, firm steps, listening to what consumers want. Clothes are becoming more and more usable, they are no longer proposals that would not be used on the street, now they are clothes that we would constantly wear, with the proposals of these 6 designers we can realize the reflection that was made to know how we want to dress in a city as chaotic as Mexico City is, also thinking about how to dress in other states taking into account the climate.

Clothes change our spirits and what better way than to have haute couture pieces with Mexican roots.

isamar.ramirez@eleconomista.mx

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
Daniela Villa and Alexia Ulbarri, the designers who closed Fashion Week

" } ["summary"]=> string(637) "Fashion week came to an end this Friday and the designers who closed the celebration of the XV anniversary of Mercedes Benz Fashion Week México, They were Daniela Villa and Alexia Ulibarri, in one of the beautiful balconies of the Four Seasons hotel in Mexico City. One of the main hallmarks of Daniela Villa’s brand ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(14000) "

Fashion week came to an end this Friday and the designers who closed the celebration of the XV anniversary of Mercedes Benz Fashion Week México, They were Daniela Villa and Alexia Ulibarri, in one of the beautiful balconies of the Four Seasons hotel in Mexico City.

One of the main hallmarks of Daniela Villa’s brand are hats Photo: Rosario Servin

Around 7:00 at night, on the balcony of the luxurious hotel, the “Mexiterránea” runway by Daniela Villa began, as many of the designers present at fashion week make a brand of her name. This catwalk is inspired by emblematic places, such as the landscapes and tides of the Mediterranean that the designer has been able to witness, not leaving aside her love for the bohemian and to transmit it in her garments collection after collection.

In this catwalk he showed us proposals with large decorative knots that are also known as macramé and textiles made in Oaxaca that make his collection even richer, culturally and visually speaking.

Details in macramé Photo: Rosario Servin

All the proposals we saw were with silk, cotton and natural handmade fabrics, we saw a range of neutral colors such as beige, sand, white, to go to black with silver, blue and yellow flashes. This collection was the only one that presented clothing for both sexes, even some pieces can be classified as androgynous because there were proposals that can be used by men or women, such as the robes / kimono that men modeled.

Photo: Rosario Servin

One of the peculiarities of the Daniela Villa brand is that it always proposes large beach hats that make the woman’s face mysterious, maintaining the touch of sensuality, this time it maintained its constancy of offering hats and in some of the outings it was the star accessory .

Daniela Villa at Mercedes Benz Fashion Week Mexico Photo: Rosario Servin

The details in her pieces are the icing on the cake. In the necklines of the dresses we saw bows that cross the back and in some others, we saw camisoles that on the cuffs are adorned with bows that make them fit your measure; In the pieces that are to be used on the beach, the striking thing is the shiny ribbons that ran along the length of the body and some waistbands that accentuate the silhouette of the woman, made with macramé.

The wide and fluffy sleeves make one think of the foam that the sea leaves behind and they are the most elegant touch and what most stylizes the silhouette of the people who are about to wear any of the pieces that Daniela Villa presented to us.

Fluffy sleeves that make us think of the waves of the sea Photo: Rosario Servin

It was a timeless collection that reflects the soul and essence of the Boho-Chic style. This style is characterized by being comfortable because it is loose and bohemian, it is made up of many elements such as beads, shells, even feathers—.

Photo: Rosario Servin

fair

Alexia Ulibarri He showed us a collection that he called “Fiera”, a name that reflects the feminine strength, sexuality and sensuality of women.

Fiera by Alexia Ulibarri Photo: Rosario Servin

Ulibarri is one of the designers who has stood out in the world of fashion for her eponymous brand, recently she made a collection inspired by the villain Cruella in collaboration with Disney, the London touches are perfectly studied since her preparation to venture into the world of fashion he did at The London College of Fashion, at the Marangoni Institute in London and at Central Saint Martins.

Photo: Rosario Servin

Throughout her career that began in 2010, she has dressed great celebrities such as: Alessandra Ambrosio, actress and iconic Brazilian model of the nineties, known for being one of the Angels of the Victoria Secret lingerie brand; Emma Roberts, an American actress who played the character of Chanel Oberlin in the horror comedy series FOX Scream Queens, and on the national side has dressed Ximena Navarrete, a Mexican model who has won beauty titles such as “Nuestra Belleza Jalisco y Mexico ”in 2009, and was“ Miss Universe ”in 2010 as well as the pop singer Belinda, to name a few.

“Fiera” is full of fitted dresses with metal pieces with the silhouette of a leopard, metallic pants and skirts in green, dresses with iridescent beards, raincoats, tailored suits, and corsets with ruffled skirts that make us gaze fixedly on the movement and the way in which the pleating of the pieces looks.

Pleats as a detail Photo: Rosario Servin

The colors that we saw in this collection were from purple, blue, orange, green, black and leopard prints, each and every one of the pieces finished off with a detail; either with a metal piece or with some olán, opening or transparency.

Transparencies and purple tones stood out from this collection Photo: Rosario Servin

This catwalk that stands out for the versatility that the designer applies in the use of colors and that she always maintains herself in making haute couture garments, tells us about the essence of the brand that is ultra-feminine, fun and for all women who use it they feel comfortable with the necklines that the silhouettes bring.

Photo: Rosario Servin

Fashion Week

The tour that took place in fashion week began on Monday with the Francisco Cancino catwalk, a parade of poetic proposals, followed by the Pink Magnolia catwalk, an urban clothing catwalk that proposes and breaks stereotypes full of color. The next day that of Alfredo Martínez, who stood out for his elegance and waste of sensuality to continue with the Carla Fernández catwalk, a catwalk that puts in the foreground that fashion is a social manifestation beyond glamor, Daniela Villa, with her catwalk that makes us lovers of the details that in each of his outings he showed us and finally the catwalk of Alexia Ulibarri, which we enjoy so much with his proposals in litmus color and his dresses that are finished in metallic accessories in the shape of a leopard, alluding to to name the collection.

Pink Magnolia Photo: Rosario Servin

This fashion week that began on Monday, October 11, concluded with various proposals that we have to use in the seasons of the coming year, the reason for these catwalks to exist is to prepare us to know how to dress and to know what colors, silhouettes even What is the message of the clothes that we will be wearing in the following seasons of the year.

Cancun catwalk Photo: Rosario Servin

Fashion Week It is celebrated twice a year and goes around the world, it is designed so that the proposals of the most prominent designers of the moment or the most iconic designers of the moment are known. In Mexico, the fashion week began in 2006 under the Mercedes Benz brand in order to be Mercedes Benz Fashion Week México and little by little the national fashion industry has been exalted that although fashion, all of society makes it.

With this fashion week and the celebration for the 15 XV years of Fashion Week, we can see that fashion in Mexico continues to take more successful steps, firm steps, listening to what consumers want. Clothes are becoming more and more usable, they are no longer proposals that would not be used on the street, now they are clothes that we would constantly wear, with the proposals of these 6 designers we can realize the reflection that was made to know how we want to dress in a city as chaotic as Mexico City is, also thinking about how to dress in other states taking into account the climate.

Clothes change our spirits and what better way than to have haute couture pieces with Mexican roots.

isamar.ramirez@eleconomista.mx

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
Daniela Villa and Alexia Ulbarri, the designers who closed Fashion Week

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1634415330) } [2]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(70) "Godless: a clever western that combines the traditional and the modern" ["link"]=> string(93) "https://debatepost.com/godless-a-clever-western-that-combines-the-traditional-and-the-modern/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Susan Paul" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Sat, 16 Oct 2021 20:13:48 +0000" ["category"]=> string(71) "Movie Production CompaniesClevercombinesGodlessmoderntraditionalwestern" ["guid"]=> string(93) "https://debatepost.com/godless-a-clever-western-that-combines-the-traditional-and-the-modern/" ["description"]=> string(637) "Over the past few months, Netflix has made sure we don’t have time to get cold: American Vandal, Stranger Things, Mindhunter, Dark, The Punisher. The platform streaming It has bombarded us with one premiere after another. It is something that is appreciated, but at the same time it is a double-edged sword. With so many ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(15148) "

Over the past few months, Netflix has made sure we don’t have time to get cold: American Vandal, Stranger Things, Mindhunter, Dark, The Punisher. The platform streaming It has bombarded us with one premiere after another. It is something that is appreciated, but at the same time it is a double-edged sword. With so many star series on offer (I have already read “oversupply”, a relative of the overinformation of our times), it is easy for us to miss something good that does not make so much noise. That’s why I want to vindicate Godless: a western miniseries written and directed by Scott Frank that has passed under the radar, without pain or glory in the meantime and so much front-page product, and that is worth it for how it tries to regenerate a classic genre and adapt it to new audiences.

An outdated genre?

Source: celluloidheaven.com

Talking about western means talking about the origins of cinema. An experimental 12-minute short film called The Great Train Robbery, in 1903, it was probably the first approximation. It’s curious. Unlike the other genres, the western was not adapted from literature. It is the only genre that was born in the cinema, and it is something understandable; It is a space that brings together everything that the cinema of attractions was looking for in those days: something exciting with which to hang out, wrapped in the American ideal. Thanks to Stagecoach By John Ford, in 1939, the genre became popular with John Wayne and lived through its golden age for the next twenty years: High Noon (1952), Shane (1953), The Searchers (1956) the The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962), for example.

Over the next several decades, directors like Clint Eastwood revitalized that genre with tapes like Unforgiven (1992), but never with the same force. Little by little, save remakes like True Grift (2010) the The Magnificent Seven (2016), the western has been relegated to hybridize with other genres, to become narrative and aesthetic resources. I talk about movies like Gran Torino (2008), Hell or High Water (2016) the Logan (2017). Serially, except for exceptions such as Deadwood (2004) or less brilliant Hell on Wheels (2011), few dare to build a purely western universe, so they also try to disguise it, as in Westworld (2016).

Logan (2017) showing his reference, Shane (1953). Source: geekengladiators.com

What I want to imply, is that the western genre has gradually become a museum piece. The keys of the genre that was born in the cinema have become outdated, so it is easier to synthesize their formal or narrative keys and mask them in other more popular genres. Being set in a historical period of the 19th century, the western is indisputably macho, for example. It is a real turnip field. Don’t get me wrong, it’s still a genre that I adore, and you have to see it knowing its context. However, I understand that certain elements can become a barrier not only for creators, producers or distributors, but also for new audiences.

And here it comes in Godless: a purely western miniseries that puts the most classic of the genre on screen, but at the same time cleverly discards certain loopholes that have become outdated. The result is something that does not reinvent anything, but it does adapt the traditional for new audiences.

A feminist western

La Belle, a village of women. Source: wmagazine.com

Godless develops the most classic theme of the genre, revenge, in seven chapters that move around seventy minutes: Frank Griffin, the famous leader of a group of bandits wanted by the authorities, is hunting Roy Goode, a former member of his gang who has betrayed him in his latest looting. Trying to escape, Roy hides on the outskirts of La Belle, New Mexico, a town mostly inhabited by widowed women because of a collapse at the mine where the men worked.

In its premise, you can already appreciate that combination of the classic and the modern. It is a narrative loaded with timeless elements that we have seen in countless films of the genre, but, at the same time, with a very intelligent twist that introduces modern plots. Because Godless is full of bandits terrorizing towns, living room shootings, idyllic romances, conflicts between whites, blacks and natives and great wide shots that would be nice to see in a movie theater. However, it also has a village inhabited by women, and some of those women are not interested in men, or some of those women seek relationships outside of their race.

In those waters it moves Godless, between the classic and the modern, with a slow but never boring rhythm that will appeal to both the most fans of the genre and those who do not know anything about it.

A good cast full of iconic characters

Frank Griffin, the villain of the series. Source: indiewire.com

Despite the fact that the revenge arc between Frank Griffin (Jeff Daniels) and Roy Goode (Jack O’Conell) is the trigger for the plot, the narrative places more emphasis on the inhabitants of La Belle who are affected by that duel. It is a success because that way there is room to develop a good amount of interesting secondary characters. And the series has no qualms about giving more minutes to those subplots or everyday spaces than to Griffin’s own threat, which is present from the beginning but does not explode until the end.

The first mention deserves that Frank Griffin, played by a Jeff Daniels very forceful. Griffin is a complex villain. He is aware that he is the bad guy, but at the same time he preaches and acts as if he is saving lost causes. His threat is not constructed from paraphernalia; the most frightening thing is the calm and the knowledge that it demonstrates when acting. And it is that threat against the clock, omnipresent from the first chapter, which is one of the main hooks of the series. Griffin is always in our heads, whether he’s on screen or not, and we know he’s getting closer.

The relationship between Roy and Alice is one of the most developed. Source: derbytelegraph.co

Roy Goode, played by Jack O’Connell, he is a more archetypal character. Orphaned and without much chance, he was adopted and rescued by Griffin, who raised him as his own son and introduced him to the band. He is a brilliant gunman who seeks redemption, and you can tell from the first moment that he is trying to flee from a world to which he does not belong. Roy is a protagonist who complies, but does not enthuse. Perhaps because of being a good guy or falling too much in a formula that we know, or perhaps because of the level of the secondary actors that surround him.

Of those supporting actors, I would highlight Mary Agnes (Merrit Wever), Sheriff Bill McNue (Scoot McNairy) and his assistant Whitey Winn (Thomas Brodie –Sangster):

Mary Agnes is the independent woman of the people, the one who is not interested in men or in following the path that society imposes on her; dress as you like, without seeing practical interest in a corset; he does what he wants, like having relationships with other women; if she is bothered too much (once) she does not hesitate to take out the shotgun to make her see reason. Strong on the outside, moderately tender on the inside. Merrit Wever eats the screen and champions those solid female characters that are so little used in the genre, along with Alice Fletcher (Michelle Dockery).

Mary Agnes and Alice Fletcher. Source: esquire.com

Bill McNue, brother of Mary Agnes and sheriff of La Belle, is a character with whom it is impossible not to empathize. Due to a blinding illness, he is aware that his glory days are ending. You feel worthless, and the ladies at La Belle have no problem reminding you. His wife is not waiting for him at home, although he does have two children. Hoping to try to do one last thing right, he decides to go after Frank Griffin armed with that pair of eyes that wouldn’t be able to tell a buffalo from a tree. Scoot McNairy achieves that waste, useless, stubborn and honest character.

His assistant, young Whitey Winn, played by Thomas Brodie-Sangster (you may remember him from Game of Thrones), is probably the biggest surprise. Orphan from a young age, he lives in a hovel dirtier than the worst stable, and eats from tuppers that Mary Agnes prepares for you. Skilled with guns but little educated in letters; more untidy than a pig but more loyal than the best horse; respectful, somewhat arrogant and too brave. I insist, you will miss him. The actor embroiders a character that seems written for him.

A great miniseries and the western of the year

Sheriff McNue (right) and his young deputy, Whitey. Source: indiewire.com

With a somewhat more typical ending than would be expected but equally satisfying, Scott Frank reminds us that he does not intend to reinvent the genre, but rather to incorporate modern touches to timeless plots, and achieves his purpose in style.

That you will find in Godless: an intelligent western that discards some loopholes of the genre but that continues to make use of all the places and situations that we know; a space where words weigh heavily, loaded with tense situations where glances are fired; a narrative that takes its time to get from point A to B, stopping in the past of the protagonists and developing several unforgettable secondary characters along the way, and that when it reaches its destination, explodes making all the noise possible in a show of shots, filigree and a lot of blood.

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
Godless: a clever western that combines the traditional and the modern

" } ["summary"]=> string(637) "Over the past few months, Netflix has made sure we don’t have time to get cold: American Vandal, Stranger Things, Mindhunter, Dark, The Punisher. The platform streaming It has bombarded us with one premiere after another. It is something that is appreciated, but at the same time it is a double-edged sword. With so many ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(15148) "

Over the past few months, Netflix has made sure we don’t have time to get cold: American Vandal, Stranger Things, Mindhunter, Dark, The Punisher. The platform streaming It has bombarded us with one premiere after another. It is something that is appreciated, but at the same time it is a double-edged sword. With so many star series on offer (I have already read “oversupply”, a relative of the overinformation of our times), it is easy for us to miss something good that does not make so much noise. That’s why I want to vindicate Godless: a western miniseries written and directed by Scott Frank that has passed under the radar, without pain or glory in the meantime and so much front-page product, and that is worth it for how it tries to regenerate a classic genre and adapt it to new audiences.

An outdated genre?

Source: celluloidheaven.com

Talking about western means talking about the origins of cinema. An experimental 12-minute short film called The Great Train Robbery, in 1903, it was probably the first approximation. It’s curious. Unlike the other genres, the western was not adapted from literature. It is the only genre that was born in the cinema, and it is something understandable; It is a space that brings together everything that the cinema of attractions was looking for in those days: something exciting with which to hang out, wrapped in the American ideal. Thanks to Stagecoach By John Ford, in 1939, the genre became popular with John Wayne and lived through its golden age for the next twenty years: High Noon (1952), Shane (1953), The Searchers (1956) the The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962), for example.

Over the next several decades, directors like Clint Eastwood revitalized that genre with tapes like Unforgiven (1992), but never with the same force. Little by little, save remakes like True Grift (2010) the The Magnificent Seven (2016), the western has been relegated to hybridize with other genres, to become narrative and aesthetic resources. I talk about movies like Gran Torino (2008), Hell or High Water (2016) the Logan (2017). Serially, except for exceptions such as Deadwood (2004) or less brilliant Hell on Wheels (2011), few dare to build a purely western universe, so they also try to disguise it, as in Westworld (2016).

Logan (2017) showing his reference, Shane (1953). Source: geekengladiators.com

What I want to imply, is that the western genre has gradually become a museum piece. The keys of the genre that was born in the cinema have become outdated, so it is easier to synthesize their formal or narrative keys and mask them in other more popular genres. Being set in a historical period of the 19th century, the western is indisputably macho, for example. It is a real turnip field. Don’t get me wrong, it’s still a genre that I adore, and you have to see it knowing its context. However, I understand that certain elements can become a barrier not only for creators, producers or distributors, but also for new audiences.

And here it comes in Godless: a purely western miniseries that puts the most classic of the genre on screen, but at the same time cleverly discards certain loopholes that have become outdated. The result is something that does not reinvent anything, but it does adapt the traditional for new audiences.

A feminist western

La Belle, a village of women. Source: wmagazine.com

Godless develops the most classic theme of the genre, revenge, in seven chapters that move around seventy minutes: Frank Griffin, the famous leader of a group of bandits wanted by the authorities, is hunting Roy Goode, a former member of his gang who has betrayed him in his latest looting. Trying to escape, Roy hides on the outskirts of La Belle, New Mexico, a town mostly inhabited by widowed women because of a collapse at the mine where the men worked.

In its premise, you can already appreciate that combination of the classic and the modern. It is a narrative loaded with timeless elements that we have seen in countless films of the genre, but, at the same time, with a very intelligent twist that introduces modern plots. Because Godless is full of bandits terrorizing towns, living room shootings, idyllic romances, conflicts between whites, blacks and natives and great wide shots that would be nice to see in a movie theater. However, it also has a village inhabited by women, and some of those women are not interested in men, or some of those women seek relationships outside of their race.

In those waters it moves Godless, between the classic and the modern, with a slow but never boring rhythm that will appeal to both the most fans of the genre and those who do not know anything about it.

A good cast full of iconic characters

Frank Griffin, the villain of the series. Source: indiewire.com

Despite the fact that the revenge arc between Frank Griffin (Jeff Daniels) and Roy Goode (Jack O’Conell) is the trigger for the plot, the narrative places more emphasis on the inhabitants of La Belle who are affected by that duel. It is a success because that way there is room to develop a good amount of interesting secondary characters. And the series has no qualms about giving more minutes to those subplots or everyday spaces than to Griffin’s own threat, which is present from the beginning but does not explode until the end.

The first mention deserves that Frank Griffin, played by a Jeff Daniels very forceful. Griffin is a complex villain. He is aware that he is the bad guy, but at the same time he preaches and acts as if he is saving lost causes. His threat is not constructed from paraphernalia; the most frightening thing is the calm and the knowledge that it demonstrates when acting. And it is that threat against the clock, omnipresent from the first chapter, which is one of the main hooks of the series. Griffin is always in our heads, whether he’s on screen or not, and we know he’s getting closer.

The relationship between Roy and Alice is one of the most developed. Source: derbytelegraph.co

Roy Goode, played by Jack O’Connell, he is a more archetypal character. Orphaned and without much chance, he was adopted and rescued by Griffin, who raised him as his own son and introduced him to the band. He is a brilliant gunman who seeks redemption, and you can tell from the first moment that he is trying to flee from a world to which he does not belong. Roy is a protagonist who complies, but does not enthuse. Perhaps because of being a good guy or falling too much in a formula that we know, or perhaps because of the level of the secondary actors that surround him.

Of those supporting actors, I would highlight Mary Agnes (Merrit Wever), Sheriff Bill McNue (Scoot McNairy) and his assistant Whitey Winn (Thomas Brodie –Sangster):

Mary Agnes is the independent woman of the people, the one who is not interested in men or in following the path that society imposes on her; dress as you like, without seeing practical interest in a corset; he does what he wants, like having relationships with other women; if she is bothered too much (once) she does not hesitate to take out the shotgun to make her see reason. Strong on the outside, moderately tender on the inside. Merrit Wever eats the screen and champions those solid female characters that are so little used in the genre, along with Alice Fletcher (Michelle Dockery).

Mary Agnes and Alice Fletcher. Source: esquire.com

Bill McNue, brother of Mary Agnes and sheriff of La Belle, is a character with whom it is impossible not to empathize. Due to a blinding illness, he is aware that his glory days are ending. You feel worthless, and the ladies at La Belle have no problem reminding you. His wife is not waiting for him at home, although he does have two children. Hoping to try to do one last thing right, he decides to go after Frank Griffin armed with that pair of eyes that wouldn’t be able to tell a buffalo from a tree. Scoot McNairy achieves that waste, useless, stubborn and honest character.

His assistant, young Whitey Winn, played by Thomas Brodie-Sangster (you may remember him from Game of Thrones), is probably the biggest surprise. Orphan from a young age, he lives in a hovel dirtier than the worst stable, and eats from tuppers that Mary Agnes prepares for you. Skilled with guns but little educated in letters; more untidy than a pig but more loyal than the best horse; respectful, somewhat arrogant and too brave. I insist, you will miss him. The actor embroiders a character that seems written for him.

A great miniseries and the western of the year

Sheriff McNue (right) and his young deputy, Whitey. Source: indiewire.com

With a somewhat more typical ending than would be expected but equally satisfying, Scott Frank reminds us that he does not intend to reinvent the genre, but rather to incorporate modern touches to timeless plots, and achieves his purpose in style.

That you will find in Godless: an intelligent western that discards some loopholes of the genre but that continues to make use of all the places and situations that we know; a space where words weigh heavily, loaded with tense situations where glances are fired; a narrative that takes its time to get from point A to B, stopping in the past of the protagonists and developing several unforgettable secondary characters along the way, and that when it reaches its destination, explodes making all the noise possible in a show of shots, filigree and a lot of blood.

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
Godless: a clever western that combines the traditional and the modern

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1634415228) } [3]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(99) "Criticism of The Purge: Infinite, the new film of the universe The Night of the Beasts by Blumhouse" ["link"]=> string(121) "https://debatepost.com/criticism-of-the-purge-infinite-the-new-film-of-the-universe-the-night-of-the-beasts-by-blumhouse/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Susan Paul" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Sat, 16 Oct 2021 20:12:28 +0000" ["category"]=> string(80) "Movie Production CompaniesbeastsBlumhouseCriticismfilmInfiniteNightpurgeuniverse" ["guid"]=> string(121) "https://debatepost.com/criticism-of-the-purge-infinite-the-new-film-of-the-universe-the-night-of-the-beasts-by-blumhouse/" ["description"]=> string(691) "Criticism of The Purge: Infinite (Forever Purge), the new film of the universe The Night of the Beasts of Blumhouse that hits the billboards on July 16, 2021. How much play is the premise of the Night of the Beasts franchise! Since it was released in 2013 with the movie The purge: night of the ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(8631) "

Criticism of The Purge: Infinite (Forever Purge), the new film of the universe The Night of the Beasts of Blumhouse that hits the billboards on July 16, 2021.

How much play is the premise of the Night of the Beasts franchise! Since it was released in 2013 with the movie The purge: night of the beasts, the cinematographic saga has been amplified with new titles: Anarchy (2014) and Election (2016) and the prequel The First Purge: Night of the Beasts (2018), one of the most shocking and successful episodes.

To all this we have to add the series of two seasons The purge which adds two different stories to the heart of the story. We are talking about a huge number of stories if we consider that only eight years have passed (and we have experienced a brutal pandemic that has marked shootings, canceled projects and delayed release dates).

As a first clarification, it must be said that all this, the films and the two seasons of the series, are available at Prime Video for those who want to review the saga of the purge complete before going to the cinema to see The Purge: Infinite, the latest addition to the factory Blumhouse.

This is by no means mandatory to understand the film, since the dynamics of the purge and the subversion of the norms that we see now are perfectly explained, but it can be interesting to enjoy the details.

We review some of the best action movies that we can currently find on Netflix, HBO and Amazon Prime Video, authentic masterpieces of the genre that you should see at least once in your life.

Now, what does this fifth film have to add to what has already been narrated? Well, it seems that, arguably, not so much. Its greatest value is to amplify the repercussions of this famous purge, created by the New Founding Fathers to bring out the instincts of the population during 12 hours without law and make us think what would happen if there were an extremist and clandestine group for which these rules of the game fell short.

That is, they decided to take over the country by spreading massacres and chaos beyond the established margin, systematically exterminating those they consider their enemies.

Keep beating hard in the background of the narrative of The Purge: Infinite the anti-hate speech counting on this occasion with new locations and other different discourses (but not much) that call into question the narrow-mindedness of supremacism and violence as a language to impose indefensible positions in another way. We are facing a border film that does not resist falling into some clichés. Although it is to celebrate the signing of Everardo Gout To give the story a somewhat different flavor (the action looks great and there is a desire to create intense sequences of gradual growth without giving up the terrifying emblematic masks of the assailants), it is also true that the script lacks a point of maturity to get off the rails and be innovative.

The film follows a Mexican couple living in Texas helping the Tuckers, a wealthy family with no prejudice, on a ranch. Adela and Juan have an excellent reputation, especially in the face of the patriarch Caleb, which arouses the jealousy of their son Dylan.

Once the annual purge ends, a band of merciless masked assassins attack the Tuckers, putting them in check. This will force both families to work together to defend themselves and save lives as the United States plunges into an unprecedented spiral of destruction.

One of the strengths of the film is its choral cast, in which each performer fulfills his or her role, without any character standing out excessively. Ana de Reguera (Army of the dead) and Tenoch Huerta (Grace days), they are in charge of a cast in which they also have a great specific weight Will Patton (The halloween night), Cassidy Freeman (Los Gemstone) Josh Lucas (Le Mans ’66). It would not have hurt to develop the background of the characters, really.

Otherwise, James DeMonaco seems in no hurry to abandon the goose that lays the golden eggs: even though the outcome of The Purge: Infinite It tastes like farewell, he has already announced that he is working on the script for a sixth film in which he could once again have Frank Grillo, one of the most charismatic characters in the saga. If he does come back, let’s hope it’s to blow our minds. This film has been somewhat fair, it lacks punch and speech.

Assessment

The new film in the saga The Night of the Beasts proposes a constant and endless purge, implying that the country’s politics may fall into a bottomless pit. Although it is discouraging, The Purge: Infinite has enough difficulties to deliver something new beyond that change in scale and scenery, which refers to the western.

The best

The scope of the end of the film: This time the plot has a much greater global resonance.

Worst

It gives the feeling that the saga is exhausted, the plot revolves in circles around the same old plots.

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
Criticism of The Purge: Infinite, the new film of the universe The Night of the Beasts by Blumhouse

" } ["summary"]=> string(691) "Criticism of The Purge: Infinite (Forever Purge), the new film of the universe The Night of the Beasts of Blumhouse that hits the billboards on July 16, 2021. How much play is the premise of the Night of the Beasts franchise! Since it was released in 2013 with the movie The purge: night of the ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(8631) "

Criticism of The Purge: Infinite (Forever Purge), the new film of the universe The Night of the Beasts of Blumhouse that hits the billboards on July 16, 2021.

How much play is the premise of the Night of the Beasts franchise! Since it was released in 2013 with the movie The purge: night of the beasts, the cinematographic saga has been amplified with new titles: Anarchy (2014) and Election (2016) and the prequel The First Purge: Night of the Beasts (2018), one of the most shocking and successful episodes.

To all this we have to add the series of two seasons The purge which adds two different stories to the heart of the story. We are talking about a huge number of stories if we consider that only eight years have passed (and we have experienced a brutal pandemic that has marked shootings, canceled projects and delayed release dates).

As a first clarification, it must be said that all this, the films and the two seasons of the series, are available at Prime Video for those who want to review the saga of the purge complete before going to the cinema to see The Purge: Infinite, the latest addition to the factory Blumhouse.

This is by no means mandatory to understand the film, since the dynamics of the purge and the subversion of the norms that we see now are perfectly explained, but it can be interesting to enjoy the details.

We review some of the best action movies that we can currently find on Netflix, HBO and Amazon Prime Video, authentic masterpieces of the genre that you should see at least once in your life.

Now, what does this fifth film have to add to what has already been narrated? Well, it seems that, arguably, not so much. Its greatest value is to amplify the repercussions of this famous purge, created by the New Founding Fathers to bring out the instincts of the population during 12 hours without law and make us think what would happen if there were an extremist and clandestine group for which these rules of the game fell short.

That is, they decided to take over the country by spreading massacres and chaos beyond the established margin, systematically exterminating those they consider their enemies.

Keep beating hard in the background of the narrative of The Purge: Infinite the anti-hate speech counting on this occasion with new locations and other different discourses (but not much) that call into question the narrow-mindedness of supremacism and violence as a language to impose indefensible positions in another way. We are facing a border film that does not resist falling into some clichés. Although it is to celebrate the signing of Everardo Gout To give the story a somewhat different flavor (the action looks great and there is a desire to create intense sequences of gradual growth without giving up the terrifying emblematic masks of the assailants), it is also true that the script lacks a point of maturity to get off the rails and be innovative.

The film follows a Mexican couple living in Texas helping the Tuckers, a wealthy family with no prejudice, on a ranch. Adela and Juan have an excellent reputation, especially in the face of the patriarch Caleb, which arouses the jealousy of their son Dylan.

Once the annual purge ends, a band of merciless masked assassins attack the Tuckers, putting them in check. This will force both families to work together to defend themselves and save lives as the United States plunges into an unprecedented spiral of destruction.

One of the strengths of the film is its choral cast, in which each performer fulfills his or her role, without any character standing out excessively. Ana de Reguera (Army of the dead) and Tenoch Huerta (Grace days), they are in charge of a cast in which they also have a great specific weight Will Patton (The halloween night), Cassidy Freeman (Los Gemstone) Josh Lucas (Le Mans ’66). It would not have hurt to develop the background of the characters, really.

Otherwise, James DeMonaco seems in no hurry to abandon the goose that lays the golden eggs: even though the outcome of The Purge: Infinite It tastes like farewell, he has already announced that he is working on the script for a sixth film in which he could once again have Frank Grillo, one of the most charismatic characters in the saga. If he does come back, let’s hope it’s to blow our minds. This film has been somewhat fair, it lacks punch and speech.

Assessment

The new film in the saga The Night of the Beasts proposes a constant and endless purge, implying that the country’s politics may fall into a bottomless pit. Although it is discouraging, The Purge: Infinite has enough difficulties to deliver something new beyond that change in scale and scenery, which refers to the western.

The best

The scope of the end of the film: This time the plot has a much greater global resonance.

Worst

It gives the feeling that the saga is exhausted, the plot revolves in circles around the same old plots.

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
Criticism of The Purge: Infinite, the new film of the universe The Night of the Beasts by Blumhouse

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1634415148) } [4]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(60) "Which arthouse films stood out at the 2021 autumn festivals?" ["link"]=> string(83) "https://debatepost.com/which-arthouse-films-stood-out-at-the-2021-autumn-festivals/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Susan Paul" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Sat, 16 Oct 2021 19:54:25 +0000" ["category"]=> string(41) "TrendingArthouseautumnFESTIVALSFilmsstood" ["guid"]=> string(83) "https://debatepost.com/which-arthouse-films-stood-out-at-the-2021-autumn-festivals/" ["description"]=> string(599) "Fall festival season started on September 1 with Venice and flies full force to a close this week when London and Busan wrap, taking in everything from Toronto, Telluride, San Sebastian and the New York film festival in between. This fully physical 2021 fall festival drop has left plenty to feast on, from titles that ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(12070) "

Fall festival season started on September 1 with Venice and flies full force to a close this week when London and Busan wrap, taking in everything from Toronto, Telluride, San Sebastian and the New York film festival in between.

This fully physical 2021 fall festival drop has left plenty to feast on, from titles that are clearly grooming themselves to enter the awards corridor, to some arthouse treasures which may have escaped immediate attention but won’t stay silent for long. Screen’s critics have called out the ones to watch this year.

Awards contenders

Belfast

To you. Kenneth Branagh
Our critic said: “Engaging, tender film-making which tugs at the heart-strings, spurred by a sympathetic cast and the young lead, newcomer Jude Hill.”
Read our review

C’mon C’mon

To you. Mike Mills
Our critic said: “Joaquin Phoenix shines in Mike Mills’ unsentimental exploration of strained family dynamics.”
Read our review

Cyrano

To you. Joe Wright
Our critic said: “Peter Dinklage steals the show in Joe Wright’s musical version of the classic text.”
Read our review

The Eyes Of Tammy Faye

To you. Michael Showalter
Our critic said: “Jessica Chastain gives a big-hearted performance as Tammy Faye, never judging the tabloid fixture who was widely mocked for her appearance, cartoonish voice and lavish lifestyle.”
Read our review

The Hand of God

To you. Paolo Sorrentino
Our critic said: “Paolo Sorrentino delivers a highly personal memoir that truly breathes on the big screen.”
Read our review

King Richard

To you. Reinaldo Marcus Green
Our critic said: “Guided by strong, complicated performances from Will Smith and Aunjanue Ellis, who play Richard and his long-suffering wife Brandy, director Reinaldo Marcus Green’s drama works best when it pushes against genre conventions.”
Read our review

The Lost Daughter

To you. Maggie Gyllenhaal
Our critic said: “This sinuous adaptation of the novel by Elena Ferrante marks a supremely confident feature directing debut from Maggie Gyllenhaal.”
Read our review

The Power Of The Dog

To you. Jane Campion
Our critic said: “Jane Campion goes full American Gothic with a 1920s-set story that feels like an old-school Western filtered through the dark dramatic mindset of a William Faulkner.”
Read our review

Spencer

To you. Pablo Larrain
Our critic said: ”The film plays with and deconstructs the familiar repertoire of Diana myths and images to offer an empathetic, intelligent insight into the prison of fame and privilege, with Kristen Stewart offering a lead performance that is brittle, tender, sometimes playful and not a little uncanny.”
Read our review

The Tragedy Of Macbeth

To you. Joel coen
Our critic said: “As Macbeth, Washington is both fierce and weary; as Lady Macbeth – a woman who doesn’t even have a name to call her own – McDormand is ravenous and determined.”
Read our review

Critical favourites

Benediction

To you. Terence Davies
Our critic said: “The life of the poet Siegfried Sassoon (played by Jack Lowden, and, as an older man, Peter Capaldi) is explored in this suitably lyrical portrait.”
Read our review

The Card Counter

To you. Paul Schrader
Our critic said: “A film that continues the second, third or fourth coming (opinions differ) of the 75-year-old director.”
Read our review

The Good Boss

To you. Fernando Leon de Aranoa
Our critic said: “It’s Javier Bardem’s show as he reunites with Fernando Leon de Aranoa for this parable of power in a provincial Spanish town.”
Read our review

Happening

To you. Audrey Diwan
Our critic said: “Venice competition title Happening is uncompromising in its depiction of what French women who wanted to terminate a pregnancy were forced to go through before abortion was legalised in 1975.”
Read our review

The Humans

To you. Stephen Karam
Our critic said: “An unsettling, tightly-acted comedy/drama from Stephen Karam, adapting his own stage play.”
Read our review

Lost Illusions

To you. Xavier Giannoli
Our critic said: “An opulent take on Balzac’s sprawling novel.”
Read our review

Madeline Collins

To you. Antoine Barraud
Our critic said: “Virginie Efira’s central performance carries Antoine Barraud’s intriguing, cleverly structured psychological thriller.”
Read our review

Official Competition

Dirs. Gastón Duprat, Mariano Cohn.
Our critic said: “Antonio Banderas and Penelope Cruz unite with Oscar Martinez for this bitingly funny film world send-up.”
Read our review

The Rescue

Dirs. Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi, Jimmy Chin
Our critic said: “Free Solo wife and husband directors Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi and Jimmy Chin are forensic in the detail they provide and the range of testimonies they have assembled; the result is a tense, absorbing documentary with a strong emotional charge.”
Read our review

The Tender Bar

To you. George Clooney
Our critic said: “Familiar qualities are mitigated by touching passages and a collection of unfussy, lived-in performances, including that of Ben Affleck.”
Read our review

True Things

To you. Harry Wootliff
Our critic said: “The UK’s Harry Wootliff expands her range to a dazzling degree with her immersive second feature – an intoxicating tale of a woman and the wrong man in a rundown seaside town is adventurously delivered.”
Read our review

Off the beaten track

'24'

24

To you. Royston Tan
Our critic said: “Utterly delightful on a scene-by-scene basis as characters are vividly sketched through glimpses of life, work, and artistic pursuits.”
Read our review

7 Prisoners

To you. Alexandre Moratto
Our critic said: “This impressive feature takes the topic of modern-day enslavement as a jumping-off point for a morality tale which gets increasingly knotty and satisfying as it goes on.”
Read our review

As In Heaven

To you. Tea Lindeburg
Our critic said: “An ambitious calling card from the Danish TV director, and technically accomplished in what it sets out to do.”
Read our review

Carajita

Dirs. Silvina Schnicer, Ulises Porra
Our critic said: “The agonies of the Caribbean’s colonial legacy are examined with aesthetic elegance and unsettling elusiveness the second feature by this Argentinian-Spanish writing/directing duo.”
Read our review

Fever Dream

To you. Claudia llosa
Our critic said: “A primal story about our dangerously blasé relationship with the natural world, Fever Dream is ripe for these epidemic times.”
Read our review

Full Time

To you. Eric Gravel
Our critic said:Call My Agent star Laure Calamy delivers a sympathetic but nerve-flaying performance in this propulsively intense piece of filmmaking.”
Read our review

The Mad Woman’s Ball

To you. Melanie Laurent
Our critic said: “A lavish Gallic gothic thriller largely set in Paris’ infamous Salpetriere hospital, this s a strikingly beautiful production which delves deep into the ugliness at the roots of psychiatric medicine.”
Read our review

Miracle

To you. Bogdan George Apetri
Our critic said: “The second in a planned trilogy, Bodgan George Apetri’s gripping, white-knuckle morality tale divides neatly between incident and investigation.”
Read our review

Montana Story

Dirs. Scott McGehee & David Siegel
Our critic said: “The gentle modesty of Montana Story belies the emotional wallop of this study of a sister and brother returning home to face a dying father and an unresolved past.”
Read our review

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
Which arthouse films stood out at the 2021 autumn festivals?

" } ["summary"]=> string(599) "Fall festival season started on September 1 with Venice and flies full force to a close this week when London and Busan wrap, taking in everything from Toronto, Telluride, San Sebastian and the New York film festival in between. This fully physical 2021 fall festival drop has left plenty to feast on, from titles that ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(12070) "

Fall festival season started on September 1 with Venice and flies full force to a close this week when London and Busan wrap, taking in everything from Toronto, Telluride, San Sebastian and the New York film festival in between.

This fully physical 2021 fall festival drop has left plenty to feast on, from titles that are clearly grooming themselves to enter the awards corridor, to some arthouse treasures which may have escaped immediate attention but won’t stay silent for long. Screen’s critics have called out the ones to watch this year.

Awards contenders

Belfast

To you. Kenneth Branagh
Our critic said: “Engaging, tender film-making which tugs at the heart-strings, spurred by a sympathetic cast and the young lead, newcomer Jude Hill.”
Read our review

C’mon C’mon

To you. Mike Mills
Our critic said: “Joaquin Phoenix shines in Mike Mills’ unsentimental exploration of strained family dynamics.”
Read our review

Cyrano

To you. Joe Wright
Our critic said: “Peter Dinklage steals the show in Joe Wright’s musical version of the classic text.”
Read our review

The Eyes Of Tammy Faye

To you. Michael Showalter
Our critic said: “Jessica Chastain gives a big-hearted performance as Tammy Faye, never judging the tabloid fixture who was widely mocked for her appearance, cartoonish voice and lavish lifestyle.”
Read our review

The Hand of God

To you. Paolo Sorrentino
Our critic said: “Paolo Sorrentino delivers a highly personal memoir that truly breathes on the big screen.”
Read our review

King Richard

To you. Reinaldo Marcus Green
Our critic said: “Guided by strong, complicated performances from Will Smith and Aunjanue Ellis, who play Richard and his long-suffering wife Brandy, director Reinaldo Marcus Green’s drama works best when it pushes against genre conventions.”
Read our review

The Lost Daughter

To you. Maggie Gyllenhaal
Our critic said: “This sinuous adaptation of the novel by Elena Ferrante marks a supremely confident feature directing debut from Maggie Gyllenhaal.”
Read our review

The Power Of The Dog

To you. Jane Campion
Our critic said: “Jane Campion goes full American Gothic with a 1920s-set story that feels like an old-school Western filtered through the dark dramatic mindset of a William Faulkner.”
Read our review

Spencer

To you. Pablo Larrain
Our critic said: ”The film plays with and deconstructs the familiar repertoire of Diana myths and images to offer an empathetic, intelligent insight into the prison of fame and privilege, with Kristen Stewart offering a lead performance that is brittle, tender, sometimes playful and not a little uncanny.”
Read our review

The Tragedy Of Macbeth

To you. Joel coen
Our critic said: “As Macbeth, Washington is both fierce and weary; as Lady Macbeth – a woman who doesn’t even have a name to call her own – McDormand is ravenous and determined.”
Read our review

Critical favourites

Benediction

To you. Terence Davies
Our critic said: “The life of the poet Siegfried Sassoon (played by Jack Lowden, and, as an older man, Peter Capaldi) is explored in this suitably lyrical portrait.”
Read our review

The Card Counter

To you. Paul Schrader
Our critic said: “A film that continues the second, third or fourth coming (opinions differ) of the 75-year-old director.”
Read our review

The Good Boss

To you. Fernando Leon de Aranoa
Our critic said: “It’s Javier Bardem’s show as he reunites with Fernando Leon de Aranoa for this parable of power in a provincial Spanish town.”
Read our review

Happening

To you. Audrey Diwan
Our critic said: “Venice competition title Happening is uncompromising in its depiction of what French women who wanted to terminate a pregnancy were forced to go through before abortion was legalised in 1975.”
Read our review

The Humans

To you. Stephen Karam
Our critic said: “An unsettling, tightly-acted comedy/drama from Stephen Karam, adapting his own stage play.”
Read our review

Lost Illusions

To you. Xavier Giannoli
Our critic said: “An opulent take on Balzac’s sprawling novel.”
Read our review

Madeline Collins

To you. Antoine Barraud
Our critic said: “Virginie Efira’s central performance carries Antoine Barraud’s intriguing, cleverly structured psychological thriller.”
Read our review

Official Competition

Dirs. Gastón Duprat, Mariano Cohn.
Our critic said: “Antonio Banderas and Penelope Cruz unite with Oscar Martinez for this bitingly funny film world send-up.”
Read our review

The Rescue

Dirs. Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi, Jimmy Chin
Our critic said: “Free Solo wife and husband directors Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi and Jimmy Chin are forensic in the detail they provide and the range of testimonies they have assembled; the result is a tense, absorbing documentary with a strong emotional charge.”
Read our review

The Tender Bar

To you. George Clooney
Our critic said: “Familiar qualities are mitigated by touching passages and a collection of unfussy, lived-in performances, including that of Ben Affleck.”
Read our review

True Things

To you. Harry Wootliff
Our critic said: “The UK’s Harry Wootliff expands her range to a dazzling degree with her immersive second feature – an intoxicating tale of a woman and the wrong man in a rundown seaside town is adventurously delivered.”
Read our review

Off the beaten track

'24'

24

To you. Royston Tan
Our critic said: “Utterly delightful on a scene-by-scene basis as characters are vividly sketched through glimpses of life, work, and artistic pursuits.”
Read our review

7 Prisoners

To you. Alexandre Moratto
Our critic said: “This impressive feature takes the topic of modern-day enslavement as a jumping-off point for a morality tale which gets increasingly knotty and satisfying as it goes on.”
Read our review

As In Heaven

To you. Tea Lindeburg
Our critic said: “An ambitious calling card from the Danish TV director, and technically accomplished in what it sets out to do.”
Read our review

Carajita

Dirs. Silvina Schnicer, Ulises Porra
Our critic said: “The agonies of the Caribbean’s colonial legacy are examined with aesthetic elegance and unsettling elusiveness the second feature by this Argentinian-Spanish writing/directing duo.”
Read our review

Fever Dream

To you. Claudia llosa
Our critic said: “A primal story about our dangerously blasé relationship with the natural world, Fever Dream is ripe for these epidemic times.”
Read our review

Full Time

To you. Eric Gravel
Our critic said:Call My Agent star Laure Calamy delivers a sympathetic but nerve-flaying performance in this propulsively intense piece of filmmaking.”
Read our review

The Mad Woman’s Ball

To you. Melanie Laurent
Our critic said: “A lavish Gallic gothic thriller largely set in Paris’ infamous Salpetriere hospital, this s a strikingly beautiful production which delves deep into the ugliness at the roots of psychiatric medicine.”
Read our review

Miracle

To you. Bogdan George Apetri
Our critic said: “The second in a planned trilogy, Bodgan George Apetri’s gripping, white-knuckle morality tale divides neatly between incident and investigation.”
Read our review

Montana Story

Dirs. Scott McGehee & David Siegel
Our critic said: “The gentle modesty of Montana Story belies the emotional wallop of this study of a sister and brother returning home to face a dying father and an unresolved past.”
Read our review

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
Which arthouse films stood out at the 2021 autumn festivals?

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1634414065) } [5]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(56) "Chris Hemsworth Is Rumored to Be Joining the DC Universe" ["link"]=> string(80) "https://debatepost.com/chris-hemsworth-is-rumored-to-be-joining-the-dc-universe/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Susan Paul" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Sat, 16 Oct 2021 19:49:25 +0000" ["category"]=> string(44) "TrendingChrisHemsworthJoiningRumoreduniverse" ["guid"]=> string(80) "https://debatepost.com/chris-hemsworth-is-rumored-to-be-joining-the-dc-universe/" ["description"]=> string(561) "After a lot of spinning its wheels, DC’s lineup of movies is finally starting to get back on track. With an injection of new life and a new creative vision steering the ship, recent films have had a much better reception than those of the past. To keep it up, though, Warner Bros. is going ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(5734) "

After a lot of spinning its wheels, DC’s lineup of movies is finally starting to get back on track. With an injection of new life and a new creative vision steering the ship, recent films have had a much better reception than those of the past. To keep it up, though, Warner Bros. is going to have to keep making good decisions. According to rumors, one of their latest gambits may be attempting to poach one of Marvel’s heavy hitters — Chris Hemsworth.

Hemsworth has been an A-list Marvel hero for more than a decade

Chris Hemsworth | Photo by Don Arnold/WireImage

For more than 10 years, Chris Hemsworth has lit up the screen as Thor, the god of thunder. Starring as the Asgardian in multiple films, he helped make the MCU what it is today.

" } ["summary"]=> string(561) "After a lot of spinning its wheels, DC’s lineup of movies is finally starting to get back on track. With an injection of new life and a new creative vision steering the ship, recent films have had a much better reception than those of the past. To keep it up, though, Warner Bros. is going ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(5734) "

After a lot of spinning its wheels, DC’s lineup of movies is finally starting to get back on track. With an injection of new life and a new creative vision steering the ship, recent films have had a much better reception than those of the past. To keep it up, though, Warner Bros. is going to have to keep making good decisions. According to rumors, one of their latest gambits may be attempting to poach one of Marvel’s heavy hitters — Chris Hemsworth.

Hemsworth has been an A-list Marvel hero for more than a decade

Chris Hemsworth | Photo by Don Arnold/WireImage

For more than 10 years, Chris Hemsworth has lit up the screen as Thor, the god of thunder. Starring as the Asgardian in multiple films, he helped make the MCU what it is today.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1634413765) } [6]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(68) "Mick Jagger hits back at McCartney’s dissing of the Rolling Stones" ["link"]=> string(89) "https://debatepost.com/mick-jagger-hits-back-at-mccartneys-dissing-of-the-rolling-stones/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Susan Paul" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Sat, 16 Oct 2021 19:46:04 +0000" ["category"]=> string(52) "TrendingdissingHitsJaggerMcCartneysMickRollingStones" ["guid"]=> string(89) "https://debatepost.com/mick-jagger-hits-back-at-mccartneys-dissing-of-the-rolling-stones/" ["description"]=> string(688) "Mick Jagger has fired back at Paul McCartney’s recent comment about The Rolling Stones being “a blues cover band.” During the Stones’ concert Thursday night at SoFi Stadium in Los Angeles, Jagger took a few moments between songs to deliver a comedic list of celebrities supposedly in attendance at the concert. “There’s so many celebrities here ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(6305) "

Mick Jagger has fired back at Paul McCartney’s recent comment about The Rolling Stones being “a blues cover band.”

During the Stones’ concert Thursday night at SoFi Stadium in Los Angeles, Jagger took a few moments between songs to deliver a comedic list of celebrities supposedly in attendance at the concert.

“There’s so many celebrities here tonight, of course, you know, naturally,” Jagger said stalking the stage. “Megan Fox is here. She’s lovely. Leonardo DiCaprio. Lady Gaga.”

Then he mentioned Kirk Douglas, who passed away in February 2020 and said he must have “misread that one.” Jagger then said, “Paul McCartney is here. He’s going to join us in a blues cover later on.”

Netflix:Streamer’s support of Dave Chappelle is setting a dangerous precedent. Here’s why.

Princess Di:Hollywood’s obsession with Princess Diana will never end, but it’s getting ridiculous

Mick Jagger and Keith Richards of The Rolling Stones perform onstage at SoFi Stadium on October 14, 2021 in Inglewood, California.

McCartney resurrected the longtime debate about the hierarchy of the rival British bands in a recent interview in The New Yorker. “I’m not sure I should say it, but they’re a blues cover band, that’s sort of what the Stones are,” McCartney told editor David Remnick. “I think our net was cast a bit wider than theirs.”

This likely won’t be the last time the two bands trade barbs. More than 40 years ago, John Lennon said the Stones, compared to the Beatles, “are not in the same class, music-wise or power-wise, never were,” during a 1970 Rolling Stone interview.

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
Mick Jagger hits back at McCartney’s dissing of the Rolling Stones

" } ["summary"]=> string(688) "Mick Jagger has fired back at Paul McCartney’s recent comment about The Rolling Stones being “a blues cover band.” During the Stones’ concert Thursday night at SoFi Stadium in Los Angeles, Jagger took a few moments between songs to deliver a comedic list of celebrities supposedly in attendance at the concert. “There’s so many celebrities here ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(6305) "

Mick Jagger has fired back at Paul McCartney’s recent comment about The Rolling Stones being “a blues cover band.”

During the Stones’ concert Thursday night at SoFi Stadium in Los Angeles, Jagger took a few moments between songs to deliver a comedic list of celebrities supposedly in attendance at the concert.

“There’s so many celebrities here tonight, of course, you know, naturally,” Jagger said stalking the stage. “Megan Fox is here. She’s lovely. Leonardo DiCaprio. Lady Gaga.”

Then he mentioned Kirk Douglas, who passed away in February 2020 and said he must have “misread that one.” Jagger then said, “Paul McCartney is here. He’s going to join us in a blues cover later on.”

Netflix:Streamer’s support of Dave Chappelle is setting a dangerous precedent. Here’s why.

Princess Di:Hollywood’s obsession with Princess Diana will never end, but it’s getting ridiculous

Mick Jagger and Keith Richards of The Rolling Stones perform onstage at SoFi Stadium on October 14, 2021 in Inglewood, California.

McCartney resurrected the longtime debate about the hierarchy of the rival British bands in a recent interview in The New Yorker. “I’m not sure I should say it, but they’re a blues cover band, that’s sort of what the Stones are,” McCartney told editor David Remnick. “I think our net was cast a bit wider than theirs.”

This likely won’t be the last time the two bands trade barbs. More than 40 years ago, John Lennon said the Stones, compared to the Beatles, “are not in the same class, music-wise or power-wise, never were,” during a 1970 Rolling Stone interview.

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
Mick Jagger hits back at McCartney’s dissing of the Rolling Stones

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1634413564) } [7]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(81) "‘Peacemaker’ Trailer Promises a Series asHilarious as ‘The Suicide Squad’" ["link"]=> string(93) "https://debatepost.com/peacemaker-trailer-promises-a-series-ashilarious-as-the-suicide-squad/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Susan Paul" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Sat, 16 Oct 2021 19:43:40 +0000" ["category"]=> string(64) "Movie NewsasHilariousPeacemakerpromisesseriesSquadSuicideTrailer" ["guid"]=> string(93) "https://debatepost.com/peacemaker-trailer-promises-a-series-ashilarious-as-the-suicide-squad/" ["description"]=> string(698) "James Gunn’s The Suicide Squad brought a number of DC Comics characters into the DC Extended Universe, and one of the most interesting additions to the franchise is John Cena’s Peacemaker. That’s probably why he’s getting his own television series on HBO Max, picking up after the events of The Suicide Squad. DC FanDome gave ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(5968) "

James Gunn’s The Suicide Squad brought a number of DC Comics characters into the DC Extended Universe, and one of the most interesting additions to the franchise is John Cena’s Peacemaker. That’s probably why he’s getting his own television series on HBO Max, picking up after the events of The Suicide Squad. DC FanDome gave viewers a first look at the upcoming show — and it looks just as dark and entertaining as Gunn’s recent film.

‘Peacemaker’ will dive deeper into John Cena’s ‘The Suicide Squad’ character

John Cena in ‘The Suicide Squad’ | Warner Bros. Pictures/DC Comics

Cena’s Peacemaker proved a conflicting character during The Suicide Squad. Unlike the rest of Amanda Waller’s (Viola Davis) team, he’s on the mission because he genuinely wants to help. Unfortunately, his moral compass tips right over into immoral. Peacemaker is willing to do just about anything to secure peace for his nation. That includes embracing violence in order to do it.

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
‘Peacemaker’ Trailer Promises a Series asHilarious as ‘The Suicide Squad’

" } ["summary"]=> string(698) "James Gunn’s The Suicide Squad brought a number of DC Comics characters into the DC Extended Universe, and one of the most interesting additions to the franchise is John Cena’s Peacemaker. That’s probably why he’s getting his own television series on HBO Max, picking up after the events of The Suicide Squad. DC FanDome gave ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(5968) "

James Gunn’s The Suicide Squad brought a number of DC Comics characters into the DC Extended Universe, and one of the most interesting additions to the franchise is John Cena’s Peacemaker. That’s probably why he’s getting his own television series on HBO Max, picking up after the events of The Suicide Squad. DC FanDome gave viewers a first look at the upcoming show — and it looks just as dark and entertaining as Gunn’s recent film.

‘Peacemaker’ will dive deeper into John Cena’s ‘The Suicide Squad’ character

John Cena in ‘The Suicide Squad’ | Warner Bros. Pictures/DC Comics

Cena’s Peacemaker proved a conflicting character during The Suicide Squad. Unlike the rest of Amanda Waller’s (Viola Davis) team, he’s on the mission because he genuinely wants to help. Unfortunately, his moral compass tips right over into immoral. Peacemaker is willing to do just about anything to secure peace for his nation. That includes embracing violence in order to do it.

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
‘Peacemaker’ Trailer Promises a Series asHilarious as ‘The Suicide Squad’

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1634413420) } [8]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(79) "‘Zack Snyder’s Justice League’ Dominated Its First Week of Physical Sales" ["link"]=> string(94) "https://debatepost.com/zack-snyders-justice-league-dominated-its-first-week-of-physical-sales/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Susan Paul" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Sat, 16 Oct 2021 19:41:16 +0000" ["category"]=> string(58) "TrendingdominatedJusticeLeaguephysicalSalesSnydersweekZack" ["guid"]=> string(94) "https://debatepost.com/zack-snyders-justice-league-dominated-its-first-week-of-physical-sales/" ["description"]=> string(700) "Whoever said ‘the little things count’ was right on the money. A few tweaks here, fewer quips there, and Zack Snyder’s Justice League visibly transforms the massively underwhelming 2017 DC film into a global phenomenon. Jason Momoa (Aquaman / Arthur Curry), Gal Gadot (Diana Prince / Wonder Woman), Ray Fisher (Cyborg / Victor Stone) | ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(6518) "

Whoever said ‘the little things count’ was right on the money. A few tweaks here, fewer quips there, and Zack Snyder’s Justice League visibly transforms the massively underwhelming 2017 DC film into a global phenomenon.

Jason Momoa (Aquaman / Arthur Curry), Gal Gadot (Diana Prince / Wonder Woman), Ray Fisher (Cyborg / Victor Stone) | Photograph by Courtesy of HBO Max

The departure of Zack Snyder from the film’s production led to Joss Whedon being brought in to finish the movie. Despite his best intentions, the director of the Avengers couldn’t merge Marvel’s light-heartedness with DC’s cool demeanor.

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
‘Zack Snyder’s Justice League’ Dominated Its First Week of Physical Sales

" } ["summary"]=> string(700) "Whoever said ‘the little things count’ was right on the money. A few tweaks here, fewer quips there, and Zack Snyder’s Justice League visibly transforms the massively underwhelming 2017 DC film into a global phenomenon. Jason Momoa (Aquaman / Arthur Curry), Gal Gadot (Diana Prince / Wonder Woman), Ray Fisher (Cyborg / Victor Stone) | ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(6518) "

Whoever said ‘the little things count’ was right on the money. A few tweaks here, fewer quips there, and Zack Snyder’s Justice League visibly transforms the massively underwhelming 2017 DC film into a global phenomenon.

Jason Momoa (Aquaman / Arthur Curry), Gal Gadot (Diana Prince / Wonder Woman), Ray Fisher (Cyborg / Victor Stone) | Photograph by Courtesy of HBO Max

The departure of Zack Snyder from the film’s production led to Joss Whedon being brought in to finish the movie. Despite his best intentions, the director of the Avengers couldn’t merge Marvel’s light-heartedness with DC’s cool demeanor.

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
‘Zack Snyder’s Justice League’ Dominated Its First Week of Physical Sales

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1634413276) } [9]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(83) "What the classic Spaghetti Westerns really owe to Akira Kurosawa – nonenglishfeed" ["link"]=> string(103) "https://debatepost.com/what-the-classic-spaghetti-westerns-really-owe-to-akira-kurosawa-nonenglishfeed/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Susan Paul" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Sat, 16 Oct 2021 19:38:38 +0000" ["category"]=> string(62) "TrendingAkiraclassicKurosawanonenglishfeedoweSpaghettiWesterns" ["guid"]=> string(103) "https://debatepost.com/what-the-classic-spaghetti-westerns-really-owe-to-akira-kurosawa-nonenglishfeed/" ["description"]=> string(733) " “For a Few Dollars More” By Damian Flanagan I was recently rewatching the three spaghetti western classics, “A Fistful of Dollars,” “For a Few Dollars More,” and “The Good, The Bad and The Ugly” — collectively known as “The Dollars Trilogy” — films that have long resonated in my imagination. It’s well ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(10322) "





“For a Few Dollars More”


By Damian Flanagan


I was recently rewatching the three spaghetti western classics, “A Fistful of Dollars,” “For a Few Dollars More,” and “The Good, The Bad and The Ugly” — collectively known as “The Dollars Trilogy” — films that have long resonated in my imagination.


It’s well known that “A Fistful of Dollars” was an unauthorised reworking of Japanese director Akira Kurosawa’s highly regarded 1961 film, “Yojinbo” (“The Bodyguard”). Yet if you think about what director Sergio Leone took most from Kurosawa in the trilogy, then it seems less about just copying the character and plot for his opening film and more about allowing Kurosawa’s conceptual ideas to gradually inspire Leone in uniquely interesting ways.


In “Yojinbo” — a film about a masterless samurai playing off two feuding houses of retainers against each other — Kurosawa was daringly satirising the most important value system of pre-modern Japan: The code of feudal loyalty, the idea that absolute, unquestioning obedience to a feudal lord was the greatest samurai virtue.


Confucian ideals about loyalty underpinned the entire power structure of Edo period (1603-1867) Japan and indeed carried on into the modern age, transferred in the Meiji era (1868-1912) to submission to the nation state, and finally in the post-war era to dedication to the Japanese company.


Yet Kurosawa’s anti-hero, memorably played by Toshiro Mifune, is not a self-sacrificing samurai lifted from the pages of classic plays like “The 47 Loyal Retainers,” but rather a pragmatically self-interested and self-contained man, completely uninterested in “loyalty” and casually flipping his services between rival clans as and when he feels like it.





Akira Kurosawa


In “A Fistful of Dollars” (1964), Sergio Leone stayed mostly faithful to the plot of Kurosawa’s original, simply transposing the action from a Japanese village to a Wild West town and retaining the claustrophobic atmosphere. It’s still a story about an enigmatic loner switching loyalty from one scheming clan to another, but in the Wild West — where vigorous individualism reigned supreme — the trampling of the concept of “loyalty” did not carry the same iconoclastic meaning as it did in Japan.


Yet in subsequent films Leone began to explore how his modern take on the Western could be used to subvert specifically European value systems in the same way that Kurosawa had satirised traditional Japanese value systems.


In “For a Few Dollars More” (1965) — while maintaining the same stylized gunfights, cast of degenerate-looking characters, operatic elements and enigmatic lead character as “A Fistful of Dollars” — we have a narrative line which is informed not by Japan but in reaction to the suffocating Catholic moral order of Leone’s own native Italy.


Two competing bounty hunters (played by Clint Eastwood and Lee Van Cleef) join forces to wipe out an entire band of outlaws. What really strikes you though is the painterly way in which the director Sergio Leone frames the assembly of bandits at a derelict church to resemble the structure of Renaissance religious art works, such as Leonardo da Vinci’s famous portrait of “The Last Supper.”


Indio, the bandit leader and his 12 accomplices, are positioned in the centre of the church like Jesus and his twelve disciples, sub-divided into groups of three. Indio, a pathological killer, is a kind of anti-Jesus who assumes the pulpit to speak to his men about the next daring crime they will commit. Into their midst arrives Eastwood’s bounty hunter character, pretending to be a bandit, though actually a Judas in their midst.


If Kurosawa subverted the prized concept of “loyalty” at the heart of Japan’s moral order, then Leone turned the “moral authority” of Catholic Europe on its head. Judas, the ultimate villain of European civilization, is here turned into Leone’s angelic hero, while “Jesus” and his apostles are recast as villains.


Before the bandits rob the bank at El Paso, they enjoy a “Last Supper” together, breaking bread and gustily drinking wine. “For a Few Dollars More” narrates a systematic hit job on the central icons of Christianity, picking off the bandit apostles one by one, until we are left with only the “anti-Jesus” Indio (played by Gian Maria Volonte), shot through the heart by the Bible-reading Colonel Mortimer (Van Cleef).





Sergio Leone


Can you really get away with wiping out “Jesus” and his whole crew? Won’t you meet your comeuppance and hang from a gibbet like Judas? Entering into the world of “The Good, The Bad and the Ugly,” we discover Blondie (Eastwood) and a new accomplice, Tuco (Eli Wallach) running a scam that involves outlaw Tuco being repeatedly handed over for a reward and brought to the point of being hung for crimes, before having the rope around his neck shot away at the last minute by crack shot Blondie. As if to taunt the immortal Christian legend of remorse and divine retribution, these “Judases” (who soon start betraying each other) keep surviving and tenaciously holding on to life, trying to keep hold of the bounty they share.


If you were to ask, “What is the central message of Catholic Europe, embodied in its timeworn artworks?” then it would be this: Renounce all worldly desires and dreams of gold because the grave gapes for you. The ephemerality of life, the folly of worldly ambition and the need to prepare for the afterlife is the key message which suffuses not just all the religious art of Christendom, but all the secular works, from still lives to portraiture, too.


In Leone’s vision, when at the climax of the film we reach the seemingly infinite metaphysical graveyard, with identical crosses panning out in every direction in which the two “Judases” Blondie and Tuco are encircled, we know we are at the climax. The music soars to new heights of ecstasy as Tuco, mesmerized and uncontainable, feels dizzy with excitement at the thought of claiming the gold that is contained within the key grave.


The entire religiously moral universe has been overthrown and reconfigured as Ennio Morricone’s music — with its paganistic yelps, animalistic beats and choral crescendos — crashes in waves, again and again. In this arena, gold is not being offered up to enter the grave; rather, gold is being dug out of the grave to give luxury and meaning to life itself.


Kurosawa’s genius is widely acknowledged in film circles, but Leone’s lesser appreciation belittles his achievements. Leone took as his starting point two vastly different and alien influences, melded them, reinterpreted them, and then used them as gothic buttresses in a cathedral of ideas that allows him to reimagine the structure and strictures of western religion and how it judges fallible mortal men, pitting them against each other, scrapping over trinkets only to earn holes in their hearts. Leone knows a thing or two about sin, guilt, redemption and the theatre that plays out at the graveside: “The Dollars Trilogy” is his masterful altar piece.


@DamianFlanagan


(This is Part 41 of a series)


In this column, Damian Flanagan, a researcher in Japanese literature, ponders about Japanese culture as he travels back and forth between Japan and Britain.


Profile:


Damian Flanagan is an author and critic born in Britain in 1969. He studied in Tokyo and Kyoto between 1989 and 1990 while a student at Cambridge University. He was engaged in research activities at Kobe University from 1993 through 1999. After taking the master’s and doctoral courses in Japanese literature, he earned a Ph.D. in 2000. He is now based in both Nishinomiya, Hyogo Prefecture, and Manchester. He is the author of “Natsume Soseki: Superstar of World Literature” (Sekai Bungaku no superstar Natsume Soseki).

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
What the classic Spaghetti Westerns really owe to Akira Kurosawa – nonenglishfeed

" } ["summary"]=> string(733) " “For a Few Dollars More” By Damian Flanagan I was recently rewatching the three spaghetti western classics, “A Fistful of Dollars,” “For a Few Dollars More,” and “The Good, The Bad and The Ugly” — collectively known as “The Dollars Trilogy” — films that have long resonated in my imagination. It’s well ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(10322) "





“For a Few Dollars More”


By Damian Flanagan


I was recently rewatching the three spaghetti western classics, “A Fistful of Dollars,” “For a Few Dollars More,” and “The Good, The Bad and The Ugly” — collectively known as “The Dollars Trilogy” — films that have long resonated in my imagination.


It’s well known that “A Fistful of Dollars” was an unauthorised reworking of Japanese director Akira Kurosawa’s highly regarded 1961 film, “Yojinbo” (“The Bodyguard”). Yet if you think about what director Sergio Leone took most from Kurosawa in the trilogy, then it seems less about just copying the character and plot for his opening film and more about allowing Kurosawa’s conceptual ideas to gradually inspire Leone in uniquely interesting ways.


In “Yojinbo” — a film about a masterless samurai playing off two feuding houses of retainers against each other — Kurosawa was daringly satirising the most important value system of pre-modern Japan: The code of feudal loyalty, the idea that absolute, unquestioning obedience to a feudal lord was the greatest samurai virtue.


Confucian ideals about loyalty underpinned the entire power structure of Edo period (1603-1867) Japan and indeed carried on into the modern age, transferred in the Meiji era (1868-1912) to submission to the nation state, and finally in the post-war era to dedication to the Japanese company.


Yet Kurosawa’s anti-hero, memorably played by Toshiro Mifune, is not a self-sacrificing samurai lifted from the pages of classic plays like “The 47 Loyal Retainers,” but rather a pragmatically self-interested and self-contained man, completely uninterested in “loyalty” and casually flipping his services between rival clans as and when he feels like it.





Akira Kurosawa


In “A Fistful of Dollars” (1964), Sergio Leone stayed mostly faithful to the plot of Kurosawa’s original, simply transposing the action from a Japanese village to a Wild West town and retaining the claustrophobic atmosphere. It’s still a story about an enigmatic loner switching loyalty from one scheming clan to another, but in the Wild West — where vigorous individualism reigned supreme — the trampling of the concept of “loyalty” did not carry the same iconoclastic meaning as it did in Japan.


Yet in subsequent films Leone began to explore how his modern take on the Western could be used to subvert specifically European value systems in the same way that Kurosawa had satirised traditional Japanese value systems.


In “For a Few Dollars More” (1965) — while maintaining the same stylized gunfights, cast of degenerate-looking characters, operatic elements and enigmatic lead character as “A Fistful of Dollars” — we have a narrative line which is informed not by Japan but in reaction to the suffocating Catholic moral order of Leone’s own native Italy.


Two competing bounty hunters (played by Clint Eastwood and Lee Van Cleef) join forces to wipe out an entire band of outlaws. What really strikes you though is the painterly way in which the director Sergio Leone frames the assembly of bandits at a derelict church to resemble the structure of Renaissance religious art works, such as Leonardo da Vinci’s famous portrait of “The Last Supper.”


Indio, the bandit leader and his 12 accomplices, are positioned in the centre of the church like Jesus and his twelve disciples, sub-divided into groups of three. Indio, a pathological killer, is a kind of anti-Jesus who assumes the pulpit to speak to his men about the next daring crime they will commit. Into their midst arrives Eastwood’s bounty hunter character, pretending to be a bandit, though actually a Judas in their midst.


If Kurosawa subverted the prized concept of “loyalty” at the heart of Japan’s moral order, then Leone turned the “moral authority” of Catholic Europe on its head. Judas, the ultimate villain of European civilization, is here turned into Leone’s angelic hero, while “Jesus” and his apostles are recast as villains.


Before the bandits rob the bank at El Paso, they enjoy a “Last Supper” together, breaking bread and gustily drinking wine. “For a Few Dollars More” narrates a systematic hit job on the central icons of Christianity, picking off the bandit apostles one by one, until we are left with only the “anti-Jesus” Indio (played by Gian Maria Volonte), shot through the heart by the Bible-reading Colonel Mortimer (Van Cleef).





Sergio Leone


Can you really get away with wiping out “Jesus” and his whole crew? Won’t you meet your comeuppance and hang from a gibbet like Judas? Entering into the world of “The Good, The Bad and the Ugly,” we discover Blondie (Eastwood) and a new accomplice, Tuco (Eli Wallach) running a scam that involves outlaw Tuco being repeatedly handed over for a reward and brought to the point of being hung for crimes, before having the rope around his neck shot away at the last minute by crack shot Blondie. As if to taunt the immortal Christian legend of remorse and divine retribution, these “Judases” (who soon start betraying each other) keep surviving and tenaciously holding on to life, trying to keep hold of the bounty they share.


If you were to ask, “What is the central message of Catholic Europe, embodied in its timeworn artworks?” then it would be this: Renounce all worldly desires and dreams of gold because the grave gapes for you. The ephemerality of life, the folly of worldly ambition and the need to prepare for the afterlife is the key message which suffuses not just all the religious art of Christendom, but all the secular works, from still lives to portraiture, too.


In Leone’s vision, when at the climax of the film we reach the seemingly infinite metaphysical graveyard, with identical crosses panning out in every direction in which the two “Judases” Blondie and Tuco are encircled, we know we are at the climax. The music soars to new heights of ecstasy as Tuco, mesmerized and uncontainable, feels dizzy with excitement at the thought of claiming the gold that is contained within the key grave.


The entire religiously moral universe has been overthrown and reconfigured as Ennio Morricone’s music — with its paganistic yelps, animalistic beats and choral crescendos — crashes in waves, again and again. In this arena, gold is not being offered up to enter the grave; rather, gold is being dug out of the grave to give luxury and meaning to life itself.


Kurosawa’s genius is widely acknowledged in film circles, but Leone’s lesser appreciation belittles his achievements. Leone took as his starting point two vastly different and alien influences, melded them, reinterpreted them, and then used them as gothic buttresses in a cathedral of ideas that allows him to reimagine the structure and strictures of western religion and how it judges fallible mortal men, pitting them against each other, scrapping over trinkets only to earn holes in their hearts. Leone knows a thing or two about sin, guilt, redemption and the theatre that plays out at the graveside: “The Dollars Trilogy” is his masterful altar piece.


@DamianFlanagan


(This is Part 41 of a series)


In this column, Damian Flanagan, a researcher in Japanese literature, ponders about Japanese culture as he travels back and forth between Japan and Britain.


Profile:


Damian Flanagan is an author and critic born in Britain in 1969. He studied in Tokyo and Kyoto between 1989 and 1990 while a student at Cambridge University. He was engaged in research activities at Kobe University from 1993 through 1999. After taking the master’s and doctoral courses in Japanese literature, he earned a Ph.D. in 2000. He is now based in both Nishinomiya, Hyogo Prefecture, and Manchester. He is the author of “Natsume Soseki: Superstar of World Literature” (Sekai Bungaku no superstar Natsume Soseki).

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
What the classic Spaghetti Westerns really owe to Akira Kurosawa – nonenglishfeed

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1634413118) } } ["channel"]=> array(7) { ["title"]=> string(14) "debatepost.com" ["link"]=> string(22) "https://debatepost.com" ["lastbuilddate"]=> string(31) "Sat, 16 Oct 2021 20:16:52 +0000" ["language"]=> string(5) "en-US" ["sy"]=> array(2) { ["updateperiod"]=> string(9) " hourly " ["updatefrequency"]=> string(4) " 1 " } ["generator"]=> string(30) "https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.1" ["tagline"]=> NULL } ["textinput"]=> array(0) { } ["image"]=> array(0) { } ["feed_type"]=> string(3) "RSS" ["feed_version"]=> string(3) "2.0" ["encoding"]=> string(5) "UTF-8" ["_source_encoding"]=> string(0) "" ["ERROR"]=> string(0) "" ["WARNING"]=> string(0) "" ["_CONTENT_CONSTRUCTS"]=> array(6) { [0]=> string(7) "content" [1]=> string(7) "summary" [2]=> string(4) "info" [3]=> string(5) "title" [4]=> string(7) "tagline" [5]=> string(9) "copyright" } ["_KNOWN_ENCODINGS"]=> array(3) { [0]=> string(5) "UTF-8" [1]=> string(8) "US-ASCII" [2]=> string(10) "ISO-8859-1" } ["stack"]=> array(0) { } ["inchannel"]=> bool(false) ["initem"]=> bool(false) ["incontent"]=> bool(false) ["intextinput"]=> bool(false) ["inimage"]=> bool(false) ["current_namespace"]=> bool(false) ["last_modified"]=> string(31) "Sat, 16 Oct 2021 20:18:38 GMT " ["etag"]=> string(29) "RY2sZCUQ25undzoTQI19HAIJtco " }